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Professor Nigel Bean
Chair of Applied Mathematics


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Associate Professor Joshua Ross
Senior Lecturer in Applied Mathematics


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Courses matching "+Operations +research"

Optimisation and Operations Research

Operations Research (OR) is the application of mathematical techniques and analysis to problem solving in business and industry, in particular to carrying out more efficiently tasks such as scheduling, or optimising the provision of services. OR is an interdisciplinary topic drawing from mathematical modelling, optimisation theory, game theory, decision analysis, statistics, and simulation to help make decisions in complex situations. This first course in OR concentrates on mathematical modelling and optimisation: for example maximising production capacity, or minimising risk. It focuses on linear optimisation problems involving both continuous, and integer variables. The course covers a variety of mathematical techniques for linear optimisation, and the theory behind them. It will also explore the role of heuristics in such problems. Examples will be presented from important application areas, such as the emergency services, telecommunications, transportation, and manufacturing. Students will undertake a team project based on an actual Adelaide problem. Topics covered are: formulating a linear program; the Simplex Method; duality and Complementary slackness; sensitivity analysis; an interior point method; alternative means to solve some linear and integer programs, such as primal-dual approaches methods from a complete solution (such as Greedy Methods, and Simulated Annealing), methods from a partial solution (such as Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm, and branch-and-bound).

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Events matching "+Operations +research"

American option pricing in a Markov chain market model
15:10 Fri 19 Mar, 2010 :: School Board Room :: Prof Robert Elliott :: School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Adelaide

This paper considers a model for asset pricing in a world where the randomness is modeled by a Markov chain rather than Brownian motion. In this paper we develop a theory of optimal stopping and related variational inequalities for American options in this model. A version of Saigal's Lemma is established and numerical algorithms developed. This is a joint work with John van der Hoek.
Estimation of sparse Bayesian networks using a score-based approach
15:10 Fri 30 Apr, 2010 :: School Board Room :: Dr Jessica Kasza :: University of Copenhagen

The estimation of Bayesian networks given high-dimensional data sets, with more variables than there are observations, has been the focus of much recent research. These structures provide a flexible framework for the representation of the conditional independence relationships of a set of variables, and can be particularly useful in the estimation of genetic regulatory networks given gene expression data.

In this talk, I will discuss some new research on learning sparse networks, that is, networks with many conditional independence restrictions, using a score-based approach. In the case of genetic regulatory networks, such sparsity reflects the view that each gene is regulated by relatively few other genes. The presented approach allows prior information about the overall sparsity of the underlying structure to be included in the analysis, as well as the incorporation of prior knowledge about the connectivity of individual nodes within the network.

Interpolation of complex data using spatio-temporal compressive sensing
13:00 Fri 28 May, 2010 :: Santos Lecture Theatre :: A/Prof Matthew Roughan :: School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Adelaide

Many complex datasets suffer from missing data, and interpolating these missing elements is a key task in data analysis. Moreover, it is often the case that we see only a linear combination of the desired measurements, not the measurements themselves. For instance, in network management, it is easy to count the traffic on a link, but harder to measure the end-to-end flows. Additionally, typical interpolation algorithms treat either the spatial, or the temporal components of data separately, but in many real datasets have strong spatio-temporal structure that we would like to exploit in reconstructing the missing data. In this talk I will describe a novel reconstruction algorithm that exploits concepts from the growing area of compressive sensing to solve all of these problems and more. The approach works so well on Internet traffic matrices that we can obtain a reasonable reconstruction with as much as 98% of the original data missing.
Some thoughts on wine production
15:05 Fri 18 Jun, 2010 :: School Board Room :: Prof Zbigniew Michalewicz :: School of Computer Science, University of Adelaide

In the modern information era, managers (e.g. winemakers) recognize the competitive opportunities represented by decision-support tools which can provide a significant cost savings & revenue increases for their businesses. Wineries make daily decisions on the processing of grapes, from harvest time (prediction of maturity of grapes, scheduling of equipment and labour, capacity planning, scheduling of crushers) through tank farm activities (planning and scheduling of wine and juice transfers on the tank farm) to packaging processes (bottling and storage activities). As such operation is quite complex, the whole area is loaded with interesting OR-related issues. These include the issues of global vs. local optimization, relationship between prediction and optimization, operating in dynamic environments, strategic vs. tactical optimization, and multi-objective optimization & trade-off analysis. During the talk we address the above issues; a few real-world applications will be shown and discussed to emphasize some of the presented material.
A spatial-temporal point process model for fine resolution multisite rainfall data from Roma, Italy
14:10 Thu 19 Aug, 2010 :: Napier G04 :: A/Prof Paul Cowpertwait :: Auckland University of Technology

