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Dr David Baraglia
ARC DECRA Fellow, APD Fellow


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Associate Professor Nicholas Buchdahl
Reader in Pure Mathematics


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Dr Pedram Hekmati
Adjunct Senior Lecturer


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Professor Michael Murray
Chair of Pure Mathematics


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Professor Mathai Varghese
Elder Professor of Mathematics, Australian Laureate Fellow, Fellow of the Australian Academy of Scie


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Events matching "+Mathematical +physics"

Likelihood inference for a problem in particle physics
15:10 Fri 27 Jul, 2007 :: G04 Napier Building University of Adelaide :: Prof. Anthony Davison

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a particle accelerator located at CERN, near Geneva, is (currently!) expected to start operation in early 2008. It is located in an underground tunnel 27km in circumference, and when fully operational, will be the world's largest and highest energy particle accelerator. It is hoped that it will provide evidence for the existence of the Higgs boson, the last remaining particle of the so-called Standard Model of particle physics. The quantity of data that will be generated by the LHC is roughly equivalent to that of the European telecommunications network, but this will be boiled down to just a few numbers. After a brief introduction, this talk will outline elements of the statistical problem of detecting the presence of a particle, and then sketch how higher order likelihood asymptotics may be used for signal detection in this context. The work is joint with Nicola Sartori, of the Università Ca' Foscari, in Venice.
Likelihood inference for a problem in particle physics MATT
15:10 Fri 27 Jul, 2007 :: G04 Napier Building University of Adelaide :: Prof. Anthony Davison

Div, grad, curl, and all that
15:10 Fri 10 Aug, 2007 :: G08 Mathematics Building University of Adelaide :: Prof. Mike Eastwood :: School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Adelaide

These well-known differential operators are, of course, important in applied mathematics. This is just the tip of an iceberg. I shall indicate some of what lies beneath the surface. There are links with topology, physics, symmetry groups, finite element schemes, and more besides. This talk will touch on these different topics by means of examples. Little prior knowledge will be assumed beyond the equality of mixed partial derivatives.
Rubber Ballons -- Prototypes of Hysteresis
15:10 Fri 16 Nov, 2007 :: G04 Napier Building University of Adelaide :: Emeritus Prof. Ingo Muller :: Technical University Berlin

Rubber balloons are characterized by a non-monotone pressure-radius relation which presages interesting non-trivial stability problems. A stability criterion is developed and exploited in order to show that the balloon may be stabilized at any radius by loading it with a piston under an elastic spring, if only the spring is hard enough. If two connected balloons are subject to an inflation-deflation cycle, the pressure-radius curve exhibits a fairly simple hysteresis loop. More complex hysteresis loops appear when more balloons are all inflated together. And if many balloons are inflated and deflated at the same time, the hysteresis loop assumes the form reminiscent of pseudo-elasticity. Stability in those complex cases is determined by a simple suggestive argument. References: [1] W.Kitsche, I.Muller, P.Strehlow. Simulation of pseudo-elastic behaviour in a system of rubber balloons. In: Metastability and Incompletely Posed Problems, S.Antman, J.L.Ericksen, D.Kinderlehrer, I.Muller (eds.) IMA Volume No.3, Springer Verlag, New York (1987) [2] I.Muller, P.Strehlow, Rubber and Rubber Balloons, Springer Lecture Notes on Physics, Springer Verlag, Heidelberg (2004)
Hunting Non-linear Mathematical Butterflies
15:10 Fri 23 Jan, 2009 :: Napier LG29 :: Prof Nalini Joshi :: University of Sydney

The utility of mathematical models relies on their ability to predict the future from a known set of initial states. But there are non-linear systems, like the weather, where future behaviours are unpredictable unless their initial state is known to infinite precision. This is the butterfly effect. I will show how to analyse functions to overcome this problem for the classical Painleve equations, differential equations that provide archetypical non-linear models of modern physics.
Holonomy groups
15:10 Fri 7 May, 2010 :: Napier LG24 :: Dr Thomas Leistner :: University of Adelaide

In the first part of the talk I will illustrate some basic concepts of differential geometry that lead to the notion of a holonomy group. Then I will explain Berger's classification of Riemannian holonomy groups and discuss questions that arose from it. Finally, I will focus on holonomy groups of Lorentzian manifolds and indicate briefly why all this is of relevance to present-day theoretical physics.
Mathematica Seminar
15:10 Wed 28 Jul, 2010 :: Engineering Annex 314 :: Kim Schriefer :: Wolfram Research

