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Events matching "An Oka principle for equivariant isomorphisms"

Symmetry-breaking and the Origin of Species
15:10 Fri 24 Oct, 2008 :: G03 Napier Building University of Adelaide :: Toby Elmhirst :: ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University

The theory of partial differential equations can say much about generic bifurcations from spatially homogeneous steady states, but relatively little about generic bifurcations from unimodal steady states. In many applications, spatially homogeneous steady states correspond to low-energy physical states that are destabilized as energy is fed into the system, and in these cases standard PDE theory can yield some impressive and elegant results. However, for many macroscopic biological systems such results are less useful because low-energy states do not hold the same priviledged position as they do in physical and chemical systems. For example, speciation -- the evolutionary process by which new species are formed -- can be seen as the destabilization of a unimodal density distribution over phenotype space. Given the diversity of species and environments, generic results are clearly needed, but cannot be gained from PDE theory. Indeed, such questions cannot even be adequately formulated in terms of PDEs. In this talk I will introduce 'Pod Systems' which can provide an answer to the question; 'What happens, generically, when a unimodal steady state loses stability?' In the pod system formalization, the answer involves elements of equivariant bifurcation theory and suggests that new species can arise as the result of broken symmetries.
Noncommutative geometry of odd-dimensional quantum spheres
13:10 Fri 27 Feb, 2009 :: School Board Room :: Dr Partha Chakraborty :: University of Adelaide

We will report on our attempts to understand noncommutative geometry in the lights of the example of quantum spheres. We will see how to produce an equivariant fundamental class and also indicate some of the limitations of isospectral deformations.
Unsolvable problems in mathematics
15:10 Fri 3 Jul, 2009 :: Badger Labs G13 Macbeth Lecture Theatre :: Prof Greg Hjorth :: University of Melbourne

In the 1900 International Congress of Mathematicians David Hilbert proposed a list of 23 landmark mathematical problems. The first of these problems was shown by Paul Cohen in 1963 to be undecidable—which is to say, in informal language, that it was in principle completely unsolvable. The tenth problem was shown by Yuri Matiyasevich to be unsolvable in 1970. These developments would very likely have been profoundly surprising, perhaps even disturbing, to Hilbert. I want to review some of the general history of unsolvable problems. As much as reasonably possible in the time allowed, I hope to give the audience a sense of why the appearance of unsolvable problems in mathematics was inevitable, and perhaps even desirable.
A solution to the Gromov-Vaserstein problem
15:10 Fri 29 Jan, 2010 :: Engineering North N 158 Chapman Lecture Theatre :: Prof Frank Kutzschebauch :: University of Berne, Switzerland

Any matrix in $SL_n (\mathbb C)$ can be written as a product of elementary matrices using the Gauss elimination process. If instead of the field of complex numbers, the entries in the matrix are elements of a more general ring, this becomes a delicate question. In particular, rings of complex-valued functions on a space are interesting cases. A deep result of Suslin gives an affirmative answer for the polynomial ring in $m$ variables in case the size $n$ of the matrix is at least 3. In the topological category, the problem was solved by Thurston and Vaserstein. For holomorphic functions on $\mathbb C^m$, the problem was posed by Gromov in the 1980s. We report on a complete solution to Gromov's problem. A main tool is the Oka-Grauert-Gromov h-principle in complex analysis. Our main theorem can be formulated as follows: In the absence of obvious topological obstructions, the Gauss elimination process can be performed in a way that depends holomorphically on the matrix. This is joint work with Bj\"orn Ivarsson.
Loop groups and characteristic classes
13:10 Fri 23 Apr, 2010 :: School Board Room :: Dr Raymond Vozzo :: University of Adelaide

Suppose $G$ is a compact Lie group, $LG$ its (free) loop group and $\Omega G \subseteq LG$ its based loop group. Let $P \to M$ be a principal bundle with structure group one of these loop groups. In general, differential form representatives of characteristic classes for principal bundles can be easily obtained using the Chern-Weil homomorphism, however for infinite-dimensional bundles such as $P$ this runs into analytical problems and classes are more difficult to construct. In this talk I will explain some new results on characteristic classes for loop group bundles which demonstrate how to construct certain classes---which we call string classes---for such bundles. These are obtained by making heavy use of a certain $G$-bundle associated to any loop group bundle (which allows us to avoid the problems of dealing with infinite-dimensional bundles). We shall see that the free loop group case naturally involves equivariant cohomology.
The caloron transform
13:10 Fri 7 May, 2010 :: School Board Room :: Prof Michael Murray :: University of Adelaide

