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Professor Nigel Bean
Chair of Applied Mathematics


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Associate Professor Joshua Ross
Senior Lecturer in Applied Mathematics


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Courses matching "Operations research"

Optimisation and Operations Research

Operations Research (OR) is the application of mathematical techniques and analysis to problem solving in business and industry, in particular to carrying out more efficiently tasks such as scheduling, or optimising the provision of services. OR is an interdisciplinary topic drawing from mathematical modelling, optimisation theory, game theory, decision analysis, statistics, and simulation to help make decisions in complex situations. This first course in OR concentrates on mathematical modelling and optimisation: for example maximising production capacity, or minimising risk. It focuses on linear optimisation problems involving both continuous, and integer variables. The course covers a variety of mathematical techniques for linear optimisation, and the theory behind them. It will also explore the role of heuristics in such problems. Examples will be presented from important application areas, such as the emergency services, telecommunications, transportation, and manufacturing. Students will undertake a team project based on an actual Adelaide problem. Topics covered are: formulating a linear program; the Simplex Method; duality and Complementary slackness; sensitivity analysis; an interior point method; alternative means to solve some linear and integer programs, such as primal-dual approaches methods from a complete solution (such as Greedy Methods, and Simulated Annealing), methods from a partial solution (such as Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm, and branch-and-bound).

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Events matching "Operations research"

Watching evolution in real time; problems and potential research areas.
15:10 Fri 26 May, 2006 :: G08. Mathematics Building University of Adelaide :: Prof Alan Cooper (Federation Fellow)

Recent studies (1) have indicated problems with our ability to use the genetic distances between species to estimate the time since their divergence (so called molecular clocks). An exponential decay curve has been detected in comparisons of closely related taxa in mammal and bird groups, and rough approximations suggest that molecular clock calculations may be problematic for the recent past (eg <1 million years). Unfortunately, this period encompasses a number of key evolutionary events where estimates of timing are critical such as modern human evolutionary history, the domestication of animals and plants, and most issues involved in conservation biology. A solution (formulated at UA) will be briefly outlined. A second area of active interest is the recent suggestion (2) that mitochondrial DNA diversity does not track population size in several groups, in contrast to standard thinking. This finding has been interpreted as showing that mtDNA may not be evolving neutrally, as has long been assumed.
Large ancient DNA datasets provide a means to examine these issues, by revealing evolutionary processes in real time (3). The data also provide a rich area for mathematical investigation as temporal information provides information about several parameters that are unknown in serial coalescent calculations (4).
References:
  1. Ho SYW et al. Time dependency of molecular rate estimates and systematic overestimation of recent divergence times. Mol. Biol. Evol. 22, 1561-1568 (2005);
    Penny D, Nature 436, 183-184 (2005).
  2. Bazin E., et al. Population size does not influence mitochondrial genetic diversity in animals. Science 312, 570 (2006);
    Eyre-Walker A. Size does not matter for mitochondrial DNA, Science 312, 537 (2006).
  3. Shapiro B, et al. Rise and fall of the Beringian steppe bison. Science 306: 1561-1565 (2004);
    Chan et al. Bayesian estimation of the timing and severity of a population bottleneck from ancient DNA. PLoS Genetics, 2 e59 (2006).
  4. Drummond et al. Measurably evolving populations, Trends in Ecol. Evol. 18, 481-488 (2003);
    Drummond et al. Bayesian coalescent inference of past population dynamics from molecular sequences. Molecular Biology Evolution 22, 1185-92 (2005).
Global and Local stationary modelling in finance: Theory and empirical evidence
14:10 Thu 10 Apr, 2008 :: G04 Napier Building University of Adelaide :: Prof. Dominique Guégan :: Universite Paris 1 Pantheon-Sorbonne

To model real data sets using second order stochastic processes imposes that the data sets verify the second order stationarity condition. This stationarity condition concerns the unconditional moments of the process. It is in that context that most of models developed from the sixties' have been studied; We refer to the ARMA processes (Brockwell and Davis, 1988), the ARCH, GARCH and EGARCH models (Engle, 1982, Bollerslev, 1986, Nelson, 1990), the SETAR process (Lim and Tong, 1980 and Tong, 1990), the bilinear model (Granger and Andersen, 1978, Guégan, 1994), the EXPAR model (Haggan and Ozaki, 1980), the long memory process (Granger and Joyeux, 1980, Hosking, 1981, Gray, Zang and Woodward, 1989, Beran, 1994, Giraitis and Leipus, 1995, Guégan, 2000), the switching process (Hamilton, 1988). For all these models, we get an invertible causal solution under specific conditions on the parameters, then the forecast points and the forecast intervals are available.

Thus, the stationarity assumption is the basis for a general asymptotic theory for identification, estimation and forecasting. It guarantees that the increase of the sample size leads to more and more information of the same kind which is basic for an asymptotic theory to make sense.

Now non-stationarity modelling has also a long tradition in econometrics. This one is based on the conditional moments of the data generating process. It appears mainly in the heteroscedastic and volatility models, like the GARCH and related models, and stochastic volatility processes (Ghysels, Harvey and Renault 1997). This non-stationarity appears also in a different way with structural changes models like the switching models (Hamilton, 1988), the stopbreak model (Diebold and Inoue, 2001, Breidt and Hsu, 2002, Granger and Hyung, 2004) and the SETAR models, for instance. It can also be observed from linear models with time varying coefficients (Nicholls and Quinn, 1982, Tsay, 1987).

Thus, using stationary unconditional moments suggest a global stationarity for the model, but using non-stationary unconditional moments or non-stationary conditional moments or assuming existence of states suggest that this global stationarity fails and that we only observe a local stationary behavior.

The growing evidence of instability in the stochastic behavior of stocks, of exchange rates, of some economic data sets like growth rates for instance, characterized by existence of volatility or existence of jumps in the variance or on the levels of the prices imposes to discuss the assumption of global stationarity and its consequence in modelling, particularly in forecasting. Thus we can address several questions with respect to these remarks.

1. What kinds of non-stationarity affect the major financial and economic data sets? How to detect them?

2. Local and global stationarities: How are they defined?

3. What is the impact of evidence of non-stationarity on the statistics computed from the global non stationary data sets?

4. How can we analyze data sets in the non-stationary global framework? Does the asymptotic theory work in non-stationary framework?

5. What kind of models create local stationarity instead of global stationarity? How can we use them to develop a modelling and a forecasting strategy?

These questions began to be discussed in some papers in the economic literature. For some of these questions, the answers are known, for others, very few works exist. In this talk I will discuss all these problems and will propose 2 new stategies and modelling to solve them. Several interesting topics in empirical finance awaiting future research will also be discussed.

Probabilistic models of human cognition
15:10 Fri 29 Aug, 2008 :: G03 Napier Building University of Adelaide :: Dr Daniel Navarro :: School of Psychology, University of Adelaide

Over the last 15 years a fairly substantial psychological literature has developed in which human reasoning and decision-making is viewed as the solution to a variety of statistical problems posed by the environments in which we operate. In this talk, I briefly outline the general approach to cognitive modelling that is adopted in this literature, which relies heavily on Bayesian statistics, and introduce a little of the current research in this field. In particular, I will discuss work by myself and others on the statistical basis of how people make simple inductive leaps and generalisations, and the links between these generalisations and how people acquire word meanings and learn new concepts. If time permits, the extensions of the work in which complex concepts may be characterised with the aid of nonparametric Bayesian tools such as Dirichlet processes will be briefly mentioned.
Assisted reproduction technology: how maths can contribute
13:10 Wed 22 Oct, 2008 :: Napier 210 :: Dr Yvonne Stokes

Media...
Most people will have heard of IVF (in vitro fertilisation), a technology for helping infertile couples have a baby. Although there are many IVF babies, many will also know that the success rate is still low for the cost and inconvenience involved. The fact that some women cannot make use of IVF because of life-threatening consequences is less well known but motivates research into other technologies, including IVM (in vitro maturation). What has all this to do with maths? Come along and find out how mathematical modelling is contributing to understanding and improvement in this important and interesting field.
Oceanographic Research at the South Australian Research and Development Institute: opportunities for collaborative research
15:10 Fri 21 Nov, 2008 :: Napier G04 :: Associate Prof John Middleton :: South Australian Research and Development Institute

Increasing threats to S.A.'s fisheries and marine environment have underlined the increasing need for soundly based research into the ocean circulation and ecosystems (phyto/zooplankton) of the shelf and gulfs. With support of Marine Innovation SA, the Oceanography Program has within 2 years, grown to include 6 FTEs and a budget of over $4.8M. The program currently leads two major research projects, both of which involve numerical and applied mathematical modelling of oceanic flow and ecosystems as well as statistical techniques for the analysis of data. The first is the implementation of the Southern Australian Integrated Marine Observing System (SAIMOS) that is providing data to understand the dynamics of shelf boundary currents, monitor for climate change and understand the phyto/zooplankton ecosystems that under-pin SA's wild fisheries and aquaculture. SAIMOS involves the use of ship-based sampling, the deployment of underwater marine moorings, underwater gliders, HF Ocean RADAR, acoustic tracking of tagged fish and Autonomous Underwater vehicles.

The second major project involves measuring and modelling the ocean circulation and biological systems within Spencer Gulf and the impact on prawn larval dispersal and on the sustainability of existing and proposed aquaculture sites. The discussion will focus on opportunities for collaborative research with both faculty and students in this exciting growth area of S.A. science.