The Mathematica Seminars 2010 offer an opportunity to experience the applicability, ease-of-use, as well as the advancements of Mathematica 7 in education and academic research. These seminars will highlight the latest directions in technical computing with Mathematica, and the impact this technology has across a wide range of academic fields, from maths, physics and biology to finance, economics and business. Those not yet familiar with Mathematica will gain an overview of the system and discover the breadth of applications it can address, while experts will get firsthand experience with recent advances in Mathematica like parallel computing, digital image processing, point-and-click palettes, built-in curated data, as well as courseware examples.
Index theory in Mathematics and Physics
15:10 Fri 20 Aug, 2010 :: Napier G04 :: Prof Alan Carey :: Australian National University

This lecture is a personal (and partly historical) overview in non-technical terms of the topic described in the title, from first year linear algebra to von Neumann algebras.
String Theory and the Quest for Quantum Spacetime
15:10 Fri 9 Mar, 2012 :: Ligertwood 333 Law Lecture Theatre 2 :: Prof Rajesh Gopakumar :: Harish-Chandra Research Institute

Media...
Space and time together constitute one of the most basic elements of physical reality. Since Einstein spacetime has become an active participant in the dynamics of the gravitational force. However, our notion of a quantum spacetime is still rudimentary. String theory, building upon hints provided from the physics of black holes, seems to be suggesting a very novel, "holographic" picture of what quantum spacetime might be. This relies on some very surprising connections of gravity with quantum field theories (which provide the framework for the description of the other fundamental interactions of nature). In this talk, I will try and convey some of the flavour of these connections as well as its significance.
Index type invariants for twisted signature complexes
13:10 Fri 11 May, 2012 :: Napier LG28 :: Prof Mathai Varghese :: University of Adelaide

Atiyah-Patodi-Singer proved an index theorem for non-local boundary conditions in the 1970's that has been widely used in mathematics and mathematical physics. A key application of their theory gives the index theorem for signature operators on oriented manifolds with boundary. As a consequence, they defined certain secondary invariants that were metric independent. I will discuss some recent work with Benameur where we extend the APS theory to signature operators twisted by an odd degree closed differential form, and study the corresponding secondary invariants.
Adventures with group theory: counting and constructing polynomial invariants for applications in quantum entanglement and molecular phylogenetics
15:10 Fri 8 Jun, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Peter Jarvis :: The University of Tasmania

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In many modelling problems in mathematics and physics, a standard challenge is dealing with several repeated instances of a system under study. If linear transformations are involved, then the machinery of tensor products steps in, and it is the job of group theory to control how the relevant symmetries lift from a single system, to having many copies. At the level of group characters, the construction which does this is called PLETHYSM. In this talk all this will be contextualised via two case studies: entanglement invariants for multipartite quantum systems, and Markov invariants for tree reconstruction in molecular phylogenetics. By the end of the talk, listeners will have understood why Alice, Bob and Charlie love Cayley's hyperdeterminant, and they will know why the three squangles -- polynomial beasts of degree 5 in 256 variables, with a modest 50,000 terms or so -- can tell us a lot about quartet trees!
Notions of non-commutative metric spaces; why and how
15:10 Fri 15 Jun, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Ittay Weiss :: The University of the South Pacific

Media...
The classical notion of metric space includes the axiom of symmetry: d(x,y)=d(y,x). Some applications of metric techniques to problems in computer graphics, concurrency, and physics (to mention a few) are seriously stressing the limitations imposed by symmetry, resulting in various relaxations of it. I will review some of the motivating problems that seem to require non-symmetry and then review some of the suggested models to deal with the problem. My review will be critical to the topological implications (which are often unpleasant) of some of the models and I will present metric 1-spaces, a new notion of generalized metric spaces.
Quantisation commutes with reduction
15:10 Fri 14 Sep, 2012 :: B.20 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Peter Hochs :: Leibniz University Hannover

Media...
The "Quantisation commutes with reduction" principle is an idea from physics, which has powerful applications in mathematics. It basically states that the ways in which symmetry can be used to simplify a physical system in classical and quantum mechanics, are compatible. This provides a strong link between the areas in mathematics used to describe symmetry in classical and quantum mechanics: symplectic geometry and representation theory, respectively. It has been proved in the 1990s that quantisation indeed commutes with reduction, under the important assumption that all spaces and symmetry groups involved are compact. This talk is an introduction to this principle and, if time permits, its mathematical relevance.
Moduli spaces of instantons in algebraic geometry and physics
15:10 Fri 19 Oct, 2012 :: B.20 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Ugo Bruzzo :: International School for Advanced Studies Trieste