The caloron transform is a `fake' dimensional reduction which transforms a G-bundle over certain manifolds to a loop group of G bundle over a manifold of one lower dimension. This talk will review the caloron transform and show how it can be best understood using the language of pseudo-isomorphisms from category theory as well as considering its application to Bogomolny monopoles and string structures.
A polyhedral model for boron nitride nanotubes
15:10 Fri 3 Sep, 2010 :: Napier G04 :: Dr Barry Cox :: University of Adelaide

The conventional rolled-up model of nanotubes does not apply to the very small radii tubes, for which curvature effects become significant. In this talk an existing geometric model for carbon nanotubes proposed by the authors, which accommodates this deficiency and which is based on the exact polyhedral cylindrical structure, is extended to a nanotube structure involving two species of atoms in equal proportion, and in particular boron nitride nanotubes. This generalisation allows the principle features to be included as the fundamental assumptions of the model, such as equal bond length but distinct bond angles and radii between the two species. The polyhedral model is based on the five simple geometric assumptions: (i) all bonds are of equal length, (ii) all bond angles for the boron atoms are equal, (iii) all boron atoms lie at an equal distance from the nanotube axis, (iv) all nitrogen atoms lie at an equal distance from the nanotube axis, and (v) there exists a fixed ratio of pyramidal height H, between the boron species compared with the corresponding height in a symmetric single species nanotube. Working from these postulates, expressions are derived for the various structural parameters such as radii and bond angles for the two species for specific values of the chiral vector numbers (n,m). The new model incorporates an additional constant of proportionality H, which we assume applies to all nanotubes comprising the same elements and is such that H = 1 for a single species nanotube. Comparison with `ab initio' studies suggest that this assumption is entirely reasonable, and in particular we determine the value H = 0.56\pm0.04 for boron nitride, based on computational results in the literature. This talk relates to work which is a couple of years old and given time at the end we will discuss some newer results in geometric models developed with our former student Richard Lee (now also at the University of Adelaide as a post doc) and some work-in-progress on carbon nanocones. Note: pyramidal height is our own terminology and will be explained in the talk.
A strong Oka principle for embeddings of some planar domains into CxC*, I
13:10 Fri 6 May, 2011 :: Mawson 208 :: Mr Tyson Ritter :: University of Adelaide

The Oka principle refers to a collection of results in complex analysis which state that there are only topological obstructions to solving certain holomorphically defined problems involving Stein manifolds. For example, a basic version of Gromov's Oka principle states that every continuous map from a Stein manifold into an elliptic complex manifold is homotopic to a holomorphic map. In these two talks I will discuss a new result showing that if we restrict the class of source manifolds to circular domains and fix the target as CxC* we can obtain a much stronger Oka principle: every continuous map from a circular domain S into CxC* is homotopic to a proper holomorphic embedding. This result has close links with the long-standing and difficult problem of finding proper holomorphic embeddings of Riemann surfaces into C^2, with additional motivation from other sources.
A strong Oka principle for embeddings of some planar domains into CxC*, II
13:10 Fri 13 May, 2011 :: Mawson 208 :: Mr Tyson Ritter :: University of Adelaide

The Oka principle refers to a collection of results in complex analysis which state that there are only topological obstructions to solving certain holomorphically defined problems involving Stein manifolds. For example, a basic version of Gromov's Oka principle states that every continuous map from a Stein manifold into an elliptic complex manifold is homotopic to a holomorphic map. In these two talks I will discuss a new result showing that if we restrict the class of source manifolds to circular domains and fix the target as CxC* we can obtain a much stronger Oka principle: every continuous map from a circular domain S into CxC* is homotopic to a proper holomorphic embedding. This result has close links with the long-standing and difficult problem of finding proper holomorphic embeddings of Riemann surfaces into C^2, with additional motivation from other sources.
AustMS/AMSI Mahler Lecture: Chaos, quantum mechanics and number theory
18:00 Tue 9 Aug, 2011 :: Napier 102 :: Prof Peter Sarnak :: Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton

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The correspondence principle in quantum mechanics is concerned with the relation between a mechanical system and its quantization. When the mechanical system are relatively orderly ("integrable"), then this relation is well understood. However when the system is chaotic much less is understood. The key features already appear and are well illustrated in the simplest systems which we will review. For chaotic systems defined number-theoretically, much more is understood and the basic problems are connected with central questions in number theory. The Mahler lectures are a biennial activity organised by the Australian Mathematical Society with the assistance of the Australian Mathematical Sciences Institute.
Plurisubharmonic subextensions as envelopes of disc functionals
13:10 Fri 2 Mar, 2012 :: B.20 Ingkarni Wardli :: A/Prof Finnur Larusson :: University of Adelaide