From linear algebra to knot theory
15:10 Fri 21 Aug, 2009 :: Badger Labs G13 Macbeth Lecture Theatre :: Prof Ross Street :: Macquarie University, Sydney

Vector spaces and linear functions form our paradigmatic monoidal category. The concepts underpinning linear algebra admit definitions, operations and constructions with analogues in many other parts of mathematics. We shall see how to generalize much of linear algebra to the context of monoidal categories. Traditional examples of such categories are obtained by replacing vector spaces by linear representations of a given compact group or by sheaves of vector spaces. More recent examples come from low-dimensional topology, in particular, from knot theory where the linear functions are replaced by braids or tangles. These geometric monoidal categories are often free in an appropriate sense, a fact that can be used to obtain algebraic invariants for manifolds.
Statistical analysis for harmonized development of systemic organs in human fetuses
11:00 Thu 17 Sep, 2009 :: School Board Room :: Prof Kanta Naito :: Shimane University

The growth processes of human babies have been studied sufficiently in scientific fields, but there have still been many issues about the developments of human fetus which are not clarified. The aim of this research is to investigate the developing process of systemic organs of human fetuses based on the data set of measurements of fetus's bodies and organs. Specifically, this talk is concerned with giving a mathematical understanding for the harmonized developments of the organs of human fetuses. The method to evaluate such harmonies is proposed by the use of the maximal dilatation appeared in the theory of quasi-conformal mapping.
Understanding hypersurfaces through tropical geometry
12:10 Fri 25 Sep, 2009 :: Napier 102 :: Dr Mohammed Abouzaid :: Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Given a polynomial in two or more variables, one may study the zero locus from the point of view of different mathematical subjects (number theory, algebraic geometry, ...). I will explain how tropical geometry allows to encode all topological aspects by elementary combinatorial objects called "tropical varieties." Mohammed Abouzaid received a B.S. in 2002 from the University of Richmond, and a Ph.D. in 2007 from the University of Chicago under the supervision of Paul Seidel. He is interested in symplectic topology and its interactions with algebraic geometry and differential topology, in particular the homological mirror symmetry conjecture. Since 2007 he has been a postdoctoral fellow at MIT, and a Clay Mathematics Institute Research Fellow.
Stable commutator length
13:40 Fri 25 Sep, 2009 :: Napier 102 :: Prof Danny Calegari :: California Institute of Technology

Stable commutator length answers the question: "what is the simplest surface in a given space with prescribed boundary?" where "simplest" is interpreted in topological terms. This topological definition is complemented by several equivalent definitions - in group theory, as a measure of non-commutativity of a group; and in linear programming, as the solution of a certain linear optimization problem. On the topological side, scl is concerned with questions such as computing the genus of a knot, or finding the simplest 4-manifold that bounds a given 3-manifold. On the linear programming side, scl is measured in terms of certain functions called quasimorphisms, which arise from hyperbolic geometry (negative curvature) and symplectic geometry (causal structures). In these talks we will discuss how scl in free and surface groups is connected to such diverse phenomena as the existence of closed surface subgroups in graphs of groups, rigidity and discreteness of symplectic representations, bounding immersed curves on a surface by immersed subsurfaces, and the theory of multi- dimensional continued fractions and Klein polyhedra. Danny Calegari is the Richard Merkin Professor of Mathematics at the California Institute of Technology, and is one of the recipients of the 2009 Clay Research Award for his work in geometric topology and geometric group theory. He received a B.A. in 1994 from the University of Melbourne, and a Ph.D. in 2000 from the University of California, Berkeley under the joint supervision of Andrew Casson and William Thurston. From 2000 to 2002 he was Benjamin Peirce Assistant Professor at Harvard University, after which he joined the Caltech faculty; he became Richard Merkin Professor in 2007.
The proof of the Poincare conjecture
15:10 Fri 25 Sep, 2009 :: Napier 102 :: Prof Terrence Tao :: UCLA

In a series of three papers from 2002-2003, Grigori Perelman gave a spectacular proof of the Poincare Conjecture (every smooth compact simply connected three-dimensional manifold is topologically isomorphic to a sphere), one of the most famous open problems in mathematics (and one of the seven Clay Millennium Prize Problems worth a million dollars each), by developing several new groundbreaking advances in Hamilton's theory of Ricci flow on manifolds. In this talk I describe in broad detail how the proof proceeds, and briefly discuss some of the key turning points in the argument. About the speaker: Terence Tao was born in Adelaide, Australia, in 1975. He has been a professor of mathematics at UCLA since 1999, having completed his PhD under Elias Stein at Princeton in 1996. Tao's areas of research include harmonic analysis, PDE, combinatorics, and number theory. He has received a number of awards, including the Salem Prize in 2000, the Bochner Prize in 2002, the Fields Medal and SASTRA Ramanujan Prize in 2006, and the MacArthur Fellowship and Ostrowski Prize in 2007. Terence Tao also currently holds the James and Carol Collins chair in mathematics at UCLA, and is a Fellow of the Royal Society and the Australian Academy of Sciences (Corresponding Member).
Contemporary frontiers in statistics
15:10 Mon 28 Sep, 2009 :: Badger Labs G31 Macbeth Lectrue :: Prof. Peter Hall :: University of Melbourne

The availability of powerful computing equipment has had a dramatic impact on statistical methods and thinking, changing forever the way data are analysed. New data types, larger quantities of data, and new classes of research problem are all motivating new statistical methods. We shall give examples of each of these issues, and discuss the current and future directions of frontier problems in statistics.
American option pricing in a Markov chain market model
15:10 Fri 19 Mar, 2010 :: School Board Room :: Prof Robert Elliott :: School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Adelaide

This paper considers a model for asset pricing in a world where the randomness is modeled by a Markov chain rather than Brownian motion. In this paper we develop a theory of optimal stopping and related variational inequalities for American options in this model. A version of Saigal's Lemma is established and numerical algorithms developed. This is a joint work with John van der Hoek.
Exploratory experimentation and computation
15:10 Fri 16 Apr, 2010 :: Napier LG29 :: Prof Jonathan Borwein :: University of Newcastle

Media...
The mathematical research community is facing a great challenge to re-evaluate the role of proof in light of the growing power of current computer systems, of modern mathematical computing packages, and of the growing capacity to data-mine on the Internet. Add to that the enormous complexity of many modern capstone results such as the Poincare conjecture, Fermat's last theorem, and the Classification of finite simple groups. As the need and prospects for inductive mathematics blossom, the requirement to ensure the role of proof is properly founded remains undiminished. I shall look at the philosophical context with examples and then offer some of five bench-marking examples of the opportunities and challenges we face.
Estimation of sparse Bayesian networks using a score-based approach
15:10 Fri 30 Apr, 2010 :: School Board Room :: Dr Jessica Kasza :: University of Copenhagen

The estimation of Bayesian networks given high-dimensional data sets, with more variables than there are observations, has been the focus of much recent research. These structures provide a flexible framework for the representation of the conditional independence relationships of a set of variables, and can be particularly useful in the estimation of genetic regulatory networks given gene expression data.

In this talk, I will discuss some new research on learning sparse networks, that is, networks with many conditional independence restrictions, using a score-based approach. In the case of genetic regulatory networks, such sparsity reflects the view that each gene is regulated by relatively few other genes. The presented approach allows prior information about the overall sparsity of the underlying structure to be included in the analysis, as well as the incorporation of prior knowledge about the connectivity of individual nodes within the network.

Interpolation of complex data using spatio-temporal compressive sensing
13:00 Fri 28 May, 2010 :: Santos Lecture Theatre :: A/Prof Matthew Roughan :: School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Adelaide

Many complex datasets suffer from missing data, and interpolating these missing elements is a key task in data analysis. Moreover, it is often the case that we see only a linear combination of the desired measurements, not the measurements themselves. For instance, in network management, it is easy to count the traffic on a link, but harder to measure the end-to-end flows. Additionally, typical interpolation algorithms treat either the spatial, or the temporal components of data separately, but in many real datasets have strong spatio-temporal structure that we would like to exploit in reconstructing the missing data. In this talk I will describe a novel reconstruction algorithm that exploits concepts from the growing area of compressive sensing to solve all of these problems and more. The approach works so well on Internet traffic matrices that we can obtain a reasonable reconstruction with as much as 98% of the original data missing.
Some thoughts on wine production
15:05 Fri 18 Jun, 2010 :: School Board Room :: Prof Zbigniew Michalewicz :: School of Computer Science, University of Adelaide

In the modern information era, managers (e.g. winemakers) recognize the competitive opportunities represented by decision-support tools which can provide a significant cost savings & revenue increases for their businesses. Wineries make daily decisions on the processing of grapes, from harvest time (prediction of maturity of grapes, scheduling of equipment and labour, capacity planning, scheduling of crushers) through tank farm activities (planning and scheduling of wine and juice transfers on the tank farm) to packaging processes (bottling and storage activities). As such operation is quite complex, the whole area is loaded with interesting OR-related issues. These include the issues of global vs. local optimization, relationship between prediction and optimization, operating in dynamic environments, strategic vs. tactical optimization, and multi-objective optimization & trade-off analysis. During the talk we address the above issues; a few real-world applications will be shown and discussed to emphasize some of the presented material.
Topological chaos in two and three dimensions
15:10 Fri 18 Jun, 2010 :: Santos Lecture Theatre :: Dr Matt Finn :: School of Mathematical Sciences

Research into two-dimensional laminar fluid mixing has enjoyed a renaissance in the last decade since the realisation that the Thurston–Nielsen theory of surface homeomorphisms can assist in designing efficient "topologically chaotic" batch mixers. In this talk I will survey some tools used in topological fluid kinematics, including braid groups, train-tracks, dynamical systems and topological index formulae. I will then make some speculations about topological chaos in three dimensions.
Meteorological drivers of extreme bushfire events in southern Australia
15:10 Fri 2 Jul, 2010 :: Benham Lecture Theatre :: Prof Graham Mills :: Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research, Melbourne

Bushfires occur regularly during summer in southern Australia, but only a few of these fires become iconic due to their effects, either in terms of loss of life or economic and social cost. Such events include Black Friday (1939), the Hobart fires (1967), Ash Wednesday (1983), the Canberra bushfires (2003), and most recently Black Saturday in February 2009. In most of these events the weather of the day was statistically extreme in terms of heat, (low) humidity, and wind speed, and in terms of antecedent drought. There are a number of reasons for conducting post-event analyses of the meteorology of these events. One is to identify any meteorological circulation systems or dynamic processes occurring on those days that might not be widely or hitherto recognised, to document these, and to develop new forecast or guidance products. The understanding and prediction of such features can be used in the short term to assist in effective management of fires and the safety of firefighters and in the medium range to assist preparedness for the onset of extreme conditions. The results of such studies can also be applied to simulations of future climates to assess the likely changes in frequency of the most extreme fire weather events, and their documentary records provide a resource that can be used for advanced training purposes. In addition, particularly for events further in the past, revisiting these events using reanalysis data sets and contemporary NWP models can also provide insights unavailable at the time of the events. Over the past few years the Bushfire CRC's Fire Weather and Fire Danger project in CAWCR has studied the mesoscale meteorology of a number of major fire events, including the days of Ash Wednesday 1983, the Dandenong Ranges fire in January 1997, the Canberra fires and the Alpine breakout fires in January 2003, the Lower Eyre Peninsula fires in January 2005 and the Boorabbin fire in December 2007-January 2008. Various aspects of these studies are described below, including the structures of dry cold frontal wind changes, the particular character of the cold fronts associated with the most damaging fires in southeastern Australia, and some aspects of how the vertical temperature and humidity structure of the atmosphere may affect the fire weather at the surface. These studies reveal much about these major events, but also suggest future research directions, and some of these will be discussed.
Mathematica Seminar
15:10 Wed 28 Jul, 2010 :: Engineering Annex 314 :: Kim Schriefer :: Wolfram Research

The Mathematica Seminars 2010 offer an opportunity to experience the applicability, ease-of-use, as well as the advancements of Mathematica 7 in education and academic research. These seminars will highlight the latest directions in technical computing with Mathematica, and the impact this technology has across a wide range of academic fields, from maths, physics and biology to finance, economics and business. Those not yet familiar with Mathematica will gain an overview of the system and discover the breadth of applications it can address, while experts will get firsthand experience with recent advances in Mathematica like parallel computing, digital image processing, point-and-click palettes, built-in curated data, as well as courseware examples.
A spatial-temporal point process model for fine resolution multisite rainfall data from Roma, Italy
14:10 Thu 19 Aug, 2010 :: Napier G04 :: A/Prof Paul Cowpertwait :: Auckland University of Technology