Media...
I will give a quick introduction to the notion of instanton, stressing its role in physics and in mathematics. I will also show how algebraic geometry provides powerful tools to study the geometry of the moduli spaces of instantons.
Einstein's special relativity beyond the speed of light
14:10 Mon 18 Mar, 2013 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof. Jim Hill :: School of Mathematical Sciences

Media...
We derive extended Lorentz transformations between inertial frames for relative velocities greater than the speed of light, and which are complementary to the Lorentz transformation giving rise to the Einstein special theory of relativity. The new transformations arise from the same mathematical framework as the Lorentz transformation, displaying singular behaviour when the relative velocity approaches the speed of light and generating the same addition law for velocities, but most importantly, do not involve the need to introduce imaginary masses or complicated physics to provide well-defined expressions.
How fast? Bounding the mixing time of combinatorial Markov chains
15:10 Fri 22 Mar, 2013 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Catherine Greenhill :: University of New South Wales

Media...
A Markov chain is a stochastic process which is "memoryless", in that the next state of the chain depends only on the current state, and not on how it got there. It is a classical result that an ergodic Markov chain has a unique stationary distribution. However, classical theory does not provide any information on the rate of convergence to stationarity. Around 30 years ago, the mixing time of a Markov chain was introduced to measure the number of steps required before the distribution of the chain is within some small distance of the stationary distribution. One reason why this is important is that researchers in areas such as physics and biology use Markov chains to sample from large sets of interest. Rigorous bounds on the mixing time of their chain allows these researchers to have confidence in their results. Bounding the mixing time of combinatorial Markov chains can be a challenge, and there are only a few approaches available. I will discuss the main methods and give examples for each (with pretty pictures).
Boundary-value problems for the Ricci flow
15:10 Fri 15 Aug, 2014 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Artem Pulemotov :: The University of Queensland

Media...
The Ricci flow is a differential equation describing the evolution of a Riemannian manifold (i.e., a "curved" geometric object) into an Einstein manifold (i.e., an object with a "constant" curvature). This equation is particularly famous for its key role in the proof of the Poincare Conjecture. Understanding the Ricci flow on manifolds with boundary is a difficult problem with applications to a variety of fields, such as topology and mathematical physics. The talk will survey the current progress towards the resolution of this problem. In particular, we will discuss new results concerning spaces with symmetries.
Micro Magnetofluidics - Wireless Manipulation for Microfluidics
15:10 Fri 24 Oct, 2014 :: N.132 Engineering North :: Professor Nam-Trung Nguyen :: Griffith University

Media...
Microfluidics is rich in multi-physics phenomena, which offer fundamentally new capabilities in the manipulation and detection of biological particles. Most current microfluidic applications are based on hydrodynamic, electrokinetic, acoustic and optic actuation. Implementing these concepts requires bulky external pumping/valving systems and energy supplies. The required wires and connectors make their fabrication and handling difficult. Most of the conventional approaches induce heat that may affect sensitive bio particles such as cells. There is a need for a technology for fluid handling in microfluidic devices that is of low-cost, simple, wireless, free of induced heat and independent of pH level or ion concentration. The use of magnetism would provide a wireless solution for this need. Micro magnetofluidics is a newly established research field that links magnetism and microfluidics to gain new capabilities. Magnetism provides a convenient and wireless way for control and manipulation of fluid flow in the microscale. Investigation of magnetism-induced phenomena in a microfluidic device has the advantage of well-defined experimental condition such as temperature and magnetic field because of the system size. This talk presents recent interesting phenomena in both continuous-flow and digital micro magnetofluidics.
IGA Workshop on Symmetries and Spinors: Interactions Between Geometry and Physics
09:30 Mon 13 Apr, 2015 :: Conference Room 7.15 on Level 7 of the Ingkarni Wardli building :: J. Figueroa-O'Farrill (University of Edinburgh), M. Zabzine (Uppsala University), et al

Media...
The interplay between physics and geometry has lead to stunning advances and enriched the internal structure of each field. This is vividly exemplified in the theory of supergravity, which is a supersymmetric extension of Einstein's relativity theory to the small scales governed by the laws of quantum physics. Sophisticated mathematics is being employed for finding solutions to the generalised Einstein equations and in return, they provide a rich source for new exotic geometries. This workshop brings together world-leading scientists from both, geometry and mathematical physics, as well as young researchers and students, to meet and learn about each others work.
Analytic complexity of bivariate holomorphic functions and cluster trees
12:10 Fri 2 Oct, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Timur Sadykov :: Plekhanov University, Moscow