I will describe new joint work with Evgeny Poletsky. We prove a disc formula for the largest plurisubharmonic subextension of an upper semicontinuous function on a domain $W$ in a Stein manifold to a larger domain $X$ under suitable conditions on $W$ and $X$. We introduce a related equivalence relation on the space of analytic discs in $X$ with boundary in $W$. The quotient is a complex manifold with a local biholomorphism to $X$, except it need not be Hausdorff. We use our disc formula to generalise Kiselman's minimum principle. We show that his infimum function is an example of a plurisubharmonic subextension.
Noncommutative geometry and conformal geometry
13:10 Fri 24 Aug, 2012 :: Engineering North 218 :: Dr Hang Wang :: Tsinghua University

In this talk, we shall use noncommutative geometry to obtain an index theorem in conformal geometry. This index theorem follows from an explicit and geometric computation of the Connes-Chern character of the spectral triple in conformal geometry, which was introduced recently by Connes and Moscovici. This (twisted) spectral triple encodes the geometry of the group of conformal diffeomorphisms on a spin manifold. The crux of of this construction is the conformal invariance of the Dirac operator. As a result, the Connes-Chern character is intimately related to the CM cocycle of an equivariant Dirac spectral triple. We compute this equivariant CM cocycle by heat kernel techniques. On the way we obtain a new heat kernel proof of the equivariant index theorem for Dirac operators. (Joint work with Raphael Ponge.)
Geometric quantisation in the noncompact setting
13:10 Fri 14 Sep, 2012 :: Engineering North 218 :: Dr Peter Hochs :: Leibniz University, Hannover

Traditionally, the geometric quantisation of an action by a compact Lie group on a compact symplectic manifold is defined as the equivariant index of a certain Dirac operator. This index is a well-defined formal difference of finite-dimensional representations, since the Dirac operator is elliptic and the manifold and the group in question are compact. From a mathematical and physical point of view however, it is very desirable to extend geometric quantisation to noncompact groups and manifolds. Defining a suitable index is much harder in the noncompact setting, but several interesting results in this direction have been obtained. I will review the difficulties connected to noncompact geometric quantisation, and some of the solutions that have been proposed so far, mainly in connection to the "quantisation commutes with reduction" principle. (An introduction to this principle will be given in my talk at the Colloquium on the same day.)
Quantisation commutes with reduction
15:10 Fri 14 Sep, 2012 :: B.20 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Peter Hochs :: Leibniz University Hannover

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The "Quantisation commutes with reduction" principle is an idea from physics, which has powerful applications in mathematics. It basically states that the ways in which symmetry can be used to simplify a physical system in classical and quantum mechanics, are compatible. This provides a strong link between the areas in mathematics used to describe symmetry in classical and quantum mechanics: symplectic geometry and representation theory, respectively. It has been proved in the 1990s that quantisation indeed commutes with reduction, under the important assumption that all spaces and symmetry groups involved are compact. This talk is an introduction to this principle and, if time permits, its mathematical relevance.
An Oka principle for equivariant isomorphisms
12:10 Fri 3 May, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B19 :: A/Prof Finnur Larusson :: University of Adelaide

I will discuss new joint work with Frank Kutzschebauch (Bern) and Gerald Schwarz (Brandeis). Let $G$ be a reductive complex Lie group acting holomorphically on Stein manifolds $X$ and $Y$, which are locally $G$-biholomorphic over a common categorical quotient $Q$. When is there a global $G$-biholomorphism $X\to Y$? In a situation that we describe, with some justification, as generic, we prove that the obstruction to solving this local-to-global problem is topological and provide sufficient conditions for it to vanish. Our main tool is the equivariant version of Grauert's Oka principle due to Heinzner and Kutzschebauch. We prove that $X$ and $Y$ are $G$-biholomorphic if $X$ is $K$-contractible, where $K$ is a maximal compact subgroup of $G$, or if there is a $G$-diffeomorphism $X\to Y$ over $Q$, which is holomorphic when restricted to each fibre of the quotient map $X\to Q$. When $G$ is abelian, we obtain stronger theorems. Our results can be interpreted as instances of the Oka principle for sections of the sheaf of $G$-biholomorphisms from $X$ to $Y$ over $Q$. This sheaf can be badly singular, even in simply defined examples. Our work is in part motivated by the linearisation problem for actions on $\C^n$. It follows from one of our main results that a holomorphic $G$-action on $\C^n$, which is locally $G$-biholomorphic over a common quotient to a generic linear action, is linearisable.
A strong Oka principle for proper immersions of finitely connected planar domains into CxC*
12:10 Fri 31 May, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B19 :: Dr Tyson Ritter :: University of Adelaide