A point process rainfall model is further developed that has storm origins occurring in space-time according to a Poisson process. Each storm origin has a random radius so that storms occur as circular regions in two-dimensional space, where the storm radii are taken to be independent exponential random variables. Storm origins are of random type z, where z follows a continuous probability distribution. Cell origins occur in a further spatial Poisson process and have arrival times that follow a Neyman-Scott point process. Cell origins have random radii so that cells form discs in two-dimensional space. Statistical properties up to third order are derived and used to fit the model to 10 min series taken from 23 sites across the Roma region, Italy. Distributional properties of the observed annual maxima are compared to equivalent values sampled from series that are simulated using the fitted model. The results indicate that the model will be of use in urban drainage projects for the Roma region.
Compound and constrained regression analyses for EIV models
15:05 Fri 27 Aug, 2010 :: Napier LG28 :: Prof Wei Zhu :: State University of New York at Stony Brook

In linear regression analysis, randomness often exists in the independent variables and the resulting models are referred to errors-in-variables (EIV) models. The existing general EIV modeling framework, the structural model approach, is parametric and dependent on the usually unknown underlying distributions. In this work, we introduce a general non-parametric EIV modeling framework, the compound regression analysis, featuring an intuitive geometric representation and a 1-1 correspondence to the structural model. Properties, examples and further generalizations of this new modeling approach are discussed in this talk.
Simultaneous confidence band and hypothesis test in generalised varying-coefficient models
15:05 Fri 10 Sep, 2010 :: Napier LG28 :: Prof Wenyang Zhang :: University of Bath

Generalised varying-coefficient models (GVC) are very important models. There are a considerable number of literature addressing these models. However, most of the existing literature are devoted to the estimation procedure. In this talk, I will systematically investigate the statistical inference for GVC, which includes confidence band as well as hypothesis test. I will show the asymptotic distribution of the maximum discrepancy between the estimated functional coefficient and the true functional coefficient. I will compare different approaches for the construction of confidence band and hypothesis test. Finally, the proposed statistical inference methods are used to analyse the data from China about contraceptive use there, which leads to some interesting findings.
Principal Component Analysis Revisited
15:10 Fri 15 Oct, 2010 :: Napier G04 :: Assoc. Prof Inge Koch :: University of Adelaide

Since the beginning of the 20th century, Principal Component Analysis (PCA) has been an important tool in the analysis of multivariate data. The principal components summarise data in fewer than the original number of variables without losing essential information, and thus allow a split of the data into signal and noise components. PCA is a linear method, based on elegant mathematical theory. The increasing complexity of data together with the emergence of fast computers in the later parts of the 20th century has led to a renaissance of PCA. The growing numbers of variables (in particular, high-dimensional low sample size problems), non-Gaussian data, and functional data (where the data are curves) are posing exciting challenges to statisticians, and have resulted in new research which extends the classical theory. I begin with the classical PCA methodology and illustrate the challenges presented by the complex data that we are now able to collect. The main part of the talk focuses on extensions of PCA: the duality of PCA and the Principal Coordinates of Multidimensional Scaling, Sparse PCA, and consistency results relating to principal components, as the dimension grows. We will also look at newer developments such as Principal Component Regression and Supervised PCA, nonlinear PCA and Functional PCA.
TBA
15:05 Fri 22 Oct, 2010 :: Napier LG28 :: Dr Andy Lian :: University of Adelaide

Arbitrage bounds for weighted variance swap prices
15:05 Fri 3 Dec, 2010 :: Napier LG28 :: Prof Mark Davis :: Imperial College London

This paper builds on earlier work by Davis and Hobson (Mathematical Finance, 2007) giving model-free---except for a 'frictionless markets' assumption--- necessary and sufficient conditions for absence of arbitrage given a set of current-time put and call options on some underlying asset. Here we suppose that the prices of a set of put options, all maturing at the same time, are given and satisfy the conditions for consistency with absence of arbitrage. We now add a path-dependent option, specifically a weighted variance swap, to the set of traded assets and ask what are the conditions on its time-0 price under which consistency with absence of arbitrage is maintained. In the present work, we work under the extra modelling assumption that the underlying asset price process has continuous paths. In general, we find that there is always a non- trivial lower bound to the range of arbitrage-free prices, but only in the case of a corridor swap do we obtain a finite upper bound. In the case of, say, the vanilla variance swap, a finite upper bound exists when there are additional traded European options which constrain the left wing of the volatility surface in appropriate ways.
Queues with skill based routing under FCFS–ALIS regime
15:10 Fri 11 Feb, 2011 :: B17 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Gideon Weiss :: The University of Haifa, Israel

We consider a system where jobs of several types are served by servers of several types, and a bipartite graph between server types and job types describes feasible assignments. This is a common situation in manufacturing, call centers with skill based routing, matching of parent-child in adoption or matching in kidney transplants etc. We consider the case of first come first served policy: jobs are assigned to the first available feasible server in order of their arrivals. We consider two types of policies for assigning customers to idle servers - a random assignment and assignment to the longest idle server (ALIS) We survey some results for four different situations:

  • For a loss system we find conditions for reversibility and insensitivity.
  • For a manufacturing type system, in which there is enough capacity to serve all jobs, we discuss a product form solution and waiting times.
  • For an infinite matching model in which an infinite sequence of customers of IID types, and infinite sequence of servers of IID types are matched according to first come first, we obtain a product form stationary distribution for this system, which we use to calculate matching rates.
  • For a call center model with overload and abandonments we make some plausible observations.

This talk surveys joint work with Ivo Adan, Rene Caldentey, Cor Hurkens, Ed Kaplan and Damon Wischik, as well as work by Jeremy Visschers, Rishy Talreja and Ward Whitt.

Bioinspired computation in combinatorial optimization: algorithms and their computational complexity
15:10 Fri 11 Mar, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Frank Neumann :: The University of Adelaide

Media...
Bioinspired computation methods, such as evolutionary algorithms and ant colony optimization, are being applied successfully to complex engineering and combinatorial optimization problems. The computational complexity analysis of this type of algorithms has significantly increased the theoretical understanding of these successful algorithms. In this talk, I will give an introduction into this field of research and present some important results that we achieved for problems from combinatorial optimization. These results can also be found in my recent textbook "Bioinspired Computation in Combinatorial Optimization -- Algorithms and Their Computational Complexity".
Nanotechnology: The mathematics of gas storage in metal-organic frameworks.
12:10 Mon 28 Mar, 2011 :: 5.57 Ingkarni Wardli :: Wei Xian Lim :: University of Adelaide

Have you thought about what sort of car you would be driving in the future? Would it be a hybrid, solar, hydrogen or electric car? I would like to be driving a hydrogen car because my field of research may aid in their development! In my presentation I will introduce you to the world of metal-organic frameworks, which are an exciting new class of materials that have great potential in applications such as hydrogen gas storage. I will also discuss about the mathematical model that I am using to model the performance of metal-organic frameworks based on beryllium.
Classification for high-dimensional data
15:10 Fri 1 Apr, 2011 :: Conference Room Level 7 Ingkarni Wardli :: Associate Prof Inge Koch :: The University of Adelaide

For two-class classification problems Fisher's discriminant rule performs well in many scenarios provided the dimension, d, is much smaller than the sample size n. As the dimension increases, Fisher's rule may no longer be adequate, and can perform as poorly as random guessing. In this talk we look at new ways of overcoming this poor performance for high-dimensional data by suitably modifying Fisher's rule, and in particular we describe the 'Features Annealed Independence Rule (FAIR)? of Fan and Fan (2008) and a rule based on canonical correlation analysis. I describe some theoretical developments, and also show analysis of data which illustrate the performance of these modified rule.
Why is a pure mathematician working in biology?
15:10 Fri 15 Apr, 2011 :: Mawson Lab G19 lecture theatre :: Associate Prof Andrew Francis :: University of Western Sydney

Media...
A pure mathematician working in biology should be a contradiction in terms. In this talk I will describe how I became interested in working in biology, coming from an algebraic background. I will also describe some areas of evolutionary biology that may benefit from an algebraic approach. Finally, if time permits I will reflect on the sometimes difficult distinction between pure and applied mathematics, and perhaps venture some thoughts on mathematical research in general.
On parameter estimation in population models
15:10 Fri 6 May, 2011 :: 715 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Joshua Ross :: The University of Adelaide

Essential to applying a mathematical model to a real-world application is calibrating the model to data. Methods for calibrating population models often become computationally infeasible when the populations size (more generally the size of the state space) becomes large, or other complexities such as time-dependent transition rates, or sampling error, are present. Here we will discuss the use of diffusion approximations to perform estimation in several scenarios, with successively reduced assumptions: (i) under the assumption of stationarity (the process had been evolving for a very long time with constant parameter values); (ii) transient dynamics (the assumption of stationarity is invalid, and thus only constant parameter values may be assumed); and, (iii) time-inhomogeneous chains (the parameters may vary with time) and accounting for observation error (a sample of the true state is observed).
When statistics meets bioinformatics
12:10 Wed 11 May, 2011 :: Napier 210 :: Prof Patty Solomon :: School of Mathematical Sciences

Media...
Bioinformatics is a new field of research which encompasses mathematics, computer science, biology, medicine and the physical sciences. It has arisen from the need to handle and analyse the vast amounts of data being generated by the new genomics technologies. The interface of these disciplines used to be information-poor, but is now information-mega-rich, and statistics plays a central role in processing this information and making it intelligible. In this talk, I will describe a published bioinformatics study which claimed to have developed a simple test for the early detection of ovarian cancer from a blood sample. The US Food and Drug Administration was on the verge of approving the test kits for market in 2004 when demonstrated flaws in the study design and analysis led to its withdrawal. We are still waiting for an effective early biomarker test for ovarian cancer.
Statistical challenges in molecular phylogenetics
15:10 Fri 20 May, 2011 :: Mawson Lab G19 lecture theatre :: Dr Barbara Holland :: University of Tasmania

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This talk will give an introduction to the ways that mathematics and statistics gets used in the inference of evolutionary (phylogenetic) trees. Taking a model-based approach to estimating the relationships between species has proven to be an enormously effective, however, there are some tricky statistical challenges that remain. The increasingly plentiful amount of DNA sequence data is a boon, but it is also throwing a spotlight on some of the shortcomings of current best practice particularly in how we (1) assess the reliability of our phylogenetic estimates, and (2) how we choose appropriate models. This talk will aim to give a general introduction this area of research and will also highlight some results from two of my recent PhD students.
Optimal experimental design for stochastic population models
15:00 Wed 1 Jun, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Dan Pagendam :: CSIRO, Brisbane

