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People matching "+Stochastic +modelling"

Professor Robert Elliott
Adjunct Professor


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Professor Tony Roberts
Professor of Applied Mathematics


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Associate Professor Joshua Ross
Senior Lecturer in Applied Mathematics


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Courses matching "+Stochastic +modelling"

Modelling and Simulation of Stochastic Systems

The course provides students with the skills to analyse and design systems using modelling and simulation techniques. Case studies will be undertaken involving hands-on use of simulation packages. The application of simulation in areas such as manufacturing, telecommunications and transport will be investigated. At the end of this course, students will be capable of identifying practical situations where simulation modelling can be helpful, reporting to management on how they would undertake such a project, collecting relevant data, building and validating a model, analysing the output and reporting their findings to management. Students complete a project in groups of two or three, write a concise summary of what they have done and report their findings to the class. The project report at the end of this course should be a substantial document that is a record of a student's practical ability in simulation modelling, which can also become part of a portfolio or CV. Topics covered are: Introduction to simulation, hand simulation, introduction to a simulation package, review of basic probabilty theory, introduction to random number generation, generation of random variates, anaylsis of simulation output, variance reduction techniques and basic analytic queeing models.

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Events matching "+Stochastic +modelling"

Global and Local stationary modelling in finance: Theory and empirical evidence
14:10 Thu 10 Apr, 2008 :: G04 Napier Building University of Adelaide :: Prof. Dominique Guégan :: Universite Paris 1 Pantheon-Sorbonne

To model real data sets using second order stochastic processes imposes that the data sets verify the second order stationarity condition. This stationarity condition concerns the unconditional moments of the process. It is in that context that most of models developed from the sixties' have been studied; We refer to the ARMA processes (Brockwell and Davis, 1988), the ARCH, GARCH and EGARCH models (Engle, 1982, Bollerslev, 1986, Nelson, 1990), the SETAR process (Lim and Tong, 1980 and Tong, 1990), the bilinear model (Granger and Andersen, 1978, Guégan, 1994), the EXPAR model (Haggan and Ozaki, 1980), the long memory process (Granger and Joyeux, 1980, Hosking, 1981, Gray, Zang and Woodward, 1989, Beran, 1994, Giraitis and Leipus, 1995, Guégan, 2000), the switching process (Hamilton, 1988). For all these models, we get an invertible causal solution under specific conditions on the parameters, then the forecast points and the forecast intervals are available.

Thus, the stationarity assumption is the basis for a general asymptotic theory for identification, estimation and forecasting. It guarantees that the increase of the sample size leads to more and more information of the same kind which is basic for an asymptotic theory to make sense.

Now non-stationarity modelling has also a long tradition in econometrics. This one is based on the conditional moments of the data generating process. It appears mainly in the heteroscedastic and volatility models, like the GARCH and related models, and stochastic volatility processes (Ghysels, Harvey and Renault 1997). This non-stationarity appears also in a different way with structural changes models like the switching models (Hamilton, 1988), the stopbreak model (Diebold and Inoue, 2001, Breidt and Hsu, 2002, Granger and Hyung, 2004) and the SETAR models, for instance. It can also be observed from linear models with time varying coefficients (Nicholls and Quinn, 1982, Tsay, 1987).

Thus, using stationary unconditional moments suggest a global stationarity for the model, but using non-stationary unconditional moments or non-stationary conditional moments or assuming existence of states suggest that this global stationarity fails and that we only observe a local stationary behavior.

The growing evidence of instability in the stochastic behavior of stocks, of exchange rates, of some economic data sets like growth rates for instance, characterized by existence of volatility or existence of jumps in the variance or on the levels of the prices imposes to discuss the assumption of global stationarity and its consequence in modelling, particularly in forecasting. Thus we can address several questions with respect to these remarks.

1. What kinds of non-stationarity affect the major financial and economic data sets? How to detect them?

2. Local and global stationarities: How are they defined?

3. What is the impact of evidence of non-stationarity on the statistics computed from the global non stationary data sets?

4. How can we analyze data sets in the non-stationary global framework? Does the asymptotic theory work in non-stationary framework?

5. What kind of models create local stationarity instead of global stationarity? How can we use them to develop a modelling and a forecasting strategy?

These questions began to be discussed in some papers in the economic literature. For some of these questions, the answers are known, for others, very few works exist. In this talk I will discuss all these problems and will propose 2 new stategies and modelling to solve them. Several interesting topics in empirical finance awaiting future research will also be discussed.

Modelling and pricing for portfolio credit derivatives
15:10 Fri 16 Oct, 2009 :: MacBeth Lecture Theatre :: Dr Ben Hambly :: University of Oxford

The current financial crisis has been in part precipitated by the growth of complex credit derivatives and their mispricing. This talk will discuss some of the background to the `credit crunch', as well as the models and methods used currently. We will then develop an alternative view of large basket credit derivatives, as functions of a stochastic partial differential equation, which addresses some of the shortcomings.
Modelling of Hydrological Persistence in the Murray-Darling Basin for the Management of Weirs
12:10 Mon 4 Apr, 2011 :: 5.57 Ingkarni Wardli :: Aiden Fisher :: University of Adelaide