Gromov, in his seminal 1989 paper on the Oka principle, proved that every continuous map from a Stein manifold into an elliptic manifold is homotopic to a holomorphic map. In previous work we showed that, given a continuous map from X to the elliptic manifold CxC*, where X is a finitely connected planar domain without isolated boundary points, a stronger Oka property holds whereby the map is homotopic to a proper holomorphic embedding. If the planar domain is additionally permitted to have isolated boundary points the problem becomes more difficult, and it is not yet clear whether a strong Oka property for embeddings into CxC* continues to hold. We will discuss recent results showing that every continuous map from a finitely connected planar domain into CxC* is homotopic to a proper immersion that, in most cases, identifies at most finitely many pairs of distinct points. This is joint work with Finnur Larusson.
Subfactors and twisted equivariant K-theory
12:10 Fri 2 Aug, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B19 :: Prof David E. Evans :: Cardiff University

The most basic structure of chiral conformal field theory (CFT) is the Verlinde ring. Freed-Hopkins-Teleman have expressed the Verlinde ring for the CFTs associated to loop groups as twisted equivariant K-theory. In joint work with Terry Gannon, we build on their work to express K-theoretically the structures of full CFT. In particular, the modular invariant partition functions (which essentially parametrise the possible full CFTs) have a rich interpretation within von Neumann algebras (subfactors), which has led to the developments of structures of full CFT such as the full system (fusion ring of defect lines), nimrep (cylindrical partition function), alpha-induction etc.
Weak Stochastic Maximum Principle (SMP) and Applications
15:10 Thu 12 Dec, 2013 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Harry Zheng :: Imperial College, London

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In this talk we discuss a weak necessary and sufficient SMP for Markov modulated optimal control problems. Instead of insisting on the maximum condition of the Hamiltonian, we show that 0 belongs to the sum of Clarke's generalized gradient of the Hamiltonian and Clarke's normal cone of the control constraint set at the optimal control. Under a joint concavity condition on the Hamiltonian the necessary condition becomes sufficient. We give examples to demonstrate the weak SMP and its applications in quadratic loss minimization.
Reductive group actions and some problems concerning their quotients
12:10 Fri 17 Jan, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Prof Gerald Schwarz :: Brandeis University

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We will gently introduce the concept of a complex reductive group and the notion of the quotient Z of a complex vector space V on which our complex reductive group G acts linearly. There is the quotient mapping p from V to Z. The quotient is an affine variety with a stratification coming from the group action. Let f be an automorphism of Z. We consider the following questions (and give some answers). 1) Does f preserve the stratification of Z, i.e., does it permute the strata? 2) Is there a lift F of f? This means that F maps V to V and p(F(v))=f(p(v)) for all v in V. 3) Can we arrange that F is equivariant? We show that 1) is almost always true, that 2) is true in a lot of cases and that a twisted version of 3) then holds.
Geometric quantisation in the noncompact setting
12:10 Fri 7 Mar, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Peter Hochs :: University of Adelaide

Geometric quantisation is a way to construct quantum mechanical phase spaces (Hilbert spaces) from classical mechanical phase spaces (symplectic manifolds). In the presence of a group action, the quantisation commutes with reduction principle states that geometric quantisation should be compatible with the ways the group action can be used to simplify (reduce) the classical and quantum phase spaces. This has deep consequences for the link between symplectic geometry and representation theory. The quantisation commutes with reduction principle has been given explicit meaning, and been proved, in cases where the symplectic manifold and the group acting on it are compact. There have also been results where just the group, or the orbit space of the action, is assumed to be compact. These are important and difficult, but it is somewhat frustrating that they do not even apply to the simplest example from the physics point of view: a free particle in Rn. This talk is about a joint result with Mathai Varghese where the group, manifold and orbit space may all be noncompact.
Hydrodynamics and rheology of self-propelled colloids
15:10 Fri 8 Aug, 2014 :: B17 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Sarthok Sircar :: University of Adelaide

The sub-cellular world has many components in common with soft condensed matter systems (polymers, colloids and liquid crystals). But it has novel properties, not present in traditional complex fluids, arising from a rich spectrum of non-equilibrium behavior: flocking, chemotaxis and bioconvection. The talk is divided into two parts. In the first half, we will (get an idea on how to) derive a hydrodynamic model for self-propelled particles of an arbitrary shape from first principles, in a sufficiently dilute suspension limit, moving in a 3-dimensional space inside a viscous solvent. The model is then restricted to particles with ellipsoidal geometry to quantify the interplay of the long-range excluded volume and the short-range self-propulsion effects. The expression for the constitutive stresses, relating the kinetic theory with the momentum transport equations, are derived using a combination of the virtual work principle (for extra elastic stresses) and symmetry arguments (for active stresses). The second half of the talk will highlight on my current numerical expertise. In particular we will exploit a specific class of spectral basis functions together with RK4 time-stepping to determine the dynamical phases/structures as well as phase-transitions of these ellipsoidal clusters. We will also discuss on how to define the order (or orientation) of these clusters and understand the other rheological quantities.
The FKMM invariant in low dimension
12:10 Fri 12 Sep, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Kiyonori Gomi (Shinshu University)

