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April 2018
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Dr David Green
Lecturer in Applied Mathematics


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Professor Tony Roberts
Professor of Applied Mathematics


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Courses matching "+Simulation +modelling"

Modelling and Simulation of Stochastic Systems

The course provides students with the skills to analyse and design systems using modelling and simulation techniques. Case studies will be undertaken involving hands-on use of simulation packages. The application of simulation in areas such as manufacturing, telecommunications and transport will be investigated. At the end of this course, students will be capable of identifying practical situations where simulation modelling can be helpful, reporting to management on how they would undertake such a project, collecting relevant data, building and validating a model, analysing the output and reporting their findings to management. Students complete a project in groups of two or three, write a concise summary of what they have done and report their findings to the class. The project report at the end of this course should be a substantial document that is a record of a student's practical ability in simulation modelling, which can also become part of a portfolio or CV. Topics covered are: Introduction to simulation, hand simulation, introduction to a simulation package, review of basic probabilty theory, introduction to random number generation, generation of random variates, anaylsis of simulation output, variance reduction techniques and basic analytic queeing models.

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Events matching "+Simulation +modelling"

Mathematical modelling of lobster populations in South Australia
12:10 Mon 12 Sep, 2011 :: 5.57 Ingkarni Wardli :: Mr John Feenstra :: University of Adelaide

Just how many lobsters are there hanging around the South Australian coastline? How is this number changing over time? What is the demographic breakdown of this number? And what does it matter? Find out the answers to these questions in my upcoming talk. I will provide a brief flavour of the kinds of quantitative methods involved, showcasing relevant applications of regression, population modelling, estimation, as well as simulation. A product of these analyses are biological performance indicators which are used by government to help decide on fishery controls such as yearly total allowable catch quotas. This assists in maintaining the sustainability of the fishery and hence benefits both the fishers and the lobsters they catch.
Progress in the prediction of buoyancy-affected turbulence
15:10 Fri 17 May, 2013 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Daniel Chung :: University of Melbourne

Media...
Buoyancy-affected turbulence represents a significant challenge to our understanding, yet it dominates many important flows that occur in the ocean and atmosphere. The presentation will highlight some recent progress in the characterisation, modelling and prediction of buoyancy-affected turbulence using direct and large-eddy simulations, along with implications for the characterisation of mixing in the ocean and the low-cloud feedback in the atmosphere. Specifically, direct numerical simulation data of stratified turbulence will be employed to highlight the importance of boundaries in the characterisation of turbulent mixing in the ocean. Then, a subgrid-scale model that captures the anisotropic character of stratified mixing will be developed for large-eddy simulation of buoyancy-affected turbulence. Finally, the subgrid-scale model is utilised to perform a systematic large-eddy simulation investigation of the archetypal low-cloud regimes, from which the link between the lower-tropospheric stability criterion and the cloud fraction interpreted.
Multiscale modelling couples patches of wave-like simulations
12:10 Mon 27 May, 2013 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Meng Cao :: University of Adelaide

Media...
A multiscale model is proposed to significantly reduce the expensive numerical simulations of complicated waves over large spatial domains. The multiscale model is built from given microscale simulations of complicated physical processes such as sea ice or turbulent shallow water. Our long term aim is to enable macroscale simulations obtained by coupling small patches of simulations together over large physical distances. This initial work explores the coupling of patch simulations of wave-like pdes. With the line of development being to water waves we discuss the dynamics of two complementary fields called the 'depth' h and 'velocity' u. A staggered grid is used for the microscale simulation of the depth h and velocity u. We introduce a macroscale staggered grid to couple the microscale patches. Linear or quadratic interpolation provides boundary conditions on the field in each patch. Linear analysis of the whole coupled multiscale system establishes that the resultant macroscale dynamics is appropriate. Numerical simulations support the linear analysis. This multiscale method should empower the feasible computation of large scale simulations of wave-like dynamics with complicated underlying physics.
The effects of pre-existing immunity
15:10 Fri 7 Mar, 2014 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: Associate Professor Jane Heffernan :: York University, Canada

Media...
Immune system memory, also called immunity, is gained as a result of primary infection or vaccination, and can be boosted after vaccination or secondary infections. Immunity is developed so that the immune system is primed to react and fight a pathogen earlier and more effectively in secondary infections. The effects of memory, however, on pathogen propagation in an individual host (in-host) and a population (epidemiology) are not well understood. Mathematical models of infectious diseases, employing dynamical systems, computer simulation and bifurcation analysis, can provide projections of pathogen propagation, show outcomes of infection and help inform public health interventions. In the Modelling Infection and Immunity (MI^2) lab, we develop and study biologically informed mathematical models of infectious diseases at both levels of infection, and combine these models into comprehensive multi-scale models so that the effects of individual immunity in a population can be determined. In this talk we will discuss some of the interesting mathematical phenomenon that arise in our models, and show how our results are directly applicable to what is known about the persistence of infectious diseases.
Group meeting
15:10 Fri 6 Jun, 2014 :: 5.58 Ingkarni Wardli :: Meng Cao and Trent Mattner :: University of Adelaide