A point process rainfall model is further developed that has storm origins occurring in space-time according to a Poisson process. Each storm origin has a random radius so that storms occur as circular regions in two-dimensional space, where the storm radii are taken to be independent exponential random variables. Storm origins are of random type z, where z follows a continuous probability distribution. Cell origins occur in a further spatial Poisson process and have arrival times that follow a Neyman-Scott point process. Cell origins have random radii so that cells form discs in two-dimensional space. Statistical properties up to third order are derived and used to fit the model to 10 min series taken from 23 sites across the Roma region, Italy. Distributional properties of the observed annual maxima are compared to equivalent values sampled from series that are simulated using the fitted model. The results indicate that the model will be of use in urban drainage projects for the Roma region.
Compound and constrained regression analyses for EIV models
15:05 Fri 27 Aug, 2010 :: Napier LG28 :: Prof Wei Zhu :: State University of New York at Stony Brook

In linear regression analysis, randomness often exists in the independent variables and the resulting models are referred to errors-in-variables (EIV) models. The existing general EIV modeling framework, the structural model approach, is parametric and dependent on the usually unknown underlying distributions. In this work, we introduce a general non-parametric EIV modeling framework, the compound regression analysis, featuring an intuitive geometric representation and a 1-1 correspondence to the structural model. Properties, examples and further generalizations of this new modeling approach are discussed in this talk.
Simultaneous confidence band and hypothesis test in generalised varying-coefficient models
15:05 Fri 10 Sep, 2010 :: Napier LG28 :: Prof Wenyang Zhang :: University of Bath

Generalised varying-coefficient models (GVC) are very important models. There are a considerable number of literature addressing these models. However, most of the existing literature are devoted to the estimation procedure. In this talk, I will systematically investigate the statistical inference for GVC, which includes confidence band as well as hypothesis test. I will show the asymptotic distribution of the maximum discrepancy between the estimated functional coefficient and the true functional coefficient. I will compare different approaches for the construction of confidence band and hypothesis test. Finally, the proposed statistical inference methods are used to analyse the data from China about contraceptive use there, which leads to some interesting findings.
TBA
15:05 Fri 22 Oct, 2010 :: Napier LG28 :: Dr Andy Lian :: University of Adelaide

Arbitrage bounds for weighted variance swap prices
15:05 Fri 3 Dec, 2010 :: Napier LG28 :: Prof Mark Davis :: Imperial College London

This paper builds on earlier work by Davis and Hobson (Mathematical Finance, 2007) giving model-free---except for a 'frictionless markets' assumption--- necessary and sufficient conditions for absence of arbitrage given a set of current-time put and call options on some underlying asset. Here we suppose that the prices of a set of put options, all maturing at the same time, are given and satisfy the conditions for consistency with absence of arbitrage. We now add a path-dependent option, specifically a weighted variance swap, to the set of traded assets and ask what are the conditions on its time-0 price under which consistency with absence of arbitrage is maintained. In the present work, we work under the extra modelling assumption that the underlying asset price process has continuous paths. In general, we find that there is always a non- trivial lower bound to the range of arbitrage-free prices, but only in the case of a corridor swap do we obtain a finite upper bound. In the case of, say, the vanilla variance swap, a finite upper bound exists when there are additional traded European options which constrain the left wing of the volatility surface in appropriate ways.
Queues with skill based routing under FCFS–ALIS regime
15:10 Fri 11 Feb, 2011 :: B17 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Gideon Weiss :: The University of Haifa, Israel

We consider a system where jobs of several types are served by servers of several types, and a bipartite graph between server types and job types describes feasible assignments. This is a common situation in manufacturing, call centers with skill based routing, matching of parent-child in adoption or matching in kidney transplants etc. We consider the case of first come first served policy: jobs are assigned to the first available feasible server in order of their arrivals. We consider two types of policies for assigning customers to idle servers - a random assignment and assignment to the longest idle server (ALIS) We survey some results for four different situations:

  • For a loss system we find conditions for reversibility and insensitivity.
  • For a manufacturing type system, in which there is enough capacity to serve all jobs, we discuss a product form solution and waiting times.
  • For an infinite matching model in which an infinite sequence of customers of IID types, and infinite sequence of servers of IID types are matched according to first come first, we obtain a product form stationary distribution for this system, which we use to calculate matching rates.
  • For a call center model with overload and abandonments we make some plausible observations.

This talk surveys joint work with Ivo Adan, Rene Caldentey, Cor Hurkens, Ed Kaplan and Damon Wischik, as well as work by Jeremy Visschers, Rishy Talreja and Ward Whitt.