On a space with involutive action, the natural notion of vector bundles is equivariant vector bundles. But, there is an important variant called `Real' vector bundles in the sense of Atiyah, and, its cousin, `symplectic' or `Quaternionic' vector bundles in the sense of Dupont. The FKMM invariant is an invariant of `symplectic' vector bundles originally introduced by Furuta, Kametani, Matsue and Minami. The subject of my talk is recent development of this invariant in my joint work with Giuseppe De Nittis: The classifications of `symplectic' vector bundles in low dimension and the descriptions of some Z/2-invariants by using the FKMM invariant.
Higher rank discrete Nahm equations for SU(N) monopoles in hyperbolic space
11:10 Wed 8 Apr, 2015 :: Engineering & Maths EM213 :: Joseph Chan :: University of Melbourne

Braam and Austin in 1990, proved that SU(2) magnetic monopoles in hyperbolic space H^3 are the same as solutions of the discrete Nahm equations. I apply equivariant K-theory to the ADHM construction of instantons/holomorphic bundles to extend the Braam-Austin result from SU(2) to SU(N). During its evolution, the matrices of the higher rank discrete Nahm equations jump in dimensions and this behaviour has not been observed in discrete evolution equations before. A secondary result is that the monopole field at the boundary of H^3 determines the monopole.
Instantons and Geometric Representation Theory
12:10 Thu 23 Jul, 2015 :: Engineering and Maths EM212 :: Professor Richard Szabo :: Heriot-Watt University

We give an overview of the various approaches to studying supersymmetric quiver gauge theories on ALE spaces, and their conjectural connections to two-dimensional conformal field theory via AGT-type dualities. From a mathematical perspective, this is formulated as a relationship between the equivariant cohomology of certain moduli spaces of sheaves on stacks and the representation theory of infinite-dimensional Lie algebras. We introduce an orbifold compactification of the minimal resolution of the A-type toric singularity in four dimensions, and then construct a moduli space of framed sheaves which is conjecturally isomorphic to a Nakajima quiver variety. We apply this construction to derive relations between the equivariant cohomology of these moduli spaces and the representation theory of the affine Lie algebra of type A.
Equivariant bundle gerbes
12:10 Fri 21 Aug, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Michael Murray :: The University of Adelaide

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I will present the definitions of strong and weak group actions on a bundle gerbe and calculate the strongly equivariant class of the basic bundle gerbe on a unitary group. This is joint work with David Roberts, Danny Stevenson and Raymond Vozzo and forms part of arXiv:1506.07931.
Oka principles and the linearization problem
12:10 Fri 8 Jan, 2016 :: Engineering North N132 :: Gerald Schwarz :: Brandeis University

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Let G be a reductive complex Lie group (e.g., SL(n,C)) and let X and Y be Stein manifolds (closed complex submanifolds of some C^n). Suppose that G acts freely on X and Y. Then there are quotient Stein manifolds X/G and Y/G and quotient mappings p_X:X-> X/G and p_Y: Y-> Y/G such that X and Y are principal G-bundles over X/G and Y/G. Let us suppose that Q=X/G ~= Y/G so that X and Y have the same quotient Q. A map Phi: X\to Y of principal bundles (over Q) is simply an equivariant continuous map commuting with the projections. That is, Phi(gx)=g Phi(x) for all g in G and x in X, and p_X=p_Y o Phi. The famous Oka Principle of Grauert says that any Phi as above embeds in a continuous family Phi_t: X -> Y, t in [0,1], where Phi_0=Phi, all the Phi_t satisfy the same conditions as Phi does and Phi_1 is holomorphic. This is rather amazing. We consider the case where G does not necessarily act freely on X and Y. There is still a notion of quotient and quotient mappings p_X: X-> X//G and p_Y: Y-> Y//G where X//G and Y//G are now Stein spaces and parameterize the closed G-orbits in X and Y. We assume that Q~= X//G~= Y//G and that we have a continuous equivariant Phi such that p_X=p_Y o Phi. We find conditions under which Phi embeds into a continuous family Phi_t such that Phi_1 is holomorphic. We give an application to the Linearization Problem. Let G act holomorphically on C^n. When is there a biholomorphic map Phi:C^n -> C^n such that Phi^{-1} o g o Phi in GL(n,C) for all g in G? We find a condition which is necessary and sufficient for "most" G-actions. This is joint work with F. Kutzschebauch and F. Larusson.
A fixed point theorem on noncompact manifolds
12:10 Fri 12 Feb, 2016 :: Ingkarni Wardli B21 :: Peter Hochs :: University of Adelaide / Radboud University