Markov population processes are popular models for studying a wide range of phenomena including the spread of disease, the evolution of chemical reactions and the movements of organisms in population networks (metapopulations). Our ability to use these models effectively can be limited by our knowledge about parameters, such as disease transmission and recovery rates in an epidemic. Recently, there has been interest in devising optimal experimental designs for stochastic models, so that practitioners can collect data in a manner that maximises the precision of maximum likelihood estimates of the parameters for these models. I will discuss some recent work on optimal design for a variety of population models, beginning with some simple one-parameter models where the optimal design can be obtained analytically and moving on to more complicated multi-parameter models in epidemiology that involve latent states and non-exponentially distributed infectious periods. For these more complex models, the optimal design must be arrived at using computational methods and we rely on a Gaussian diffusion approximation to obtain analytical expressions for Fisher's information matrix, which is at the heart of most optimality criteria in experimental design. I will outline a simple cross-entropy algorithm that can be used for obtaining optimal designs for these models. We will also explore the improvements in experimental efficiency when using the optimal design over some simpler designs, such as the design where observations are spaced equidistantly in time.
Priority queueing systems with random switchover times and generalisations of the Kendall-Takacs equation
16:00 Wed 1 Jun, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Andrei Bejan :: The University of Cambridge

In this talk I will review existing analytical results for priority queueing systems with Poisson incoming flows, general service times and a single server which needs some (random) time to switch between requests of different priority. Specifically, I will discuss analytical results for the busy period and workload of such systems with a special structure of switchover times. The results related to the busy period can be seen as generalisations of the famous Kendall-Tak\'{a}cs functional equation for $M|G|1$: being formulated in terms of Laplace-Stieltjes transform, they represent systems of functional recurrent equations. I will present a methodology and algorithms of their numerical solution; the efficiency of these algorithms is achieved by acceleration of the numerical procedure of solving the classical Kendall-Tak\'{a}cs equation. At the end I will identify open problems with regard to such systems; these open problems are mainly related to the modelling of switchover times.
Natural operations on the Hochschild cochain complex
13:10 Fri 3 Jun, 2011 :: Mawson 208 :: Dr Michael Batanin :: Macquarie University

The Hochschild cochain complex of an associative algebra provides an important bridge between algebra and geometry. Algebraically, this is the derived center of the algebra. Geometrically, the Hochschild cohomology of the algebra of smooth functions on a manifold is isomorphic to the graduate space of polyvector fields on this manifold. There are many important operations acting on the Hochschild complex. It is, however, a tricky question to ask which operations are natural because the Hochschild complex is not a functor. In my talk I will explain how we can overcome this obstacle and compute all possible natural operations on the Hochschild complex. The result leads immediately to a proof of the Deligne conjecture on Hochschild cochains.
Inference and optimal design for percolation and general random graph models (Part I)
09:30 Wed 8 Jun, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Andrei Bejan :: The University of Cambridge

The problem of optimal arrangement of nodes of a random weighted graph is discussed in this workshop. The nodes of graphs under study are fixed, but their edges are random and established according to the so called edge-probability function. This function is assumed to depend on the weights attributed to the pairs of graph nodes (or distances between them) and a statistical parameter. It is the purpose of experimentation to make inference on the statistical parameter and thus to extract as much information about it as possible. We also distinguish between two different experimentation scenarios: progressive and instructive designs.

We adopt a utility-based Bayesian framework to tackle the optimal design problem for random graphs of this kind. Simulation based optimisation methods, mainly Monte Carlo and Markov Chain Monte Carlo, are used to obtain the solution. We study optimal design problem for the inference based on partial observations of random graphs by employing data augmentation technique. We prove that the infinitely growing or diminishing node configurations asymptotically represent the worst node arrangements. We also obtain the exact solution to the optimal design problem for proximity (geometric) graphs and numerical solution for graphs with threshold edge-probability functions.

We consider inference and optimal design problems for finite clusters from bond percolation on the integer lattice $\mathbb{Z}^d$ and derive a range of both numerical and analytical results for these graphs. We introduce inner-outer plots by deleting some of the lattice nodes and show that the ëmostly populatedí designs are not necessarily optimal in the case of incomplete observations under both progressive and instructive design scenarios. Some of the obtained results may generalise to other lattices.

Inference and optimal design for percolation and general random graph models (Part II)
10:50 Wed 8 Jun, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Andrei Bejan :: The University of Cambridge

The problem of optimal arrangement of nodes of a random weighted graph is discussed in this workshop. The nodes of graphs under study are fixed, but their edges are random and established according to the so called edge-probability function. This function is assumed to depend on the weights attributed to the pairs of graph nodes (or distances between them) and a statistical parameter. It is the purpose of experimentation to make inference on the statistical parameter and thus to extract as much information about it as possible. We also distinguish between two different experimentation scenarios: progressive and instructive designs.

We adopt a utility-based Bayesian framework to tackle the optimal design problem for random graphs of this kind. Simulation based optimisation methods, mainly Monte Carlo and Markov Chain Monte Carlo, are used to obtain the solution. We study optimal design problem for the inference based on partial observations of random graphs by employing data augmentation technique. We prove that the infinitely growing or diminishing node configurations asymptotically represent the worst node arrangements. We also obtain the exact solution to the optimal design problem for proximity (geometric) graphs and numerical solution for graphs with threshold edge-probability functions.

We consider inference and optimal design problems for finite clusters from bond percolation on the integer lattice $\mathbb{Z}^d$ and derive a range of both numerical and analytical results for these graphs. We introduce inner-outer plots by deleting some of the lattice nodes and show that the ëmostly populatedí designs are not necessarily optimal in the case of incomplete observations under both progressive and instructive design scenarios. Some of the obtained results may generalise to other lattices.

Quantitative proteomics: data analysis and statistical challenges
10:10 Thu 30 Jun, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Peter Hoffmann :: Adelaide Proteomics Centre

Introduction to functional data analysis with applications to proteomics data
11:10 Thu 30 Jun, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: A/Prof Inge Koch :: School of Mathematical Sciences

Object oriented data analysis
14:10 Thu 30 Jun, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Steve Marron :: The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Object Oriented Data Analysis is the statistical analysis of populations of complex objects. In the special case of Functional Data Analysis, these data objects are curves, where standard Euclidean approaches, such as principal components analysis, have been very successful. Recent developments in medical image analysis motivate the statistical analysis of populations of more complex data objects which are elements of mildly non-Euclidean spaces, such as Lie Groups and Symmetric Spaces, or of strongly non-Euclidean spaces, such as spaces of tree-structured data objects. These new contexts for Object Oriented Data Analysis create several potentially large new interfaces between mathematics and statistics. Even in situations where Euclidean analysis makes sense, there are statistical challenges because of the High Dimension Low Sample Size problem, which motivates a new type of asymptotics leading to non-standard mathematical statistics.
Object oriented data analysis of tree-structured data objects
15:10 Fri 1 Jul, 2011 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Steve Marron :: The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The field of Object Oriented Data Analysis has made a lot of progress on the statistical analysis of the variation in populations of complex objects. A particularly challenging example of this type is populations of tree-structured objects. Deep challenges arise, which involve a marriage of ideas from statistics, geometry, and numerical analysis, because the space of trees is strongly non-Euclidean in nature. These challenges, together with three completely different approaches to addressing them, are illustrated using a real data example, where each data point is the tree of blood arteries in one person's brain.
Blood flow in the coiled umbilical cord
12:10 Mon 22 Aug, 2011 :: 5.57 Ingkarni Wardli :: Mr David Wilke :: University of Adelaide

The umbilical cord is the connecting cord between the developing embryo or fetus and the placenta. In a normal pregnancy it facilitates the supply of oxygen and nutrients from the placenta, in addition to the return of deoxygenated blood from the fetus. One of the most striking features of the umbilical cord is it's coiled structure, which allows the vasculature to withstand tensile and compressive forces in utero. The level of coiling also has a significant effect on the blood flow and cords exhibiting abnormally high or low levels are known to correlate well with adverse outcomes in pregancy, including fetal demise. In this talk I will discuss the complexities associated with numerically modeling blood flow within the umbilical cord, and provide an outline of the key features which will be investigated throughout my research.
Estimating disease prevalence in hidden populations
14:05 Wed 28 Sep, 2011 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Amber Tomas :: The University of Oxford

Estimating disease prevalence in "hidden" populations such as injecting drug users or men who have sex with men is an important public health issue. However, traditional design-based estimation methods are inappropriate because they assume that a list of all members of the population is available from which to select a sample. Respondent Driven Sampling (RDS) is a method developed over the last 15 years for sampling from hidden populations. Similarly to snowball sampling, it leverages the fact that members of hidden populations are often socially connected to one another. Although RDS is now used around the world, there are several common population characteristics which are known to cause estimates calculated from such samples to be significantly biased. In this talk I'll discuss the motivation for RDS, as well as some of the recent developments in methods of estimation.
Understanding the dynamics of event networks
15:00 Wed 28 Sep, 2011 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Amber Tomas :: The University of Oxford

Within many populations there are frequent communications between pairs of individuals. Such communications might be emails sent within a company, radio communications in a disaster zone or diplomatic communications between states. Often it is of interest to understand the factors that drive the observed patterns of such communications, or to study how these factors are changing over over time. Communications can be thought of as events occuring on the edges of a network which connects individuals in the population. In this talk I'll present a model for such communications which uses ideas from social network theory to account for the complex correlation structure between events. Applications to the Enron email corpus and the dynamics of hospital ward transfer patterns will be discussed.
Statistical analysis of school-based student performance data
12:10 Mon 10 Oct, 2011 :: 5.57 Ingkarni Wardli :: Ms Jessica Tan :: University of Adelaide

Join me in the journey of being a statistician for 15 minutes of your day (if you are not already one) and experience the task of data cleaning without having to get your own hands dirty. Most of you may have sat the Basic Skills Tests when at school or know someone who currently has to do the NAPLAN (National Assessment Program - Literacy and Numeracy) tests. Tests like these assess student progress and can be used to accurately measure school performance. In trying to answer the research question: "what conclusions about student progress and school performance can be drawn from NAPLAN data or data of a similar nature, using mathematical and statistical modelling and analysis techniques?", I have uncovered some interesting results about the data in my initial data analysis which I shall explain in this talk.
Statistical modelling for some problems in bioinformatics
11:10 Fri 14 Oct, 2011 :: B.17 Ingkarni Wardli :: Professor Geoff McLachlan :: The University of Queensland

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In this talk we consider some statistical analyses of data arising in bioinformatics. The problems include the detection of differential expression in microarray gene-expression data, the clustering of time-course gene-expression data and, lastly, the analysis of modern-day cytometric data. Extensions are considered to the procedures proposed for these three problems in McLachlan et al. (Bioinformatics, 2006), Ng et al. (Bioinformatics, 2006), and Pyne et al. (PNAS, 2009), respectively. The latter references are available at http://www.maths.uq.edu.au/~gjm/.
Spinal Research at the University of Adelaide
11:10 Wed 14 Dec, 2011 :: B.17 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Robert Moore :: Adelaide Centre for Spinal Research