The Kolmogorov-Arnold theorem yields a representation of a multivariate continuous function in terms of a composition of functions which depend on at most two variables. In the analytic case, understanding the complexity of such a representation naturally leads to the notion of the analytic complexity of (a germ of) a bivariate multi-valued analytic function. According to Beloshapka's local definition, the order of complexity of any univariate function is equal to zero while the n-th complexity class is defined recursively to consist of functions of the form a(b(x,y)+c(x,y)), where a is a univariate analytic function and b and c belong to the (n-1)-th complexity class. Such a represenation is meant to be valid for suitable germs of multi-valued holomorphic functions. A randomly chosen bivariate analytic functions will most likely have infinite analytic complexity. However, for a number of important families of special functions of mathematical physics their complexity is finite and can be computed or estimated. Using this, we introduce the notion of the analytic complexity of a binary tree, in particular, a cluster tree, and investigate its properties.
Collective and aneural foraging in biological systems
15:10 Fri 3 Mar, 2017 :: Lower Napier LG14 :: Dr Jerome Buhl and Dr David Vogel :: The University of Adelaide

The field of collective behaviour uses concepts originally adapted from statistical physics to study how complex collective phenomena such as mass movement or swarm intelligence emerge from relatively simple interactions between individuals. Here we will focus on two applications of this framework. First we will have look at new insights into the evolution of sociality brought by combining models of nutrition and social interactions to explore phenomena such as collective foraging decisions, emergence of social organisation and social immunity. Second, we will look at the networks built by slime molds under exploration and foraging context.
Hyperbolic geometry and knots
15:10 Fri 28 Apr, 2017 :: Engineering South S111 :: A/Prof Jessica Purcell :: Monash University

It has been known since the early 1980s that the complement of a knot or link decomposes into geometric pieces, and the most common geometry is hyperbolic. However, the connections between hyperbolic geometry and other knot and link invariants are not well-understood. Conjectured connections have applications to quantum topology and physics, 3-manifold geometry and topology, and knot theory. In this talk, we will describe several results relating the hyperbolic geometry of a knot or link to other invariants, and their implications.
What are operator algebras and what are they good for?
15:10 Fri 12 May, 2017 :: Engineering South S111 :: Prof Aidan Sims :: University of Wollongong

Back in the early 1900s when people were first grappling with the new ideas of quantum mechanics and looking for mathematical techniques to study them, they found themselves, unavoidably, dealing with what have now become known as operator algebras. As a research area, operator algebras has come a very long way since then, and has spread out to touch on many other areas of mathematics, as well as maintaining its links with mathematical physics. I'll try to convey roughly what operator algebras are, and describe some of the highlights of their career thus far, particularly the more recent ones.
Mathematics is Biology's Next Microscope (Only Better!)
15:10 Fri 11 Aug, 2017 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Dr Robyn Araujo :: Queensland University of Technology

While mathematics has long been considered "an essential tool for physics", the foundations of biology and the life sciences have received significantly less influence from mathematical ideas and theory. In this talk, I will give a brief discussion of my recent research on robustness in molecular signalling networks, as an example of a complex biological question that calls for a mathematical answer. In particular, it has been a long-standing mystery how the extraordinarily complex communication networks inside living cells, comprising thousands of different interacting molecules, are able to function robustly since complexity is generally associated with fragility. Mathematics has now suggested a resolution to this paradox through the discovery that robust adaptive signalling networks must be constructed from a just small number of well-defined universal modules (or "motifs"), connected together. The existence of these newly-discovered modules has important implications for evolutionary biology, embryology and development, cancer research, and drug development.
Mathematics is Biology'€™s Next Microscope (Only Better!)
15:10 Fri 11 Aug, 2017 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Dr Robyn Araujo :: Queensland University of Technology

While mathematics has long been considered “an essential tool for physics", the foundations of biology and the life sciences have received significantly less influence from mathematical ideas and theory. In this talk, I will give a brief discussion of my recent research on robustness in molecular signalling networks, as an example of a complex biological question that calls for a mathematical answer. In particular, it has been a long-standing mystery how the extraordinarily complex communication networks inside living cells, comprising thousands of different interacting molecules, are able to function robustly since complexity is generally associated with fragility. Mathematics has now suggested a resolution to this paradox through the discovery that robust adaptive signalling networks must be constructed from a just small number of well-defined universal modules (or “motifs”), connected together. The existence of these newly-discovered modules has important implications for evolutionary biology, embryology and development, cancer research, and drug development.
On the fundamental of Rayleigh-Taylor instability and interfacial mixing
15:10 Fri 15 Sep, 2017 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Prof Snezhana Abarzhi :: University of Western Australia

Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) develops when fluids of different densities are accelerated against their density gradient. Extensive interfacial mixing of the fluids ensues with time. Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing controls a broad variety of processes in fluids, plasmas and materials, in high and low energy density regimes, at astrophysical and atomistic scales. Examples include formation of hot spot in inertial confinement, supernova explosion, stellar and planetary convection, flows in atmosphere and ocean, reactive and supercritical fluids, material transformation under impact and light-material interaction. In some of these cases (e.g. inertial confinement fusion) RT mixing should be tightly mitigated; in some others (e.g. turbulent combustion) it should be strongly enhanced. Understanding the fundamentals of RTI is crucial for achieving a better control of non-equilibrium processes in nature and technology. Traditionally, it was presumed that RTI leads to uncontrolled growth of small-scale imperfections, single-scale nonlinear dynamics, and extensive mixing that is similar to canonical turbulence. The recent success of the theory and experiments in fluids and plasmas suggests an alternative scenario of RTI evolution. It finds that the interface is necessary for RT mixing to accelerate, the acceleration effects are strong enough to suppress the development of turbulence, and the RT dynamics is multi-scale and has significant degree of order. This talk presents a physics-based consideration of fundamentals of RTI and RT mixing, and summarizes what is certain and what is not so certain in our knowledge of RTI. The focus question - How to influence the regularization process in RT mixing? We also discuss new opportunities for improvements of predictive modeling capabilities, physical description, and control of RT mixing in fluids, plasmas and materials.
Understanding burn injuries and first aid treatment using simple mathematical models
15:10 Fri 13 Oct, 2017 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Prof Mat Simpson :: Queensland University of Technology

Scald burns from accidental exposure to hot liquids are the most common cause of burn injury in children. Over 2000 children are treated for accidental burn injuries in Australia each year. Despite the frequency of these injuries, basic questions about the physics of heat transfer in living tissues remain unanswered. For example, skin thickness varies with age and anatomical location, yet our understanding of how tissue damage from thermal injury is influenced by skin thickness is surprisingly limited. In this presentation we will consider a series of porcine experiments to study heat transfer in living tissues. We consider burning the living tissue, as well as applying various first aid treatment strategies to cool the living tissue after injury. By calibrating solutions of simple mathematical models to match the experimental data we provide insight into how thermal energy propagates through living tissues, as well as exploring different first aid strategies. We conclude by outlining some of our current work that aims to produce more realistic mathematical models.

News matching "+Mathematical +physics"

Mini Winter School on Geometry and Physics
The Institute for Geometry and its Applications will host a Winter School on Geometry and Physics on 20-22 July 2009. There will be three days of expository lectures aimed at 3rd year and honours students interested in postgraduate studies in pure mathematics or mathematical physics. Posted Wed 24 Jun 09.

More information...

Publications matching "+Mathematical +physics"