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For an elliptic operator on a compact manifold acted on by a compact Lie group, the Atiyah-Segal-Singer fixed point formula expresses its equivariant index in terms of data on fixed point sets of group elements. This can for example be used to prove Weyl’s character formula. We extend the definition of the equivariant index to noncompact manifolds, and prove a generalisation of the Atiyah-Segal-Singer formula, for group elements with compact fixed point sets. In one example, this leads to a relation with characters of discrete series representations of semisimple Lie groups. (This is joint work with Hang Wang.)
The parametric h-principle for minimal surfaces in R^n and null curves in C^n
12:10 Fri 11 Mar, 2016 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Finnur Larusson :: University of Adelaide

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I will describe new joint work with Franc Forstneric (arXiv:1602.01529). This work brings together four diverse topics from differential geometry, holomorphic geometry, and topology; namely the theory of minimal surfaces, Oka theory, convex integration theory, and the theory of absolute neighborhood retracts. Our goal is to determine the rough shape of several infinite-dimensional spaces of maps of geometric interest. It turns out that they all have the same rough shape.
On the Strong Novikov Conjecture for Locally Compact Groups in Low Degree Cohomology Classes
12:10 Fri 3 Jun, 2016 :: Eng & Maths EM205 :: Yoshiyasu Fukumoto :: Kyoto University

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The main result I will discuss is non-vanishing of the image of the index map from the G-equivariant K-homology of a G-manifold X to the K-theory of the C*-algebra of the group G. The action of G on X is assumed to be proper and cocompact. Under the assumption that the Kronecker pairing of a K-homology class with a low-dimensional cohomology class is non-zero, we prove that the image of this class under the index map is non-zero. Neither discreteness of the locally compact group G nor freeness of the action of G on X are required. The case of free actions of discrete groups was considered earlier by B. Hanke and T. Schick.
Multi-scale modeling in biofluids and particle aggregation
15:10 Fri 17 Jun, 2016 :: B17 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Sarthok Sircar :: University of Adelaide

In today's seminar I will give 2 examples in mathematical biology which describes the multi-scale organization at 2 levels: the meso/micro level and the continuum/macro level. I will then detail suitable tools in statistical mechanics to link these different scales. The first problem arises in mathematical physiology: swelling-de-swelling mechanism of mucus, an ionic gel. Mucus is packaged inside cells at high concentration (volume fraction) and when released into the extracellular environment, it expands in volume by two orders of magnitude in a matter of seconds. This rapid expansion is due to the rapid exchange of calcium and sodium that changes the cross-linked structure of the mucus polymers, thereby causing it to swell. Modeling this problem involves a two-phase, polymer/solvent mixture theory (in the continuum level description), together with the chemistry of the polymer, its nearest neighbor interaction and its binding with the dissolved ionic species (in the micro-scale description). The problem is posed as a free-boundary problem, with the boundary conditions derived from a combination of variational principle and perturbation analysis. The dynamics of neutral gels and the equilibrium-states of the ionic gels are analyzed. In the second example, we numerically study the adhesion fragmentation dynamics of rigid, round particles clusters subject to a homogeneous shear flow. In the macro level we describe the dynamics of the number density of these cluster. The description in the micro-scale includes (a) binding/unbinding of the bonds attached on the particle surface, (b) bond torsion, (c) surface potential due to ionic medium, and (d) flow hydrodynamics due to shear flow.
An equivariant parametric Oka principle for bundles of homogeneous spaces
12:10 Fri 3 Mar, 2017 :: Napier 209 :: Finnur Larusson :: University of Adelaide

I will report on new joint work with Frank Kutzschebauch and Gerald Schwarz (arXiv:1612.07372). Under certain conditions, every continuous section of a holomorphic fibre bundle can be deformed to a holomorphic section. In fact, the inclusion of the space of holomorphic sections into the space of continuous sections is a weak homotopy equivalence. What if a complex Lie group acts on the bundle and its sections? We have proved an analogous result for equivariant sections. The result has a wide scope. If time permits, I will describe some interesting special cases and mention two applications.
K-types of tempered representations
12:10 Fri 7 Apr, 2017 :: Napier 209 :: Peter Hochs :: University of Adelaide