Spinal Research at the University of Adelaide
15:10 Fri 10 Feb, 2012 :: B.20 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Robert Moore :: Adelaide Centre for Spinal Research

IGA Workshop: The mathematical implications of gauge-string dualities
09:30 Mon 5 Mar, 2012 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Rajesh Gopakumar :: Harish-Chandra Research Institute

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Lecture series by Rajesh Gopakumar (Harish-Chandra Research Institute). The lectures will be supplemented by talks by other invited speakers.
Financial risk measures - the theory and applications of backward stochastic difference/differential equations with respect to the single jump process
12:10 Mon 26 Mar, 2012 :: 5.57 Ingkarni Wardli :: Mr Bin Shen :: University of Adelaide

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This is my PhD thesis submitted one month ago. Chapter 1 introduces the backgrounds of the research fields. Then each chapter is a published or an accepted paper. Chapter 2, to appear in Methodology and Computing in Applied Probability, establishes the theory of Backward Stochastic Difference Equations with respect to the single jump process in discrete time. Chapter 3, published in Stochastic Analysis and Applications, establishes the theory of Backward Stochastic Differential Equations with respect to the single jump process in continuous time. Chapter 2 and 3 consist of Part I Theory. Chapter 4, published in Expert Systems With Applications, gives some examples about how to measure financial risks by the theory established in Chapter 2. Chapter 5, accepted by Journal of Applied Probability, considers the question of an optimal transaction between two investors to minimize their risks. It's the applications of the theory established in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 and 5 consist of Part II Applications.
P or NP: this is the question
13:10 Tue 22 May, 2012 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Ali Eshragh :: School of Mathematical Sciences

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Up to early 70's, the main concentration of mathematicians was the design of algorithms. However, the advent of computers changed this focus from not just the design of an algorithm but also to the most efficient algorithm. This created a new field of research, namely the complexity of algorithms, and the associated problem "Is P equal to NP?" was born. The latter question has been unknown for more than four decades and is one of the most famous open problems of the 21st century. Any person who can solve this problem will be awarded US$1,000,000 by the Clay Institute. In this talk, we are going to introduce this problem through simple examples and explain one of the intriguing approaches that may help to solve it.
Evaluation and comparison of the performance of Australian and New Zealand intensive care units
14:10 Fri 25 May, 2012 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Jessica Kasza :: The University of Adelaide

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Recently, the Australian Government has emphasised the need for monitoring and comparing the performance of Australian hospitals. Evaluating the performance of intensive care units (ICUs) is of particular importance, given that the most severe cases are treated in these units. Indeed, ICU performance can be thought of as a proxy for the overall performance of a hospital. We compare the performance of the ICUs contributing to the Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Society (ANZICS) Adult Patient Database, the largest of its kind in the world, and identify those ICUs with unusual performance. It is well-known that there are many statistical issues that must be accounted for in the evaluation of healthcare provider performance. Indicators of performance must be appropriately selected and estimated, investigators must adequately adjust for casemix, statistical variation must be fully accounted for, and adjustment for multiple comparisons must be made. Our basis for dealing with these issues is the estimation of a hierarchical logistic model for the in-hospital death of each patient, with patients clustered within ICUs. Both patient- and ICU-level covariates are adjusted for, with a random intercept and random coefficient for the APACHE III severity score. Given that we expect most ICUs to have similar performance after adjustment for these covariates, we follow Ohlssen et al., JRSS A (2007), and estimate a null model that we expect the majority of ICUs to follow. This methodology allows us to rigorously account for the aforementioned statistical issues, and accurately identify those ICUs contributing to the ANZICS database that have comparatively unusual performance. This is joint work with Prof. Patty Solomon and Assoc. Prof. John Moran.
Epidemiological consequences of household-based antiviral prophylaxis for pandemic influenza
14:10 Fri 8 Jun, 2012 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Joshua Ross :: The University of Adelaide

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Antiviral treatment offers a fast acting alternative to vaccination. It is viewed as a first-line of defence against pandemic influenza, protecting families and household members once infection has been detected. In clinical trials antiviral treatment has been shown to be efficacious in preventing infection, limiting disease and reducing transmission, yet their impact at containing the 2009 influenza A(H1N1)pdm outbreak was limited. I will describe some of our work, which attempts to understand this seeming discrepancy, through the development of a general model and computationally efficient methodology for studying household-based interventions. This is joint work with Dr Andrew Black (Adelaide), and Prof. Matt Keeling and Dr Thomas House (Warwick, U.K.).
Differential topology 101
13:10 Fri 17 Aug, 2012 :: Engineering North 218 :: Dr Nicholas Buchdahl :: University of Adelaide

Much of my recent research been directed at a problem in the theory of compact complex surfaces---trying to fill in a gap in the Enriques-Kodaira classification. Attempting to classify some collection of mathematical objects is a very common activity for pure mathematicians, and there are many well-known examples of successful classification schemes; for example, the classification of finite simple groups, and the classification of simply connected topological 4-manifolds. The aim of this talk will be to illustrate how techniques from differential geometry can be used to classify compact surfaces. The level of the talk will be very elementary, and the material is all very well known, but it is sometimes instructive to look back over simple cases of a general problem with the benefit of experience to gain greater insight into the more general and difficult cases.
Infectious diseases modelling: from biology to public health policy
15:10 Fri 24 Aug, 2012 :: B.20 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr James McCaw :: The University of Melbourne

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The mathematical study of human-to-human transmissible pathogens has established itself as a complementary methodology to the traditional epidemiological approach. The classic susceptible--infectious--recovered model paradigm has been used to great effect to gain insight into the epidemiology of endemic diseases such as influenza and pertussis, and the emergence of novel pathogens such as SARS and pandemic influenza. The modelling paradigm has also been taken within the host and used to explain the within-host dynamics of viral (or bacterial or parasite) infections, with implications for our understanding of infection, emergence of drug resistance and optimal drug-interventions. In this presentation I will provide an overview of the mathematical paradigm used to investigate both biological and epidemiological infectious diseases systems, drawing on case studies from influenza, malaria and pertussis research. I will conclude with a summary of how infectious diseases modelling has assisted the Australian government in developing its pandemic preparedness and response strategies.
Probability, what can it tell us about health?
13:10 Tue 9 Oct, 2012 :: 7.15 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Nigel Bean :: School of Mathematical Sciences

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Clinical trials are the way in which modern medical systems test whether individual treatments are worthwhile. Sophisticated statistics is used to try and make the conclusions from clinical trials as meaningful as possible. What can a very simple probability model then tell us about the worth of multiple treatments? What might the implications of this be for the whole health system?

This talk is based on research currently being conducted with a physician at a major Adelaide hospital. It requires no health knowledge and was not tested on animals. All you need is an enquiring and open mind.
Multi-scale models of evolutionary epidemiology: where is HIV going?
14:00 Fri 19 Oct, 2012 :: Napier 205 :: Dr Lorenzo Pellis :: The University of Warwick

An important component of pathogen evolution at the population level is evolution within hosts, which can alter the composition of genotypes available for transmission as infection progresses. I will present a deterministic multi-scale model, linking the within-host competition dynamics with the transmission dynamics at a population level. I will take HIV as an example of how this framework can help clarify the conflicting evolutionary pressure an infectious disease might be subject to.
Epidemic models in socially structured populations: when are simple models too simple?
14:00 Thu 25 Oct, 2012 :: 5.56 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Lorenzo Pellis :: The University of Warwick

Both age and household structure are recognised as important heterogeneities affecting epidemic spread of infectious pathogens, and many models exist nowadays that include either or both forms of heterogeneity. However, different models may fit aggregate epidemic data equally well and nevertheless lead to different predictions of public health interest. I will here present an overview of stochastic epidemic models with increasing complexity in their social structure, focusing in particular on households models. For these models, I will present recent results about the definition and computation of the basic reproduction number R0 and its relationship with other threshold parameters. Finally, I will use these results to compare models with no, either or both age and household structure, with the aim of quantifying the conditions under which each form of heterogeneity is relevant and therefore providing some criteria that can be used to guide model design for real-time predictions.
Epidemic models in socially structured populations: when are simple models too simple?
14:00 Thu 25 Oct, 2012 :: 5.56 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Lorenzo Pellis :: The University of Warwick

Both age and household structure are recognised as important heterogeneities affecting epidemic spread of infectious pathogens, and many models exist nowadays that include either or both forms of heterogeneity. However, different models may fit aggregate epidemic data equally well and nevertheless lead to different predictions of public health interest. I will here present an overview of stochastic epidemic models with increasing complexity in their social structure, focusing in particular on households models. For these models, I will present recent results about the definition and computation of the basic reproduction number R0 and its relationship with other threshold parameters. Finally, I will use these results to compare models with no, either or both age and household structure, with the aim of quantifying the conditions under which each form of heterogeneity is relevant and therefore providing some criteria that can be used to guide model design for real-time predictions.
Fair and Loathing in State Parliament
12:10 Mon 29 Oct, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Mr Casey Briggs :: University of Adelaide

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The South Australian electoral system has a history of bias, malapportionment and perceived unfairness. These days, it is typical of most systems across Australia, except with one major difference - a specific legislated criterion designed to force the system to be 'fair'. In reality, fairness is a hard concept to define, and an even harder concept to enforce. In this talk I will briefly take you through the history of South Australian electoral reform, the current state of affairs and my proposed research. There will be very little in the way of rigorous mathematics. No knowledge of politics is assumed, but an understanding of the process of voting would be useful.
Numerical Free Probability: Computing Eigenvalue Distributions of Algebraic Manipulations of Random Matrices
15:10 Fri 2 Nov, 2012 :: B.20 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Sheehan Olver :: The University of Sydney

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Suppose that the global eigenvalue distributions of two large random matrices A and B are known. It is a remarkable fact that, generically, the eigenvalue distribution of A + B and (if A and B are positive definite) A*B are uniquely determined from only the eigenvalue distributions of A and B; i.e., no information about eigenvectors are required. These operations on eigenvalue distributions are described by free probability theory. We construct a numerical toolbox that can efficiently and reliably calculate these operations with spectral accuracy, by exploiting the complex analytical framework that underlies free probability theory.
A glimpse at the Langlands program
15:10 Fri 12 Apr, 2013 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Masoud Kamgarpour :: University of Queensland

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Abstract: In the late 1960s, Robert Langlands made a series of surprising conjectures relating fundamental concepts from number theory, representation theory, and algebraic geometry. Langlands' conjectures soon developed into a high-profile international research program known as the Langlands program. Many fundamental problems, including the Shimura-Taniyama-Weil conjecture (partially settled by Andrew Wiles in his proof of the Fermat's Last Theorem), are particular cases of the Langlands program. In this talk, I will discuss some of the motivation and results in this program.
Colour
12:10 Mon 13 May, 2013 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Lyron Winderbaum :: University of Adelaide