Bioinspired computation in combinatorial optimization: algorithms and their computational complexity
15:10 Fri 11 Mar, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Frank Neumann :: The University of Adelaide

Media...
Bioinspired computation methods, such as evolutionary algorithms and ant colony optimization, are being applied successfully to complex engineering and combinatorial optimization problems. The computational complexity analysis of this type of algorithms has significantly increased the theoretical understanding of these successful algorithms. In this talk, I will give an introduction into this field of research and present some important results that we achieved for problems from combinatorial optimization. These results can also be found in my recent textbook "Bioinspired Computation in Combinatorial Optimization -- Algorithms and Their Computational Complexity".
Classification for high-dimensional data
15:10 Fri 1 Apr, 2011 :: Conference Room Level 7 Ingkarni Wardli :: Associate Prof Inge Koch :: The University of Adelaide

For two-class classification problems Fisher's discriminant rule performs well in many scenarios provided the dimension, d, is much smaller than the sample size n. As the dimension increases, Fisher's rule may no longer be adequate, and can perform as poorly as random guessing. In this talk we look at new ways of overcoming this poor performance for high-dimensional data by suitably modifying Fisher's rule, and in particular we describe the 'Features Annealed Independence Rule (FAIR)? of Fan and Fan (2008) and a rule based on canonical correlation analysis. I describe some theoretical developments, and also show analysis of data which illustrate the performance of these modified rule.
On parameter estimation in population models
15:10 Fri 6 May, 2011 :: 715 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Joshua Ross :: The University of Adelaide

Essential to applying a mathematical model to a real-world application is calibrating the model to data. Methods for calibrating population models often become computationally infeasible when the populations size (more generally the size of the state space) becomes large, or other complexities such as time-dependent transition rates, or sampling error, are present. Here we will discuss the use of diffusion approximations to perform estimation in several scenarios, with successively reduced assumptions: (i) under the assumption of stationarity (the process had been evolving for a very long time with constant parameter values); (ii) transient dynamics (the assumption of stationarity is invalid, and thus only constant parameter values may be assumed); and, (iii) time-inhomogeneous chains (the parameters may vary with time) and accounting for observation error (a sample of the true state is observed).
Optimal experimental design for stochastic population models
15:00 Wed 1 Jun, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Dan Pagendam :: CSIRO, Brisbane

Markov population processes are popular models for studying a wide range of phenomena including the spread of disease, the evolution of chemical reactions and the movements of organisms in population networks (metapopulations). Our ability to use these models effectively can be limited by our knowledge about parameters, such as disease transmission and recovery rates in an epidemic. Recently, there has been interest in devising optimal experimental designs for stochastic models, so that practitioners can collect data in a manner that maximises the precision of maximum likelihood estimates of the parameters for these models. I will discuss some recent work on optimal design for a variety of population models, beginning with some simple one-parameter models where the optimal design can be obtained analytically and moving on to more complicated multi-parameter models in epidemiology that involve latent states and non-exponentially distributed infectious periods. For these more complex models, the optimal design must be arrived at using computational methods and we rely on a Gaussian diffusion approximation to obtain analytical expressions for Fisher's information matrix, which is at the heart of most optimality criteria in experimental design. I will outline a simple cross-entropy algorithm that can be used for obtaining optimal designs for these models. We will also explore the improvements in experimental efficiency when using the optimal design over some simpler designs, such as the design where observations are spaced equidistantly in time.
Priority queueing systems with random switchover times and generalisations of the Kendall-Takacs equation
16:00 Wed 1 Jun, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Andrei Bejan :: The University of Cambridge

In this talk I will review existing analytical results for priority queueing systems with Poisson incoming flows, general service times and a single server which needs some (random) time to switch between requests of different priority. Specifically, I will discuss analytical results for the busy period and workload of such systems with a special structure of switchover times. The results related to the busy period can be seen as generalisations of the famous Kendall-Tak\'{a}cs functional equation for $M|G|1$: being formulated in terms of Laplace-Stieltjes transform, they represent systems of functional recurrent equations. I will present a methodology and algorithms of their numerical solution; the efficiency of these algorithms is achieved by acceleration of the numerical procedure of solving the classical Kendall-Tak\'{a}cs equation. At the end I will identify open problems with regard to such systems; these open problems are mainly related to the modelling of switchover times.
Inference and optimal design for percolation and general random graph models (Part I)
09:30 Wed 8 Jun, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Andrei Bejan :: The University of Cambridge

The problem of optimal arrangement of nodes of a random weighted graph is discussed in this workshop. The nodes of graphs under study are fixed, but their edges are random and established according to the so called edge-probability function. This function is assumed to depend on the weights attributed to the pairs of graph nodes (or distances between them) and a statistical parameter. It is the purpose of experimentation to make inference on the statistical parameter and thus to extract as much information about it as possible. We also distinguish between two different experimentation scenarios: progressive and instructive designs.

We adopt a utility-based Bayesian framework to tackle the optimal design problem for random graphs of this kind. Simulation based optimisation methods, mainly Monte Carlo and Markov Chain Monte Carlo, are used to obtain the solution. We study optimal design problem for the inference based on partial observations of random graphs by employing data augmentation technique. We prove that the infinitely growing or diminishing node configurations asymptotically represent the worst node arrangements. We also obtain the exact solution to the optimal design problem for proximity (geometric) graphs and numerical solution for graphs with threshold edge-probability functions.