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Tempered representations of a reductive Lie group G are the irreducible unitary representations one needs in the Plancherel decomposition of L^2(G). They are relevant to harmonic analysis because of this, and also occur in the Langlands classification of the larger class of admissible representations. If K in G is a maximal compact subgroup, then there is a considerable amount of information in the restriction of a tempered representation to K. In joint work with Yanli Song and Shilin Yu, we give a geometric expression for the decomposition of such a restriction into irreducibles. The multiplicities of these irreducibles are expressed as indices of Dirac operators on reduced spaces of a coadjoint orbit of G corresponding to the representation. These reduced spaces are Spin-c analogues of reduced spaces in symplectic geometry, defined in terms of moment maps that represent conserved quantities. This result involves a Spin-c version of the quantisation commutes with reduction principle for noncompact manifolds. For discrete series representations, this was done by Paradan in 2003.
Time-reversal symmetric topology from physics
12:10 Fri 25 Aug, 2017 :: Engineering Sth S111 :: Guo Chuan Thiang :: University of Adelaide

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Time-reversal plays a crucial role in experimentally discovered topological insulators (2008) and semimetals (2015). This is mathematically interesting because one is forced to use "Quaternionic" characteristic classes and differential topology --- a previously ill-motivated generalisation. Guided by physical intuition, an equivariant Poincare-Lefschetz duality, Euler structures, and a new type of monopole with torsion charge, will be introduced.
Topology as a tool in algebra
15:10 Fri 8 Sep, 2017 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Dr Zsuzsanna Dancso :: University of Sydney

Topologists often use algebra in order to understand the shape of a space: invariants such as homology and cohomology are basic, and very successful, examples of this principle. Although topology is used as a tool in algebra less often, I will describe a recurring pattern on the border of knot theory and quantum algebra where this is possible. We will explore how the tangled topology of "flying circles in R^3" is deeply related to a famous problem in Lie theory: the Kashiwara-Vergne (KV) problem (first solved in 2006 by Alekseev-Meinrenken). I will explain how this relationship illuminates the intricate algebra of the KV problem.
Measuring the World's Biggest Bubble
13:10 Tue 19 Sep, 2017 :: Napier LG23 :: Prof Matt Roughan :: School of Mathematical Sciences

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Recently I had a bit of fun helping Graeme Denton measure his Guinness World Record (GWR) Largest (Indoor) Soap Bubble. It was a lot harder than I initially thought it would be. Soap films are interesting mathematically -- in principle they form minimal surfaces, and have constant curvature. So it should have been fairly easy. But really big bubbles aren't ideal, so measuring the GWR bubble required a mix of maths and pragmatism. It's a good example of mathematical modeling in general, so I thought it was worth a few words. I'll tell you what we did, and how we estimated how big the bubble actually was. Some links: http://www.9news.com.au/good-news/2017/08/02/13/44/adelaide-man-wins-world-record-for-largest-bubble http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-08-03/science-performer-creates-worlds-largest-indoor-soap-bubble/8770260
Equivariant formality of homogeneous spaces
12:10 Fri 29 Sep, 2017 :: Engineering Sth S111 :: Alex Chi-Kwong Fok :: University of Adelaide

Equivariant formality, a notion in equivariant topology introduced by Goresky-Kottwitz-Macpherson, is a desirable property of spaces with group actions, which allows the application of localisation formula to evaluate integrals of any top closed forms and enables one to compute easily the equivariant cohomology. Broad classes of spaces of especial interest are well-known to be equivariantly formal, e.g., compact symplectic manifolds equipped with Hamiltonian compact Lie group actions and projective varieties equipped with linear algebraic torus actions, of which flag varieties are examples. Less is known about compact homogeneous spaces G/K equipped with the isotropy action of K, which is not necessarily of maximal rank. In this talk we will review previous attempts of characterizing equivariant formality of G/K, and present our recent results on this problem using an analogue of equivariant formality in K-theory. Part of the work presented in this talk is joint with Jeffrey Carlson.
End-periodic K-homology and spin bordism
12:10 Fri 20 Oct, 2017 :: Engineering Sth S111 :: Michael Hallam :: University of Adelaide