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Colour is a powerful tool in presenting data, but it can be tricky to choose just the right colours to represent your data honestly - do the colours used in your heatmap overemphasise the differences between particular values over others? does your choice of colours overemphasize one when they should be represented as equal? etc. All these questions are fundamentally based in how we perceive colour. There has been alot of research into how we perceive colour in the past century, and some interesting results. I will explain how a `standard observer' was found empirically and used to develop an absolute reference standard for colour in 1931. How although the common Red-Green-Blue representation of colour is useful and intuitive, distances between colours in this space do not reflect our perception of difference between colours and how alternative, perceptually focused colourspaces where introduced in 1976. I will go on to explain how these results can be used to provide simple mechanisms by which to choose colours that satisfy particular properties such as being equally different from each other, or being linearly more different in sequence, or maintaining such properties when transferred to greyscale, or for a colourblind person.
Invariant Theory: The 19th Century and Beyond
15:10 Fri 21 Jun, 2013 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Jarod Alper :: Australian National University

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A central theme in 19th century mathematics was invariant theory, which was viewed as a bridge between geometry and algebra. David Hilbert revolutionized the field with two seminal papers in 1890 and 1893 with techniques such as Hilbert's basis theorem, Hilbert's Nullstellensatz and Hilbert's syzygy theorem that spawned the modern field of commutative algebra. After Hilbert's groundbreaking work, the field of invariant theory remained largely inactive until the 1960's when David Mumford revitalized the field by reinterpreting Hilbert's ideas in the context of algebraic geometry which ultimately led to the influential construction of the moduli space of smooth curves. Today invariant theory remains a vital research area with connections to various mathematical disciplines: representation theory, algebraic geometry, commutative algebra, combinatorics and nonlinear differential operators. The goal of this talk is to provide an introduction to invariant theory with an emphasis on Hilbert's and Mumford's contributions. Time permitting, I will explain recent research with Maksym Fedorchuk and David Smyth which exploits the ideas of Hilbert, Mumford as well as Kempf to answer a classical question concerning the stability of algebraic curves.
The Hamiltonian Cycle Problem and Markov Decision Processes
15:10 Fri 2 Aug, 2013 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Jerzy Filar :: Flinders University

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We consider the famous Hamiltonian cycle problem (HCP) embedded in a Markov decision process (MDP). More specifically, we consider a moving object on a graph G where, at each vertex, a controller may select an arc emanating from that vertex according to a probabilistic decision rule. A stationary policy is simply a control where these decision rules are time invariant. Such a policy induces a Markov chain on the vertices of the graph. Therefore, HCP is equivalent to a search for a stationary policy that induces a 0-1 probability transition matrix whose non-zero entries trace out a Hamiltonian cycle in the graph. A consequence of this embedding is that we may consider the problem over a number of, alternative, convex - rather than discrete - domains. These include: (a) the space of stationary policies, (b) the more restricted but, very natural, space of doubly stochastic matrices induced by the graph, and (c) the associated spaces of so-called "occupational measures". This approach to the HCP has led to both theoretical and algorithmic approaches to the underlying HCP problem. In this presentation, we outline a selection of results generated by this line of research.
Symplectic Lie groups
12:10 Fri 9 Aug, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B19 :: Dr Wolfgang Globke :: University of Adelaide

A "symplectic Lie group" is a Lie group G with a symplectic form such that G acts by symplectic transformations on itself. Such a G cannot be semisimple, so the research focuses on solvable symplectic Lie groups. In the compact case, a classification of these groups is known. In many cases, a solvable symplectic Lie group G is a cotangent bundle of a flat Lie group H. Then H is a Lagrange subgroup of G, meaning its Lie algebra h is isotropic in the Lie algebra g of G. The existence of Lagrange subalgebras or ideals in g is an important question which relates to many problems in the general structure theory of symplectic Lie groups. In my talk, I will give a brief overview of the known results in this field, ranging from the 1970s to a very recent structure theory.
Lost in Space: Point Pattern Matching and Astrometry
12:35 Mon 14 Oct, 2013 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Annie Conway :: University of Adelaide

Astrometry is the field of research that concerns the positions of objects in space. This can be useful for satellite tracking where we would like to know accurate positions of satellites at given times. Telescopes give us some idea of the position, but unfortunately they are not very precise. However, if a photograph of a satellite has stars in the background, we can use that information to refine our estimate of the location of the image, since the positions of stars are known to high accuracy and are readily available in star catalogues. But there are billions of stars in the sky so first we would need to determine which ones we're actually looking at. In this talk I will give a brief introduction to astrometry and walk through a point pattern matching algorithm for identifying stars in a photograph.
Modelling and optimisation of group dose-response challenge experiments
12:10 Mon 28 Oct, 2013 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: David Price :: University of Adelaide

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An important component of scientific research is the 'experiment'. Effective design of these experiments is important and, accordingly, has received significant attention under the heading 'optimal experimental design'. However, until recently, little work has been done on optimal experimental design for experiments where the underlying process can be modelled by a Markov chain. In this talk, I will discuss some of the work that has been done in the field of optimal experimental design for Markov Chains, and some of the work that I have done in applying this theory to dose-response challenge experiments for the bacteria Campylobacter jejuni in chickens.
Recent developments in special holonomy manifolds
12:10 Fri 1 Nov, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli 7.15 :: Prof Robert Bryant :: Duke University

One of the big classification results in differential geometry from the past century has been the classification of the possible holonomies of affine manifolds, with the major first step having been taken by Marcel Berger in his 1954 thesis. However, Berger's classification was only partial, and, in the past 20 years, an extensive research effort has been expended to complete this classification and extend it in a number of ways. In this talk, after recounting the major parts of the history of the subject, I will discuss some of the recent results and surprising new examples discovered as a by-product of research into Finsler geometry. If time permits, I will also discuss some of the open problems in the subject.
Developing Multiscale Methodologies for Computational Fluid Mechanics
12:10 Mon 11 Nov, 2013 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Hammad Alotaibi :: University of Adelaide

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Recently the development of multiscale methods is one of the most fertile research areas in mathematics, physics, engineering and computer science. The need for multiscale modeling comes usually from the fact that the available macroscale models are not accurate enough, and the microscale models are not efficient enough. By combining both viewpoints, one hopes to arrive at a reasonable compromise between accuracy and efficiency. In this seminar I will give an overview of the recent efforts on developing multiscale methods such as patch dynamics scheme which is used to address an important class of time dependent multiscale problems.
A gentle introduction to bubble evolution in Hele-Shaw flows
15:10 Fri 22 Nov, 2013 :: 5.58 (Ingkarni Wardli) :: Dr Scott McCue :: QUT

A Hele-Shaw cell is easy to make and serves as a fun toy for an applied mathematician to play with. If we inject air into a Hele-Shaw cell that is otherwise filled with viscous fluid, we can observe a bubble of air growing in size. The process is highly unstable, and the bubble boundary expands in an uneven fashion, leading to striking fingering patterns (look up Hele-Shaw cell or Saffman-Taylor instability on YouTube). From a mathematical perspective, modelling these Hele-Shaw flows is interesting because the governing equations are sufficiently ``simple'' that a considerable amount of analytical progress is possible. Indeed, there is no other context in which (genuinely) two-dimensional moving boundary problems are so tractable. More generally, Hele-Shaw flows are important as they serve as prototypes for more complicated (and important) physical processes such as crystal growth and diffusion limited aggregation. I will give an introduction to some of the main ideas and summarise some of my present research in this area.
Network-based approaches to classification and biomarker identification in metastatic melanoma
15:10 Fri 2 May, 2014 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Associate Professor Jean Yee Hwa Yang :: The University of Sydney

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Finding prognostic markers has been a central question in much of current research in medicine and biology. In the last decade, approaches to prognostic prediction within a genomics setting are primarily based on changes in individual genes / protein. Very recently, however, network based approaches to prognostic prediction have begun to emerge which utilize interaction information between genes. This is based on the believe that large-scale molecular interaction networks are dynamic in nature and changes in these networks, rather than changes in individual genes/proteins, are often drivers of complex diseases such as cancer. In this talk, I use data from stage III melanoma patients provided by Prof. Mann from Melanoma Institute of Australia to discuss how network information can be utilize in the analysis of gene expression analysis to aid in biological interpretation. Here, we explore a number of novel and previously published network-based prediction methods, which we will then compare to the common single-gene and gene-set methods with the aim of identifying more biologically interpretable biomarkers in the form of networks.
Computing with groups
15:10 Fri 30 May, 2014 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Heiko Dietrich :: Monash University

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Groups are algebraic structures which show up in many branches of mathematics and other areas of science; Computational Group Theory is on the cutting edge of pure research in group theory and its interplay with computational methods. In this talk, we consider a practical aspect of Computational Group Theory: how to represent a group in a computer, and how to work with such a description efficiently. We will first recall some well-established methods for permutation group; we will then discuss some recent progress for matrix groups.
Mathematics: a castle in the sky?
14:10 Mon 25 Aug, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli 715 Conference Room :: Dr. David Roberts :: School of Mathematical Sciences

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At university you are exposed to more rigorous mathematics than at school, exemplified by definitions such as those of real numbers individually or as a whole. However, what does mathematics ultimately rest on? Definitions depend on things defined earlier, and this process must stop at some point. Mathematicians expended a lot of energy in the late 19th and early 20th centuries trying to pin down the absolutely fundamental ideas of mathematics, with unexpected results. The results of these efforts are called foundations and are still an area of active research today. This talk will explain what foundations are, some of the historical setting in which they arose, and several of the various systems on which mathematics can be built -- and why most of the mathematics you will do only uses a tiny portion of it!
Testing Statistical Association between Genetic Pathways and Disease Susceptibility
12:10 Mon 1 Sep, 2014 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Andy Pfieffer :: University of Adelaide

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A major research area is the identification of genetic pathways associated with various diseases. However, a detailed comparison of methods that have been designed to ascertain the association between pathways and diseases has not been performed. I will give the necessary biological background behind Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS), and explain the shortfalls in traditional GWAS methodologies. I will then explore various methods that use information about genetic pathways in GWAS, and explain the challenges in comparing these methods.
Exploration vs. Exploitation with Partially Observable Gaussian Autoregressive Arms
15:00 Mon 29 Sep, 2014 :: Engineering North N132 :: Julia Kuhn :: The University of Queensland & The University of Amsterdam

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We consider a restless bandit problem with Gaussian autoregressive arms, where the state of an arm is only observed when it is played and the state-dependent reward is collected. Since arms are only partially observable, a good decision policy needs to account for the fact that information about the state of an arm becomes more and more obsolete while the arm is not being played. Thus, the decision maker faces a tradeoff between exploiting those arms that are believed to be currently the most rewarding (i.e. those with the largest conditional mean), and exploring arms with a high conditional variance. Moreover, one would like the decision policy to remain tractable despite the infinite state space and also in systems with many arms. A policy that gives some priority to exploration is the Whittle index policy, for which we establish structural properties. These motivate a parametric index policy that is computationally much simpler than the Whittle index but can still outperform the myopic policy. Furthermore, we examine the many-arm behavior of the system under the parametric policy, identifying equations describing its asymptotic dynamics. Based on these insights we provide a simple heuristic algorithm to evaluate the performance of index policies; the latter is used to optimize the parametric index.
Micro Magnetofluidics - Wireless Manipulation for Microfluidics
15:10 Fri 24 Oct, 2014 :: N.132 Engineering North :: Professor Nam-Trung Nguyen :: Griffith University