We consider inference and optimal design problems for finite clusters from bond percolation on the integer lattice $\mathbb{Z}^d$ and derive a range of both numerical and analytical results for these graphs. We introduce inner-outer plots by deleting some of the lattice nodes and show that the ëmostly populatedí designs are not necessarily optimal in the case of incomplete observations under both progressive and instructive design scenarios. Some of the obtained results may generalise to other lattices.

Inference and optimal design for percolation and general random graph models (Part II)
10:50 Wed 8 Jun, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Andrei Bejan :: The University of Cambridge

The problem of optimal arrangement of nodes of a random weighted graph is discussed in this workshop. The nodes of graphs under study are fixed, but their edges are random and established according to the so called edge-probability function. This function is assumed to depend on the weights attributed to the pairs of graph nodes (or distances between them) and a statistical parameter. It is the purpose of experimentation to make inference on the statistical parameter and thus to extract as much information about it as possible. We also distinguish between two different experimentation scenarios: progressive and instructive designs.

We adopt a utility-based Bayesian framework to tackle the optimal design problem for random graphs of this kind. Simulation based optimisation methods, mainly Monte Carlo and Markov Chain Monte Carlo, are used to obtain the solution. We study optimal design problem for the inference based on partial observations of random graphs by employing data augmentation technique. We prove that the infinitely growing or diminishing node configurations asymptotically represent the worst node arrangements. We also obtain the exact solution to the optimal design problem for proximity (geometric) graphs and numerical solution for graphs with threshold edge-probability functions.

We consider inference and optimal design problems for finite clusters from bond percolation on the integer lattice $\mathbb{Z}^d$ and derive a range of both numerical and analytical results for these graphs. We introduce inner-outer plots by deleting some of the lattice nodes and show that the ëmostly populatedí designs are not necessarily optimal in the case of incomplete observations under both progressive and instructive design scenarios. Some of the obtained results may generalise to other lattices.

Quantitative proteomics: data analysis and statistical challenges
10:10 Thu 30 Jun, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Peter Hoffmann :: Adelaide Proteomics Centre

Introduction to functional data analysis with applications to proteomics data
11:10 Thu 30 Jun, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: A/Prof Inge Koch :: School of Mathematical Sciences

Object oriented data analysis
14:10 Thu 30 Jun, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Steve Marron :: The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Object Oriented Data Analysis is the statistical analysis of populations of complex objects. In the special case of Functional Data Analysis, these data objects are curves, where standard Euclidean approaches, such as principal components analysis, have been very successful. Recent developments in medical image analysis motivate the statistical analysis of populations of more complex data objects which are elements of mildly non-Euclidean spaces, such as Lie Groups and Symmetric Spaces, or of strongly non-Euclidean spaces, such as spaces of tree-structured data objects. These new contexts for Object Oriented Data Analysis create several potentially large new interfaces between mathematics and statistics. Even in situations where Euclidean analysis makes sense, there are statistical challenges because of the High Dimension Low Sample Size problem, which motivates a new type of asymptotics leading to non-standard mathematical statistics.
Object oriented data analysis of tree-structured data objects
15:10 Fri 1 Jul, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Steve Marron :: The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The field of Object Oriented Data Analysis has made a lot of progress on the statistical analysis of the variation in populations of complex objects. A particularly challenging example of this type is populations of tree-structured objects. Deep challenges arise, which involve a marriage of ideas from statistics, geometry, and numerical analysis, because the space of trees is strongly non-Euclidean in nature. These challenges, together with three completely different approaches to addressing them, are illustrated using a real data example, where each data point is the tree of blood arteries in one person's brain.
Estimating disease prevalence in hidden populations
14:05 Wed 28 Sep, 2011 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Amber Tomas :: The University of Oxford

Estimating disease prevalence in "hidden" populations such as injecting drug users or men who have sex with men is an important public health issue. However, traditional design-based estimation methods are inappropriate because they assume that a list of all members of the population is available from which to select a sample. Respondent Driven Sampling (RDS) is a method developed over the last 15 years for sampling from hidden populations. Similarly to snowball sampling, it leverages the fact that members of hidden populations are often socially connected to one another. Although RDS is now used around the world, there are several common population characteristics which are known to cause estimates calculated from such samples to be significantly biased. In this talk I'll discuss the motivation for RDS, as well as some of the recent developments in methods of estimation.
Understanding the dynamics of event networks
15:00 Wed 28 Sep, 2011 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Amber Tomas :: The University of Oxford

Within many populations there are frequent communications between pairs of individuals. Such communications might be emails sent within a company, radio communications in a disaster zone or diplomatic communications between states. Often it is of interest to understand the factors that drive the observed patterns of such communications, or to study how these factors are changing over over time. Communications can be thought of as events occuring on the edges of a network which connects individuals in the population. In this talk I'll present a model for such communications which uses ideas from social network theory to account for the complex correlation structure between events. Applications to the Enron email corpus and the dynamics of hospital ward transfer patterns will be discussed.
Statistical modelling for some problems in bioinformatics
11:10 Fri 14 Oct, 2011 :: B.17 Ingkarni Wardli :: Professor Geoff McLachlan :: The University of Queensland