Publications
Non-commutative correspondences, duality and D-branes in bivariant K-theory
Brodzki, J; Varghese, Mathai; Rosenberg, J; Szabo, R, Advances in Theoretical and Mathematical Physics 13 (497–552) 2009
T-duality as a duality of loop group bundles
Bouwknegt, Pier; Varghese, Mathai, Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical (Print Edition) 42 (162001-1–162001-8) 2009
D-branes, RR-fields and duality on noncommutative manifolds
Brodzki, J; Varghese, Mathai; Rosenberg, J; Szabo, R, Communications in Mathematical Physics 277 (643–706) 2008
The (Gamma)over-cap-genus and a regularization of an S1-equivariant Euler class
Lu, Rongmin, Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical (Print Edition) 41 (425204-1–425204-13) 2008
Spectral curves and the mass of hyperbolic monopoles
Norbury, Paul; Romao, Nuno, Communications in Mathematical Physics 270 (295–333) 2007
Flux compactifications on projective spaces and the S-duality puzzle
Bouwknegt, Pier; Evslin, J; Jurco, B; Varghese, Mathai; Sati, Hicham, Advances in Theoretical and Mathematical Physics 10 (345–394) 2006
Nonassociative Tori and Applications to T-Duality
Bouwknegt, Pier; Hannabuss, K; Varghese, Mathai, Communications in Mathematical Physics 264 (41–69) 2006
T-duality for torus bundles with H-fluxes via noncommutative topology, II: the high-dimensional case and the T-duality group
Varghese, Mathai; Rosenberg, J, Advances in Theoretical and Mathematical Physics 10 (123–158) 2006
Yang-Mills theory for bundle gerbes
Varghese, Mathai; Roberts, David, Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical (Print Edition) 39 (6039–6044) 2006
Arithmetic properties of eigenvalues of generalized harper operators on graphs
Dodziuk, Josef; Varghese, Mathai; Yates, Stuart, Communications in Mathematical Physics 262 (269–297) 2005
Bundle gerbes for Chern-Simons and Wess-Zumino-Witten theories
Carey, Alan; Johnson, Stuart; Murray, Michael; Stevenson, Daniel; Wang, Bai-Ling, Communications in Mathematical Physics 259 (577–613) 2005
Gauged vortices in a background
Romao, Nuno, Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical (Print Edition) 38 (9127–9144) 2005
T-duality for principal torus bundles and dimensionally reduced Gysin sequences
Bouwknegt, Pier; Hannabuss, K; Varghese, Mathai, Advances in Theoretical and Mathematical Physics 9 (1–25) 2005
T-duality for torus bundles with H-fluxes via noncommutative topology
Varghese, Mathai; Rosenberg, J, Communications in Mathematical Physics 253 (705–721) 2005
M-theory, type IIA superstrings, and elliptic cohomology
Kriz, I; Sati, Hicham, Advances in Theoretical and Mathematical Physics 8 (345–394) 2004
T-duality: Topology change from H-flux
Bouwknegt, Pier; Evslin, J; Varghese, Mathai, Communications in Mathematical Physics 249 (383–415) 2004
A note on monopole moduli spaces
Murray, Michael; Singer, Michael, Journal of Mathematical Physics 44 (3517–3531) 2003
Chern character in twisted K-theory: Equivariant and holomorphic cases
Varghese, Mathai; Stevenson, Daniel, Communications in Mathematical Physics 236 (161–186) 2003
Higgs fields, bundle gerbes and string structures
Murray, Michael; Stevenson, Daniel, Communications in Mathematical Physics 243 (541–555) 2003
The universal gerbe, Dixmier-Douady class, and gauge theory
Carey, Alan; Mickelsson, J, Letters in Mathematical Physics 59 (47–60) 2002
Twisted K-theory and K-theory of bundle gerbes
Bouwknegt, Pier; Carey, Alan; Varghese, Mathai; Murray, Michael; Stevenson, Daniel, Communications in Mathematical Physics 228 (17–45) 2002
Commutative geometries are spin manifolds
Rennie, Adam, Reviews in Mathematical Physics 13 (409–464) 2001
Coupled Painlev systems and quartic potentials
Hone, Andrew, Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical (Print Edition) 34 (2235–2245) 2001
Hilbert C*-systems for actions of the circle group
Baumgaertel, H; Carey, Alan, Reports on Mathematical Physics 47 (349–361) 2001
Non-Schlesinger deformations of ordinary differential equations with rational coefficients
Kitaev, Alexandre, Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical (Print Edition) 34 (2259–2272) 2001
On the continuum limit of fermionic topological charge in lattice gauge theory
Adams, David, Journal of Mathematical Physics 42 (5522–5533) 2001
Regularizing the KdV equation near a blow-up surface
Joshi, Nalini, Theoretical and Mathematical Physics 127 (744–750) 2001
Twisted index theory on good orbifolds, II: Fractional quantum numbers
Marcolli, M; Varghese, Mathai, Communications in Mathematical Physics 217 (55–87) 2001
A gerbe obstruction to quantization of fermions on odd-dimensional manifolds with boundary
Carey, Alan; Mickelsson, J, Letters in Mathematical Physics 51 (145–160) 2000
A remark of Schwarz's topological field theory
Adams, David; Prodanov, E, Letters in Mathematical Physics 51 (249–255) 2000
Bundle gerbes applied to quantum field theory
Carey, Alan; Mickelsson, J; Murray, Michael, Reviews in Mathematical Physics 12 (65–90) 2000
On the complete integrability of the discrete Nahm equations
Murray, Michael; Singer, Michael, Communications in Mathematical Physics 210 (497–519) 2000

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