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Microfluidics is rich in multi-physics phenomena, which offer fundamentally new capabilities in the manipulation and detection of biological particles. Most current microfluidic applications are based on hydrodynamic, electrokinetic, acoustic and optic actuation. Implementing these concepts requires bulky external pumping/valving systems and energy supplies. The required wires and connectors make their fabrication and handling difficult. Most of the conventional approaches induce heat that may affect sensitive bio particles such as cells. There is a need for a technology for fluid handling in microfluidic devices that is of low-cost, simple, wireless, free of induced heat and independent of pH level or ion concentration. The use of magnetism would provide a wireless solution for this need. Micro magnetofluidics is a newly established research field that links magnetism and microfluidics to gain new capabilities. Magnetism provides a convenient and wireless way for control and manipulation of fluid flow in the microscale. Investigation of magnetism-induced phenomena in a microfluidic device has the advantage of well-defined experimental condition such as temperature and magnetic field because of the system size. This talk presents recent interesting phenomena in both continuous-flow and digital micro magnetofluidics.
Modelling segregation distortion in multi-parent crosses
15:00 Mon 17 Nov, 2014 :: 5.57 Ingkarni Wardli :: Rohan Shah (joint work with B. Emma Huang and Colin R. Cavanagh) :: The University of Queensland

Construction of high-density genetic maps has been made feasible by low-cost high-throughput genotyping technology; however, the process is still complicated by biological, statistical and computational issues. A major challenge is the presence of segregation distortion, which can be caused by selection, difference in fitness, or suppression of recombination due to introgressed segments from other species. Alien introgressions are common in major crop species, where they have often been used to introduce beneficial genes from wild relatives. Segregation distortion causes problems at many stages of the map construction process, including assignment to linkage groups and estimation of recombination fractions. This can result in incorrect ordering and estimation of map distances. While discarding markers will improve the resulting map, it may result in the loss of genomic regions under selection or containing beneficial genes (in the case of introgression). To correct for segregation distortion we model it explicitly in the estimation of recombination fractions. Previously proposed methods introduce additional parameters to model the distortion, with a corresponding increase in computing requirements. This poses difficulties for large, densely genotyped experimental populations. We propose a method imposing minimal additional computational burden which is suitable for high-density map construction in large multi-parent crosses. We demonstrate its use modelling the known Sr36 introgression in wheat for an eight-parent complex cross.
Topology Tomography with Spatial Dependencies
15:00 Tue 25 Nov, 2014 :: Engineering North N132 :: Darryl Veitch :: The University of Melbourne

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There has been quite a lot of tomography inference work on measurement networks with a tree topology. Here observations are made, at the leaves of the tree, of `probes' sent down from the root and copied at each branch point. Inference can be performed based on loss or delay information carried by probes, and used in order to recover loss parameters, delay parameters, or the topology, of the tree. In all of these a strong assumption of spatial independence between links in the tree has been made in prior work. I will describe recent work on topology inference, based on loss measurement, which breaks that assumption. In particular I will introduce a new model class for loss with non trivial spatial dependence, the `Jump Independent Models', which are well motivated, and prove that within this class the topology is identifiable.
Queues and cooperative games
15:00 Fri 18 Sep, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli B21 :: Moshe Haviv :: Department of Statistics and the Federmann Center for the Study of Rationality, The Hebrew Universit

Media...
The area of cooperative game theory deals with models in which a number of individuals, called players, can form coalitions so as to improve the utility of its members. In many cases, the formation of the grand coalition is a natural result of some negotiation or a bargaining procedure. The main question then is how the players should split the gains due to their cooperation among themselves. Various solutions have been suggested among them the Shapley value, the nucleolus and the core.

Servers in a queueing system can also join forces. For example, they can exchange service capacity among themselves or serve customers who originally seek service at their peers. The overall performance improves and the question is how they should split the gains, or, equivalently, how much each one of them needs to pay or be paid in order to cooperate with the others. Our major focus is in the core of the resulting cooperative game and in showing that in many queueing games the core is not empty.

Finally, customers who are served by the same server can also be looked at as players who form a grand coalition, now inflicting damage on each other in the form of additional waiting time. We show how cooperative game theory, specifically the Aumann-Shapley prices, leads to a way in which this damage can be attributed to individual customers or groups of customers.
Ocean dynamics of Gulf St Vincent: a numerical study
12:10 Mon 2 Nov, 2015 :: Benham Labs G10 :: Henry Ellis :: University of Adelaide

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The aim of this research is to determine the physical dynamics of ocean circulation within Gulf St. Vincent, South Australia, and the exchange of momentum, nutrients, heat, salt and other water properties between the gulf and shelf via Investigator Strait and Backstairs Passage. The project aims to achieve this through the creation of high-resolution numerical models, combined with new and historical observations from a moored instrument package, satellite data, and shipboard surveys. The quasi-realistic high-resolution models are forced using boundary conditions generated by existing larger scale ROMS models, which in turn are forced at the boundary by a global model, creating a global to regional to local model network. Climatological forcing is done using European Centres for Medium range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF) data sets and is consistent over the regional and local models. A series of conceptual models are used to investigate the relative importance of separate physical processes in addition to fully forced quasi-realistic models. An outline of the research to be undertaken is given: • Connectivity of Gulf St. Vincent with shelf waters including seasonal variation due to wind and thermoclinic patterns; • The role of winter time cooling and formation of eddies in flushing the gulf; • The formation of a temperature front within the gulf during summer time; and • The connectivity and importance of nutrient rich, cool, water upwelling from the Bonney Coast with the gulf via Backstairs Passage during summer time.
Modelling Coverage in RNA Sequencing
09:00 Mon 9 Nov, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli 5.57 :: Arndt von Haeseler :: Max F Perutz Laboratories, University of Vienna

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RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) is the method of choice for measuring the expression of RNAs in a cell population. In an RNA-seq experiment, sequencing the full length of larger RNA molecules requires fragmentation into smaller pieces to be compatible with limited read lengths of most deep-sequencing technologies. Unfortunately, the issue of non-uniform coverage across a genomic feature has been a concern in RNA-seq and is attributed to preferences for certain fragments in steps of library preparation and sequencing. However, the disparity between the observed non-uniformity of read coverage in RNA-seq data and the assumption of expected uniformity elicits a query on the read coverage profile one should expect across a transcript, if there are no biases in the sequencing protocol. We propose a simple model of unbiased fragmentation where we find that the expected coverage profile is not uniform and, in fact, depends on the ratio of fragment length to transcript length. To compare the non-uniformity proposed by our model with experimental data, we extended this simple model to incorporate empirical attributes matching that of the sequenced transcript in an RNA-seq experiment. In addition, we imposed an experimentally derived distribution on the frequency at which fragment lengths occur.

We used this model to compare our theoretical prediction with experimental data and with the uniform coverage model. If time permits, we will also discuss a potential application of our model.
Use of epidemic models in optimal decision making
15:00 Thu 19 Nov, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli 5.57 :: Tim Kinyanjui :: School of Mathematics, The University of Manchester

Media...
Epidemic models have proved useful in a number of applications in epidemiology. In this work, I will present two areas that we have used modelling to make informed decisions. Firstly, we have used an age structured mathematical model to describe the transmission of Respiratory Syncytial Virus in a developed country setting and to explore different vaccination strategies. We found that delayed infant vaccination has significant potential in reducing the number of hospitalisations in the most vulnerable group and that most of the reduction is due to indirect protection. It also suggests that marked public health benefit could be achieved through RSV vaccine delivered to age groups not seen as most at risk of severe disease. The second application is in the optimal design of studies aimed at collection of household-stratified infection data. A design decision involves making a trade-off between the number of households to enrol and the sampling frequency. Two commonly used study designs are considered: cross-sectional and cohort. The search for an optimal design uses Bayesian methods to explore the joint parameter-design space combined with Shannon entropy of the posteriors to estimate the amount of information for each design. We found that for the cross-sectional designs, the amount of information increases with the sampling intensity while the cohort design often exhibits a trade-off between the number of households sampled and the intensity of follow-up. Our results broadly support the choices made in existing data collection studies.
Group meeting
15:10 Fri 20 Nov, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Mr Jack Keeler :: University of East Anglia / University of Adelaide

Title: Stability of free-surface flow over topography Abstract: The forced KdV equation is used as a model to analyse the wave behaviour on the free surface in response to prescribed topographic forcing. The research involves computing steady solutions using numeric and asymptotic techniques and then analysing the stability of these steady solutions in time-dependent calculations. Stability is analysed by computing the eigenvalue spectra of the linearised fKdV operator and by exploiting the Hamiltonian structure of the fKdV. Future work includes analysing the solution space for a corrugated topography and investigating the 3 dimensional problem using the KP equation. + Any items for group discussion
Group meeting
15:10 Fri 20 Nov, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Mr Jack Keeler :: University of East Anglia / University of Adelaide

Title: Stability of free-surface flow over topography Abstract: The forced KdV equation is used as a model to analyse the wave behaviour on the free surface in response to prescribed topographic forcing. The research involves computing steady solutions using numeric and asymptotic techniques and then analysing the stability of these steady solutions in time-dependent calculations. Stability is analysed by computing the eigenvalue spectra of the linearised fKdV operator and by exploiting the Hamiltonian structure of the fKdV. Future work includes analysing the solution space for a corrugated topography and investigating the 3 dimensional problem using the KP equation. + Any items for group discussion
A Semi-Markovian Modeling of Limit Order Markets
13:00 Fri 11 Dec, 2015 :: Ingkarni Wardli 5.57 :: Anatoliy Swishchuk :: University of Calgary

Media...
R. Cont and A. de Larrard (SIAM J. Financial Mathematics, 2013) introduced a tractable stochastic model for the dynamics of a limit order book, computing various quantities of interest such as the probability of a price increase or the diffusion limit of the price process. As suggested by empirical observations, we extend their framework to 1) arbitrary distributions for book events inter-arrival times (possibly non-exponential) and 2) both the nature of a new book event and its corresponding inter-arrival time depend on the nature of the previous book event. We do so by resorting to Markov renewal processes to model the dynamics of the bid and ask queues. We keep analytical tractability via explicit expressions for the Laplace transforms of various quantities of interest. Our approach is justified and illustrated by calibrating the model to the five stocks Amazon, Apple, Google, Intel and Microsoft on June 21st 2012. As in Cont and Larrard, the bid-ask spread remains constant equal to one tick, only the bid and ask queues are modelled (they are independent from each other and get reinitialized after a price change), and all orders have the same size. (This talk is based on our joint paper with Nelson Vadori (Morgan Stanley)).
How predictable are you? Information and happiness in social media.
12:10 Mon 21 Mar, 2016 :: Ingkarni Wardli Conference Room 715 :: Dr Lewis Mitchell :: School of Mathematical Sciences

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The explosion of ``Big Data'' coming from online social networks and the like has opened up the new field of ``computational social science'', which applies a quantitative lens to problems traditionally in the domain of psychologists, anthropologists and social scientists. What does it mean to be influential? How do ideas propagate amongst populations? Is happiness contagious? For the first time, mathematicians, statisticians, and computer scientists can provide insight into these and other questions. Using data from social networks such as Facebook and Twitter, I will give an overview of recent research trends in computational social science, describe some of my own work using techniques like sentiment analysis and information theory in this realm, and explain how you can get involved with this highly rewarding research field as well.
Mathematical modelling of the immune response to influenza
15:00 Thu 12 May, 2016 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Ada Yan :: University of Melbourne

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The immune response plays an important role in the resolution of primary influenza infection and prevention of subsequent infection in an individual. However, the relative roles of each component of the immune response in clearing infection, and the effects of interaction between components, are not well quantified.