Media...
In this talk we consider some statistical analyses of data arising in bioinformatics. The problems include the detection of differential expression in microarray gene-expression data, the clustering of time-course gene-expression data and, lastly, the analysis of modern-day cytometric data. Extensions are considered to the procedures proposed for these three problems in McLachlan et al. (Bioinformatics, 2006), Ng et al. (Bioinformatics, 2006), and Pyne et al. (PNAS, 2009), respectively. The latter references are available at http://www.maths.uq.edu.au/~gjm/.
Evaluation and comparison of the performance of Australian and New Zealand intensive care units
14:10 Fri 25 May, 2012 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Jessica Kasza :: The University of Adelaide

Media...
Recently, the Australian Government has emphasised the need for monitoring and comparing the performance of Australian hospitals. Evaluating the performance of intensive care units (ICUs) is of particular importance, given that the most severe cases are treated in these units. Indeed, ICU performance can be thought of as a proxy for the overall performance of a hospital. We compare the performance of the ICUs contributing to the Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Society (ANZICS) Adult Patient Database, the largest of its kind in the world, and identify those ICUs with unusual performance. It is well-known that there are many statistical issues that must be accounted for in the evaluation of healthcare provider performance. Indicators of performance must be appropriately selected and estimated, investigators must adequately adjust for casemix, statistical variation must be fully accounted for, and adjustment for multiple comparisons must be made. Our basis for dealing with these issues is the estimation of a hierarchical logistic model for the in-hospital death of each patient, with patients clustered within ICUs. Both patient- and ICU-level covariates are adjusted for, with a random intercept and random coefficient for the APACHE III severity score. Given that we expect most ICUs to have similar performance after adjustment for these covariates, we follow Ohlssen et al., JRSS A (2007), and estimate a null model that we expect the majority of ICUs to follow. This methodology allows us to rigorously account for the aforementioned statistical issues, and accurately identify those ICUs contributing to the ANZICS database that have comparatively unusual performance. This is joint work with Prof. Patty Solomon and Assoc. Prof. John Moran.
Epidemiological consequences of household-based antiviral prophylaxis for pandemic influenza
14:10 Fri 8 Jun, 2012 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Joshua Ross :: The University of Adelaide

Media...
Antiviral treatment offers a fast acting alternative to vaccination. It is viewed as a first-line of defence against pandemic influenza, protecting families and household members once infection has been detected. In clinical trials antiviral treatment has been shown to be efficacious in preventing infection, limiting disease and reducing transmission, yet their impact at containing the 2009 influenza A(H1N1)pdm outbreak was limited. I will describe some of our work, which attempts to understand this seeming discrepancy, through the development of a general model and computationally efficient methodology for studying household-based interventions. This is joint work with Dr Andrew Black (Adelaide), and Prof. Matt Keeling and Dr Thomas House (Warwick, U.K.).
Multi-scale models of evolutionary epidemiology: where is HIV going?
14:00 Fri 19 Oct, 2012 :: Napier 205 :: Dr Lorenzo Pellis :: The University of Warwick

An important component of pathogen evolution at the population level is evolution within hosts, which can alter the composition of genotypes available for transmission as infection progresses. I will present a deterministic multi-scale model, linking the within-host competition dynamics with the transmission dynamics at a population level. I will take HIV as an example of how this framework can help clarify the conflicting evolutionary pressure an infectious disease might be subject to.
Epidemic models in socially structured populations: when are simple models too simple?
14:00 Thu 25 Oct, 2012 :: 5.56 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Lorenzo Pellis :: The University of Warwick

Both age and household structure are recognised as important heterogeneities affecting epidemic spread of infectious pathogens, and many models exist nowadays that include either or both forms of heterogeneity. However, different models may fit aggregate epidemic data equally well and nevertheless lead to different predictions of public health interest. I will here present an overview of stochastic epidemic models with increasing complexity in their social structure, focusing in particular on households models. For these models, I will present recent results about the definition and computation of the basic reproduction number R0 and its relationship with other threshold parameters. Finally, I will use these results to compare models with no, either or both age and household structure, with the aim of quantifying the conditions under which each form of heterogeneity is relevant and therefore providing some criteria that can be used to guide model design for real-time predictions.
Epidemic models in socially structured populations: when are simple models too simple?
14:00 Thu 25 Oct, 2012 :: 5.56 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Lorenzo Pellis :: The University of Warwick