The lakes and weirs along the lower Murray River in Australia are aggregated and considered as a sequence of five reservoirs. A seasonal Markov chain model for the system will be implemented, and a stochastic dynamic program will be used to find optimal release strategies, in terms of expected monetary value (EMV), for the competing demands on the water resource given the stochastic nature of inflows. Matrix analytic methods will be used to analyse the system further, and in particular enable the full distribution of first passage times between any groups of states to be calculated. The full distribution of first passage times can be used to provide a measure of the risk associated with optimum EMV strategies, such as conditional value at risk (CVaR). The sensitivity of the model, and risk, to changing rainfall scenarios will be investigated. The effect of decreasing the level of discretisation of the reservoirs will be explored. Also, the use of matrix analytic methods facilitates the use of hidden states to allow for hydrological persistence in the inflows. Evidence for hydrological persistence of inflows to the lower Murray system, and the effect of making allowance for this, will be discussed.
Mathematical modelling of the immune response to influenza
15:00 Thu 12 May, 2016 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Ada Yan :: University of Melbourne

Media...
The immune response plays an important role in the resolution of primary influenza infection and prevention of subsequent infection in an individual. However, the relative roles of each component of the immune response in clearing infection, and the effects of interaction between components, are not well quantified.

We have constructed a model of the immune response to influenza based on data from viral interference experiments, where ferrets were exposed to two influenza strains within a short time period. The changes in viral kinetics of the second virus due to the first virus depend on the strains used as well as the interval between exposures, enabling inference of the timing of innate and adaptive immune response components and the role of cross-reactivity in resolving infection. Our model provides a mechanistic explanation for the observed variation in viruses' abilities to protect against subsequent infection at short inter-exposure intervals, either by delaying the second infection or inducing stochastic extinction of the second virus. It also explains the decrease in recovery time for the second infection when the two strains elicit cross-reactive cellular adaptive immune responses. To account for inter-subject as well as inter-virus variation, the model is formulated using a hierarchical framework. We will fit the model to experimental data using Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods; quantification of the model will enable a deeper understanding of the effects of potential new treatments.
Modelling evolution of post-menopausal human longevity: The Grandmother Hypothesis
15:10 Fri 2 Sep, 2016 :: Napier G03 :: Dr Peter Kim :: University of Sydney

Media...
Human post-menopausal longevity makes us unique among primates, but how did it evolve? One explanation, the Grandmother Hypothesis, proposes that as grasslands spread in ancient Africa displacing foods ancestral youngsters could effectively exploit, older females whose fertility was declining left more descendants by subsidizing grandchildren and allowing mothers to have new babies sooner. As more robust elders could help more descendants, selection favoured increased longevity while maintaining the ancestral end of female fertility. We develop a probabilistic agent-based model that incorporates two sexes and mating, fertility-longevity tradeoffs, and the possibility of grandmother help. Using this model, we show how the grandmother effect could have driven the evolution of human longevity. Simulations reveal two stable life-histories, one human-like and the other like our nearest cousins, the great apes. The probabilistic formulation shows how stochastic effects can slow down and prevent escape from the ancestral condition, and it allows us to investigate the effect of mutation rates on the trajectory of evolution.
Stochastic Modelling of Urban Structure
11:10 Mon 20 Nov, 2017 :: Engineering Nth N132 :: Mark Girolami :: Imperial College London, and The Alan Turing Institute

Media...
Urban systems are complex in nature and comprise of a large number of individuals that act according to utility, a measure of net benefit pertaining to preferences. The actions of individuals give rise to an emergent behaviour, creating the so-called urban structure that we observe. In this talk, I develop a stochastic model of urban structure to formally account for uncertainty arising from the complex behaviour. We further use this stochastic model to infer the components of a utility function from observed urban structure. This is a more powerful modelling framework in comparison to the ubiquitous discrete choice models that are of limited use for complex systems, in which the overall preferences of individuals are difficult to ascertain. We model urban structure as a realization of a Boltzmann distribution that is the invariant distribution of a related stochastic differential equation (SDE) that describes the dynamics of the urban system. Our specification of Boltzmann distribution assigns higher probability to stable configurations, in the sense that consumer surplus (demand) is balanced with running costs (supply), as characterized by a potential function. We specify a Bayesian hierarchical model to infer the components of a utility function from observed structure. Our model is doubly-intractable and poses significant computational challenges that we overcome using recent advances in Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods. We demonstrate our methodology with case studies on the London retail system and airports in England.

Publications matching "+Stochastic +modelling"

Publications
Stochastic cyclone modelling in the Bay of Bengal
Need, Steven; Lambert, Martin; Metcalfe, Andrew; Sen, D, Water Down Under 2008, Adelaide 14/04/08
Deterministic and stochastic modelling of endosome escape by Staphylococcus aureus: "quorum" sensing by a single bacterium
Koerber, Adrian; King, J; Williams, P, Journal of Mathematical Biology 50 (440–488) 2005
Stochastic modelling of tidal anomaly for estimation of flood risk in coastal areas
Ahmer, Ingrid; Lambert, Martin; Leonard, Michael; Metcalfe, Andrew, 28th International Hydrology and Water Resources Symposium, Wollongong, NSW, Australia 10/11/03
Bivariate stochastic modelling of ephemeral streamflow
Cigizoglu, H; Adamson, Peter; Metcalfe, Andrew, Hydrological Processes 16 (1451–1465) 2002
The exact solution of the general stochastic rumour
Pearce, Charles, Mathematical and Computer Modelling 31 (289–298) 2000

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