This talk introduces new "end-periodic" variants of geometric K-homology and spin bordism theories that are tailored to a recent index theorem for even-dimensional manifolds with periodic ends. This index theorem, due to Mrowka, Ruberman and Saveliev, is a generalisation of the Atiyah-Patodi-Singer index theorem for manifolds with odd-dimensional boundary. As in the APS index theorem, there is an (end-periodic) eta invariant that appears as a correction term for the periodic end. Invariance properties of the standard relative eta invariants are elegantly expressed using K-homology and spin bordism, and this continues to hold in the end-periodic case. In fact, there are natural isomorphisms between the standard K-homology/bordism theories and their end-periodic versions, and moreover these isomorphisms preserve relative eta invariants. The study is motivated by results on positive scalar curvature, namely obstructions and distinct path components of the moduli space of PSC metrics. Our isomorphisms provide a systematic method for transferring certain results on PSC from the odd-dimensional case to the even-dimensional case. This work is joint with Mathai Varghese.
A Hecke module structure on the KK-theory of arithmetic groups
13:10 Fri 2 Mar, 2018 :: Barr Smith South Polygon Lecture theatre :: Bram Mesland :: University of Bonn

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Let $G$ be a locally compact group, $\Gamma$ a discrete subgroup and $C_{G}(\Gamma)$ the commensurator of $\Gamma$ in $G$. The cohomology of $\Gamma$ is a module over the Shimura Hecke ring of the pair $(\Gamma,C_G(\Gamma))$. This construction recovers the action of the Hecke operators on modular forms for $SL(2,\mathbb{Z})$ as a particular case. In this talk I will discuss how the Shimura Hecke ring of a pair $(\Gamma, C_{G}(\Gamma))$ maps into the $KK$-ring associated to an arbitrary $\Gamma$-C*-algebra. From this we obtain a variety of $K$-theoretic Hecke modules. In the case of manifolds the Chern character provides a Hecke equivariant transformation into cohomology, which is an isomorphism in low dimensions. We discuss Hecke equivariant exact sequences arising from possibly noncommutative compactifications of $\Gamma$-spaces. Examples include the Borel-Serre and geodesic compactifications of the universal cover of an arithmetic manifold, and the totally disconnected boundary of the Bruhat-Tits tree of $SL(2,\mathbb{Z})$. This is joint work with M.H. Sengun (Sheffield).
Index of Equivariant Callias-Type Operators
13:10 Fri 27 Apr, 2018 :: Barr Smith South Polygon Lecture theatre :: Hao Guo :: University of Adelaide

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Suppose M is a smooth Riemannian manifold on which a Lie group G acts properly and isometrically. In this talk I will explore properties of a particular class of G-invariant operators on M, called G-Callias-type operators. These are Dirac operators that have been given an additional Z_2-grading and a perturbation so as to be "invertible outside of a cocompact set in M". It turns out that G-Callias-type operators are equivariantly Fredholm and so have an index in the K-theory of the maximal group C*-algebra of G. This index can be expressed as a KK-product of a class in K-homology and a class in the K-theory of the Higson G-corona. In fact, one can show that the K-theory of the Higson G-corona is highly non-trivial, and thus the index theory of G-Callias-type operators is not obviously trivial. As an application of the index theory of G-Callias-type operators, I will mention an obstruction to the existence of G-invariant metrics of positive scalar curvature on M.
Equivariant Index, Traces and Representation Theory
11:10 Fri 10 Aug, 2018 :: Barr Smith South Polygon Lecture theatre :: Hang Wang :: University of Adelaide

K-theory of C*-algebras associated to a semisimple Lie group can be understood both from the geometric point of view via Baum-Connes assembly map and from the representation theoretic point of view via harmonic analysis of Lie groups. A K-theory generator can be viewed as the equivariant index of some Dirac operator, but also interpreted as a (family of) representation(s) parametrised by the noncompact abelian part in the Levi component of a cuspidal parabolic subgroup. Applying orbital traces to the K-theory group, we obtain the equivariant index as a fixed point formula which, for each K-theory generators for (limit of) discrete series, recovers Harish-Chandra’s character formula on the representation theory side. This is a noncompact analogue of Atiyah-Segal-Singer fixed point theorem in relation to the Weyl character formula. This is joint work with Peter Hochs.

Publications matching "An Oka principle for equivariant isomorphisms"

Publications
Equivariant and fractional index of projective elliptic operators
Varghese, Mathai; Melrose, R; Singer, I, Journal of Differential Geometry 78 (465–473) 2008
The (Gamma)over-cap-genus and a regularization of an S1-equivariant Euler class
Lu, Rongmin, Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical (Print Edition) 41 (425204-1–425204-13) 2008
Chern character in twisted K-theory: Equivariant and holomorphic cases
Varghese, Mathai; Stevenson, Daniel, Communications in Mathematical Physics 236 (161–186) 2003
Equivariant Seiberg-Witten Floer homology
Marcolli, M; Wang, Bai-Ling, Communications in Analysis and Geometry 9 (451–639) 2001

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