Both age and household structure are recognised as important heterogeneities affecting epidemic spread of infectious pathogens, and many models exist nowadays that include either or both forms of heterogeneity. However, different models may fit aggregate epidemic data equally well and nevertheless lead to different predictions of public health interest. I will here present an overview of stochastic epidemic models with increasing complexity in their social structure, focusing in particular on households models. For these models, I will present recent results about the definition and computation of the basic reproduction number R0 and its relationship with other threshold parameters. Finally, I will use these results to compare models with no, either or both age and household structure, with the aim of quantifying the conditions under which each form of heterogeneity is relevant and therefore providing some criteria that can be used to guide model design for real-time predictions.
Exploration vs. Exploitation with Partially Observable Gaussian Autoregressive Arms
15:00 Mon 29 Sep, 2014 :: Engineering North N132 :: Julia Kuhn :: The University of Queensland & The University of Amsterdam

Media...
We consider a restless bandit problem with Gaussian autoregressive arms, where the state of an arm is only observed when it is played and the state-dependent reward is collected. Since arms are only partially observable, a good decision policy needs to account for the fact that information about the state of an arm becomes more and more obsolete while the arm is not being played. Thus, the decision maker faces a tradeoff between exploiting those arms that are believed to be currently the most rewarding (i.e. those with the largest conditional mean), and exploring arms with a high conditional variance. Moreover, one would like the decision policy to remain tractable despite the infinite state space and also in systems with many arms. A policy that gives some priority to exploration is the Whittle index policy, for which we establish structural properties. These motivate a parametric index policy that is computationally much simpler than the Whittle index but can still outperform the myopic policy. Furthermore, we examine the many-arm behavior of the system under the parametric policy, identifying equations describing its asymptotic dynamics. Based on these insights we provide a simple heuristic algorithm to evaluate the performance of index policies; the latter is used to optimize the parametric index.
Modelling segregation distortion in multi-parent crosses
15:00 Mon 17 Nov, 2014 :: 5.57 Ingkarni Wardli :: Rohan Shah (joint work with B. Emma Huang and Colin R. Cavanagh) :: The University of Queensland

Construction of high-density genetic maps has been made feasible by low-cost high-throughput genotyping technology; however, the process is still complicated by biological, statistical and computational issues. A major challenge is the presence of segregation distortion, which can be caused by selection, difference in fitness, or suppression of recombination due to introgressed segments from other species. Alien introgressions are common in major crop species, where they have often been used to introduce beneficial genes from wild relatives. Segregation distortion causes problems at many stages of the map construction process, including assignment to linkage groups and estimation of recombination fractions. This can result in incorrect ordering and estimation of map distances. While discarding markers will improve the resulting map, it may result in the loss of genomic regions under selection or containing beneficial genes (in the case of introgression). To correct for segregation distortion we model it explicitly in the estimation of recombination fractions. Previously proposed methods introduce additional parameters to model the distortion, with a corresponding increase in computing requirements. This poses difficulties for large, densely genotyped experimental populations. We propose a method imposing minimal additional computational burden which is suitable for high-density map construction in large multi-parent crosses. We demonstrate its use modelling the known Sr36 introgression in wheat for an eight-parent complex cross.
Topology Tomography with Spatial Dependencies
15:00 Tue 25 Nov, 2014 :: Engineering North N132 :: Darryl Veitch :: The University of Melbourne

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There has been quite a lot of tomography inference work on measurement networks with a tree topology. Here observations are made, at the leaves of the tree, of `probes' sent down from the root and copied at each branch point. Inference can be performed based on loss or delay information carried by probes, and used in order to recover loss parameters, delay parameters, or the topology, of the tree. In all of these a strong assumption of spatial independence between links in the tree has been made in prior work. I will describe recent work on topology inference, based on loss measurement, which breaks that assumption. In particular I will introduce a new model class for loss with non trivial spatial dependence, the `Jump Independent Models', which are well motivated, and prove that within this class the topology is identifiable.
Queues and cooperative games
15:00 Fri 18 Sep, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli B21 :: Moshe Haviv :: Department of Statistics and the Federmann Center for the Study of Rationality, The Hebrew Universit

Media...
The area of cooperative game theory deals with models in which a number of individuals, called players, can form coalitions so as to improve the utility of its members. In many cases, the formation of the grand coalition is a natural result of some negotiation or a bargaining procedure. The main question then is how the players should split the gains due to their cooperation among themselves. Various solutions have been suggested among them the Shapley value, the nucleolus and the core.

Servers in a queueing system can also join forces. For example, they can exchange service capacity among themselves or serve customers who originally seek service at their peers. The overall performance improves and the question is how they should split the gains, or, equivalently, how much each one of them needs to pay or be paid in order to cooperate with the others. Our major focus is in the core of the resulting cooperative game and in showing that in many queueing games the core is not empty.