Meng Cao:: Multiscale modelling couples patches of nonlinear wave-like simulations :: Abstract: The multiscale gap-tooth scheme is built from given microscale simulations of complicated physical processes to empower macroscale simulations. By coupling small patches of simulations over unsimulated physical gaps, large savings in computational time are possible. So far the gap-tooth scheme has been developed for dissipative systems, but wave systems are also of great interest. This article develops the gap-tooth scheme to the case of nonlinear microscale simulations of wave-like systems. Classic macroscale interpolation provides a generic coupling between patches that achieves arbitrarily high order consistency between the multiscale scheme and the underlying microscale dynamics. Eigen-analysis indicates that the resultant gap-tooth scheme empowers feasible computation of large scale simulations of wave-like dynamics with complicated underlying physics. As an pilot study, we implement numerical simulations of dam-breaking waves by the gap-tooth scheme. Comparison between a gap-tooth simulation, a microscale simulation over the whole domain, and some published experimental data on dam breaking, demonstrates that the gap-tooth scheme feasibly computes large scale wave-like dynamics with computational savings. Trent Mattner :: Coupled atmosphere-fire simulations of the Canberra 2003 bushfires using WRF-Sfire :: Abstract: The Canberra fires of January 18, 2003 are notorious for the extreme fire behaviour and fire-atmosphere-topography interactions that occurred, including lee-slope fire channelling, pyrocumulonimbus development and tornado formation. In this talk, I will discuss coupled fire-weather simulations of the Canberra fires using WRF-SFire. In these simulations, a fire-behaviour model is used to dynamically predict the evolution of the fire front according to local atmospheric and topographic conditions, as well as the associated heat and moisture fluxes to the atmosphere. It is found that the predicted fire front and heat flux is not too bad, bearing in mind the complexity of the problem and the severe modelling assumptions made. However, the predicted moisture flux is too low, which has some impact on atmospheric dynamics.
Behavioural Microsimulation Approach to Social Policy and Behavioural Economics
15:10 Fri 20 May, 2016 :: S112 Engineering South :: Dr Drew Mellor :: Ernst & Young

SIMULAIT is a general purpose, behavioural micro-simulation system designed to predict behavioural trends in human populations. This type of predictive capability grew out of original research initially conducted in conjunction with the Defence Science and Technology Group (DSTO) in South Australia, and has been fully commercialised and is in current use by a global customer base. To our customers, the principal value of the system lies in its ability to predict likely outcomes to scenarios that challenge conventional approaches based on extrapolation or generalisation. These types of scenarios include: the impact of disruptive technologies, such as the impact of wide-spread adoption of autonomous vehicles for transportation or batteries for household energy storage; and the impact of effecting policy elements or interventions, such as the impact of imposing water usage restrictions. SIMULAIT employs a multi-disciplinary methodology, drawing from agent-based modelling, behavioural science and psychology, microeconomics, artificial intelligence, simulation, game theory, engineering, mathematics and statistics. In this seminar, we start with a high-level view of the system followed by a look under the hood to see how the various elements come together to answer questions about behavioural trends. The talk will conclude with a case study of a recent application of SIMULAIT to a significant policy problem - how to address the deficiency of STEM skilled teachers in the Victorian teaching workforce.

News matching "+Simulation +modelling"

Success in Learning and Teaching Grants
The School of Mathematical Sciences has been awarded two Faculty L&T awards. Congratulations to Dr David Green for his successful grant "One Simulation Modelling Instruction Module" and to Drs Adrian Koerber, Paul McCann and Jim Denier for their successful grant "Graphics Calculators and beyond". Posted Tue 11 Mar 08.
ARC Grant Success
Congratulations to the following staff who were successful in securing funding from the Australian Research Council Discovery Projects Scheme. Associate Professor Finnur Larusson awarded $270,000 for his project Flexibility and symmetry in complex geometry; Dr Thomas Leistner, awarded $303,464 for his project Holonomy groups in Lorentzian geometry, Professor Michael Murray Murray and Dr Daniel Stevenson (Glasgow), awarded $270,000 for their project Bundle gerbes: generalisations and applications; Professor Mathai Varghese, awarded $105,000 for his project Advances in index theory and Prof Anthony Roberts and Professor Ioannis Kevrekidis (Princeton) awarded $330,000 for their project Accurate modelling of large multiscale dynamical systems for engineering and scientific simulation and analysis Posted Tue 8 Nov 11.

Publications matching "+Simulation +modelling"

Publications
The Mekong-applications of value at risk (VAR) and conditional value at risk (CVAR) simulation to the benefits, costs and consequences of water resources development in a large river basin
Webby, Roger; Adamson, Peter; Boland, J; Howlett, P; Metcalfe, Andrew; Piantadosi, J, Ecological Modelling 201 (89–96) 2007
The modelling and numerical simulation of causal non-linear systems
Howlett, P; Torokhti, Anatoli; Pearce, Charles, Nonlinear Analysis-Theory Methods & Applications 47 (5559–5572) 2001

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