Finally, customers who are served by the same server can also be looked at as players who form a grand coalition, now inflicting damage on each other in the form of additional waiting time. We show how cooperative game theory, specifically the Aumann-Shapley prices, leads to a way in which this damage can be attributed to individual customers or groups of customers.
Modelling Coverage in RNA Sequencing
09:00 Mon 9 Nov, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli 5.57 :: Arndt von Haeseler :: Max F Perutz Laboratories, University of Vienna

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RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) is the method of choice for measuring the expression of RNAs in a cell population. In an RNA-seq experiment, sequencing the full length of larger RNA molecules requires fragmentation into smaller pieces to be compatible with limited read lengths of most deep-sequencing technologies. Unfortunately, the issue of non-uniform coverage across a genomic feature has been a concern in RNA-seq and is attributed to preferences for certain fragments in steps of library preparation and sequencing. However, the disparity between the observed non-uniformity of read coverage in RNA-seq data and the assumption of expected uniformity elicits a query on the read coverage profile one should expect across a transcript, if there are no biases in the sequencing protocol. We propose a simple model of unbiased fragmentation where we find that the expected coverage profile is not uniform and, in fact, depends on the ratio of fragment length to transcript length. To compare the non-uniformity proposed by our model with experimental data, we extended this simple model to incorporate empirical attributes matching that of the sequenced transcript in an RNA-seq experiment. In addition, we imposed an experimentally derived distribution on the frequency at which fragment lengths occur.

We used this model to compare our theoretical prediction with experimental data and with the uniform coverage model. If time permits, we will also discuss a potential application of our model.
Use of epidemic models in optimal decision making
15:00 Thu 19 Nov, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli 5.57 :: Tim Kinyanjui :: School of Mathematics, The University of Manchester

Media...
Epidemic models have proved useful in a number of applications in epidemiology. In this work, I will present two areas that we have used modelling to make informed decisions. Firstly, we have used an age structured mathematical model to describe the transmission of Respiratory Syncytial Virus in a developed country setting and to explore different vaccination strategies. We found that delayed infant vaccination has significant potential in reducing the number of hospitalisations in the most vulnerable group and that most of the reduction is due to indirect protection. It also suggests that marked public health benefit could be achieved through RSV vaccine delivered to age groups not seen as most at risk of severe disease. The second application is in the optimal design of studies aimed at collection of household-stratified infection data. A design decision involves making a trade-off between the number of households to enrol and the sampling frequency. Two commonly used study designs are considered: cross-sectional and cohort. The search for an optimal design uses Bayesian methods to explore the joint parameter-design space combined with Shannon entropy of the posteriors to estimate the amount of information for each design. We found that for the cross-sectional designs, the amount of information increases with the sampling intensity while the cohort design often exhibits a trade-off between the number of households sampled and the intensity of follow-up. Our results broadly support the choices made in existing data collection studies.
A Semi-Markovian Modeling of Limit Order Markets
13:00 Fri 11 Dec, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli 5.57 :: Anatoliy Swishchuk :: University of Calgary

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R. Cont and A. de Larrard (SIAM J. Financial Mathematics, 2013) introduced a tractable stochastic model for the dynamics of a limit order book, computing various quantities of interest such as the probability of a price increase or the diffusion limit of the price process. As suggested by empirical observations, we extend their framework to 1) arbitrary distributions for book events inter-arrival times (possibly non-exponential) and 2) both the nature of a new book event and its corresponding inter-arrival time depend on the nature of the previous book event. We do so by resorting to Markov renewal processes to model the dynamics of the bid and ask queues. We keep analytical tractability via explicit expressions for the Laplace transforms of various quantities of interest. Our approach is justified and illustrated by calibrating the model to the five stocks Amazon, Apple, Google, Intel and Microsoft on June 21st 2012. As in Cont and Larrard, the bid-ask spread remains constant equal to one tick, only the bid and ask queues are modelled (they are independent from each other and get reinitialized after a price change), and all orders have the same size. (This talk is based on our joint paper with Nelson Vadori (Morgan Stanley)).
Mathematical modelling of the immune response to influenza
15:00 Thu 12 May, 2016 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Ada Yan :: University of Melbourne

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The immune response plays an important role in the resolution of primary influenza infection and prevention of subsequent infection in an individual. However, the relative roles of each component of the immune response in clearing infection, and the effects of interaction between components, are not well quantified.

We have constructed a model of the immune response to influenza based on data from viral interference experiments, where ferrets were exposed to two influenza strains within a short time period. The changes in viral kinetics of the second virus due to the first virus depend on the strains used as well as the interval between exposures, enabling inference of the timing of innate and adaptive immune response components and the role of cross-reactivity in resolving infection. Our model provides a mechanistic explanation for the observed variation in viruses' abilities to protect against subsequent infection at short inter-exposure intervals, either by delaying the second infection or inducing stochastic extinction of the second virus. It also explains the decrease in recovery time for the second infection when the two strains elicit cross-reactive cellular adaptive immune responses. To account for inter-subject as well as inter-virus variation, the model is formulated using a hierarchical framework. We will fit the model to experimental data using Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods; quantification of the model will enable a deeper understanding of the effects of potential new treatments.
SIR epidemics with stages of infection
12:10 Wed 28 Sep, 2016 :: EM218 :: Matthieu Simon :: Universite Libre de Bruxelles

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This talk is concerned with a stochastic model for the spread of an epidemic in a closed homogeneously mixing population. The population is subdivided into three classes of individuals: the susceptibles, the infectives and the removed cases. In short, an infective remains infectious during a random period of time. While infected, it can contact all the susceptibles present, independently of the other infectives. At the end of the infectious period, it becomes a removed case and has no further part in the infection process.

We represent an infectious period as a set of different stages that an infective can go through before being removed. The transitions between stages are ruled by either a Markov process or a semi-Markov process. In each stage, an infective makes contaminations at the epochs of a Poisson process with a specific rate.

Our purpose is to derive closed expressions for a transform of different statistics related to the end of the epidemic, such as the final number of susceptibles and the area under the trajectories of all the infectives. The analysis is performed by using simple matrix analytic methods and martingale arguments. Numerical illustrations will be provided at the end of the talk.
Transmission Dynamics of Visceral Leishmaniasis: designing a test and treat control strategy
12:10 Thu 29 Sep, 2016 :: EM218 :: Graham Medley :: London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

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Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL) is targeted for elimination from the Indian Sub-Continent. Progress has been much better in some areas than others. Current control is based on earlier diagnosis and treatment and on insecticide spraying to reduce the density of the vector. There is a surprising dearth of specific information on the epidemiology of VL, which makes modelling more difficult. In this seminar, I describe a simple framework that gives some insight into the transmission dynamics. We conclude that the majority of infection comes from cases prior to diagnosis. If this is the case then, early diagnosis will be advantageous, but will require a test with high specificity. This is a paradox for many clinicians and public health workers, who tend to prioritise high sensitivity.

Medley, G.F., Hollingsworth, T.D., Olliaro, P.L. & Adams, E.R. (2015) Health-seeking, diagnostics and transmission in the control of visceral leishmaniasis. Nature 528, S102-S108 (3 December 2015), DOI: 10.1038/nature16042
Stochastic Modelling of Urban Structure
11:10 Mon 20 Nov, 2017 :: Engineering Nth N132 :: Mark Girolami :: Imperial College London, and The Alan Turing Institute

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Urban systems are complex in nature and comprise of a large number of individuals that act according to utility, a measure of net benefit pertaining to preferences. The actions of individuals give rise to an emergent behaviour, creating the so-called urban structure that we observe. In this talk, I develop a stochastic model of urban structure to formally account for uncertainty arising from the complex behaviour. We further use this stochastic model to infer the components of a utility function from observed urban structure. This is a more powerful modelling framework in comparison to the ubiquitous discrete choice models that are of limited use for complex systems, in which the overall preferences of individuals are difficult to ascertain. We model urban structure as a realization of a Boltzmann distribution that is the invariant distribution of a related stochastic differential equation (SDE) that describes the dynamics of the urban system. Our specification of Boltzmann distribution assigns higher probability to stable configurations, in the sense that consumer surplus (demand) is balanced with running costs (supply), as characterized by a potential function. We specify a Bayesian hierarchical model to infer the components of a utility function from observed structure. Our model is doubly-intractable and poses significant computational challenges that we overcome using recent advances in Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods. We demonstrate our methodology with case studies on the London retail system and airports in England.

News matching "+Operations +research"

Potts Medal Winner
Professor Charles Pearce, the Elder Profesor of Mathematics, was awarded the Ren Potts Medal by the Australian Society for Operations Research at its annual meeting in December. This is a national award for outstanding contributions to Operations Research in Australia. Posted Tue 22 Jan 08.
Welcome to Dr Joshua Ross
We welcome Dr Joshua Ross as a new lecturer in the School of Mathematical Sciences. Joshua has moved over to Adelaide from the University of Cambridge. His research interests are mathematical modelling (especially mathematical biology) and operations research. Posted Mon 15 Mar 10.

More information...

Publications matching "+Operations +research"

Publications
On risk minimizing portfolios under a Markovian regime-switching Black-Scholes economy
Elliott, Robert; Siu, T, Annals of Operations Research 1 (1–21) 2009
Markovian trees: properties and algorithms
Bean, Nigel; Kontoleon, Nectarios; Taylor, Peter, Annals of Operations Research 160 (31–50) 2008
Performance measures of a multi-layer Markovian fluid model
Bean, Nigel; O'Reilly, Malgorzata, Annals of Operations Research 160 (99–120) 2008
Optimal recursive estimation of raw data
Torokhti, Anatoli; Howlett, P; Pearce, Charles, Annals of Operations Research 133 (285–302) 2005
The cross-entropy method for network reliability estimation
Hui, Kin-Ping; Bean, Nigel; Kraetzl, Miro; Kroese, D, Annals of Operations Research 134 (101–118) 2005
Arbitrage in a Discrete Version of the Wick-Fractional Black Scholes Model
Bender, C; Elliott, Robert, Mathematics of Operations Research 29 (935–945) 2004
Some new bounds for singular values and eigenvalues of matrix products
Lu, L-Z; Pearce, Charles, Annals of Operations Research 98 (141–148) 2001

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