We have constructed a model of the immune response to influenza based on data from viral interference experiments, where ferrets were exposed to two influenza strains within a short time period. The changes in viral kinetics of the second virus due to the first virus depend on the strains used as well as the interval between exposures, enabling inference of the timing of innate and adaptive immune response components and the role of cross-reactivity in resolving infection. Our model provides a mechanistic explanation for the observed variation in viruses' abilities to protect against subsequent infection at short inter-exposure intervals, either by delaying the second infection or inducing stochastic extinction of the second virus. It also explains the decrease in recovery time for the second infection when the two strains elicit cross-reactive cellular adaptive immune responses. To account for inter-subject as well as inter-virus variation, the model is formulated using a hierarchical framework. We will fit the model to experimental data using Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods; quantification of the model will enable a deeper understanding of the effects of potential new treatments.
Behavioural Microsimulation Approach to Social Policy and Behavioural Economics
15:10 Fri 20 May, 2016 :: S112 Engineering South :: Dr Drew Mellor :: Ernst & Young

SIMULAIT is a general purpose, behavioural micro-simulation system designed to predict behavioural trends in human populations. This type of predictive capability grew out of original research initially conducted in conjunction with the Defence Science and Technology Group (DSTO) in South Australia, and has been fully commercialised and is in current use by a global customer base. To our customers, the principal value of the system lies in its ability to predict likely outcomes to scenarios that challenge conventional approaches based on extrapolation or generalisation. These types of scenarios include: the impact of disruptive technologies, such as the impact of wide-spread adoption of autonomous vehicles for transportation or batteries for household energy storage; and the impact of effecting policy elements or interventions, such as the impact of imposing water usage restrictions. SIMULAIT employs a multi-disciplinary methodology, drawing from agent-based modelling, behavioural science and psychology, microeconomics, artificial intelligence, simulation, game theory, engineering, mathematics and statistics. In this seminar, we start with a high-level view of the system followed by a look under the hood to see how the various elements come together to answer questions about behavioural trends. The talk will conclude with a case study of a recent application of SIMULAIT to a significant policy problem - how to address the deficiency of STEM skilled teachers in the Victorian teaching workforce.
Some free boundary value problems in mean curvature flow and fully nonlinear curvature flows
12:10 Fri 27 May, 2016 :: Eng & Maths EM205 :: Valentina Wheeler :: University of Wollongong

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In this talk we present an overview of the current research in mean curvature flow and fully nonlinear curvature flows with free boundaries, with particular focus on our own results. Firstly we consider the scenario of a mean curvature flow solution with a ninety-degree angle condition on a fixed hypersurface in Euclidean space, that we call the contact hypersurface. We prove that under restrictions on either the initial hypersurface (such as rotational symmetry) or restrictions on the contact hypersurface the flow exists for all times and converges to a self-similar solution. We also discuss the possibility of a curvature singularity appearing on the free boundary contained in the contact hypersurface. We extend some of these results to the setting of a hypersurface evolving in its normal direction with speed given by a fully nonlinear functional of the principal curvatures.
Time series analysis of paleo-climate proxies (a mathematical perspective)
15:10 Fri 27 May, 2016 :: Engineering South S112 :: Dr Thomas Stemler :: University of Western Australia

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In this talk I will present the work my colleagues from the School of Earth and Environment (UWA), the "trans disciplinary methods" group of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Germany, and I did to explain the dynamics of the Australian-South East Asian monsoon system during the last couple of thousand years. From a time series perspective paleo-climate proxy series are more or less the monsters moving under your bed that wake you up in the middle of the night. The data is clearly non-stationary, non-uniform sampled in time and the influence of stochastic forcing or the level of measurement noise are more or less unknown. Given these undesirable properties almost all traditional time series analysis methods fail. I will highlight two methods that allow us to draw useful conclusions from the data sets. The first one uses Gaussian kernel methods to reconstruct climate networks from multiple proxies. The coupling relationships in these networks change over time and therefore can be used to infer which areas of the monsoon system dominate the complex dynamics of the whole system. Secondly I will introduce the transformation cost time series method, which allows us to detect changes in the dynamics of a non-uniform sampled time series. Unlike the frequently used interpolation approach, our new method does not corrupt the data and therefore avoids biases in any subsequence analysis. While I will again focus on paleo-climate proxies, the method can be used in other applied areas, where regular sampling is not possible.
SIR epidemics with stages of infection
12:10 Wed 28 Sep, 2016 :: EM218 :: Matthieu Simon :: Universite Libre de Bruxelles

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This talk is concerned with a stochastic model for the spread of an epidemic in a closed homogeneously mixing population. The population is subdivided into three classes of individuals: the susceptibles, the infectives and the removed cases. In short, an infective remains infectious during a random period of time. While infected, it can contact all the susceptibles present, independently of the other infectives. At the end of the infectious period, it becomes a removed case and has no further part in the infection process.

We represent an infectious period as a set of different stages that an infective can go through before being removed. The transitions between stages are ruled by either a Markov process or a semi-Markov process. In each stage, an infective makes contaminations at the epochs of a Poisson process with a specific rate.

Our purpose is to derive closed expressions for a transform of different statistics related to the end of the epidemic, such as the final number of susceptibles and the area under the trajectories of all the infectives. The analysis is performed by using simple matrix analytic methods and martingale arguments. Numerical illustrations will be provided at the end of the talk.
Transmission Dynamics of Visceral Leishmaniasis: designing a test and treat control strategy
12:10 Thu 29 Sep, 2016 :: EM218 :: Graham Medley :: London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

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Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL) is targeted for elimination from the Indian Sub-Continent. Progress has been much better in some areas than others. Current control is based on earlier diagnosis and treatment and on insecticide spraying to reduce the density of the vector. There is a surprising dearth of specific information on the epidemiology of VL, which makes modelling more difficult. In this seminar, I describe a simple framework that gives some insight into the transmission dynamics. We conclude that the majority of infection comes from cases prior to diagnosis. If this is the case then, early diagnosis will be advantageous, but will require a test with high specificity. This is a paradox for many clinicians and public health workers, who tend to prioritise high sensitivity.

Medley, G.F., Hollingsworth, T.D., Olliaro, P.L. & Adams, E.R. (2015) Health-seeking, diagnostics and transmission in the control of visceral leishmaniasis. Nature 528, S102-S108 (3 December 2015), DOI: 10.1038/nature16042
Leavitt path algebras
12:10 Fri 2 Dec, 2016 :: Engineering & Math EM213 :: Roozbeh Hazrat :: Western Sydney University

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From a directed graph one can generate an algebra which captures the movements along the graph. One such algebras are Leavitt path algebras. Despite being introduced only 10 years ago, Leavitt path algebras have arisen in a variety of different contexts as diverse as analysis, symbolic dynamics, noncommutative geometry and representation theory. In fact, Leavitt path algebras are algebraic counterpart to graph C*-algebras, a theory which has become an area of intensive research globally. There are strikingly parallel similarities between these two theories. Even more surprisingly, one cannot (yet) obtain the results in one theory as a consequence of the other; the statements look the same, however the techniques to prove them are quite different (as the names suggest, one uses Algebra and other Analysis). These all suggest that there might be a bridge between Algebra and Analysis yet to be uncovered. In this talk, we introduce Leavitt path algebras and try to classify them by means of (graded) Grothendieck groups. We will ask nice questions!
Fast approximate inference for arbitrarily large statistical models via message passing
15:10 Fri 17 Mar, 2017 :: Engineering South S111 :: Prof Matt Wand :: University of Technology Sydney

We explain how the notion of message passing can be used to streamline the algebra and computer coding for fast approximate inference in large Bayesian statistical models. In particular, this approach is amenable to handling arbitrarily large models of particular types once a set of primitive operations is established. The approach is founded upon a message passing formulation of mean field variational Bayes that utilizes factor graph representations of statistical models. The notion of factor graph fragments is introduced and is shown to facilitate compartmentalization of the required algebra and coding.
What are operator algebras and what are they good for?
15:10 Fri 12 May, 2017 :: Engineering South S111 :: Prof Aidan Sims :: University of Wollongong

Back in the early 1900s when people were first grappling with the new ideas of quantum mechanics and looking for mathematical techniques to study them, they found themselves, unavoidably, dealing with what have now become known as operator algebras. As a research area, operator algebras has come a very long way since then, and has spread out to touch on many other areas of mathematics, as well as maintaining its links with mathematical physics. I'll try to convey roughly what operator algebras are, and describe some of the highlights of their career thus far, particularly the more recent ones.
Mathematics is Biology's Next Microscope (Only Better!)
15:10 Fri 11 Aug, 2017 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Dr Robyn Araujo :: Queensland University of Technology

While mathematics has long been considered "an essential tool for physics", the foundations of biology and the life sciences have received significantly less influence from mathematical ideas and theory. In this talk, I will give a brief discussion of my recent research on robustness in molecular signalling networks, as an example of a complex biological question that calls for a mathematical answer. In particular, it has been a long-standing mystery how the extraordinarily complex communication networks inside living cells, comprising thousands of different interacting molecules, are able to function robustly since complexity is generally associated with fragility. Mathematics has now suggested a resolution to this paradox through the discovery that robust adaptive signalling networks must be constructed from a just small number of well-defined universal modules (or "motifs"), connected together. The existence of these newly-discovered modules has important implications for evolutionary biology, embryology and development, cancer research, and drug development.
Mathematics is Biology'€™s Next Microscope (Only Better!)
15:10 Fri 11 Aug, 2017 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Dr Robyn Araujo :: Queensland University of Technology

While mathematics has long been considered “an essential tool for physics", the foundations of biology and the life sciences have received significantly less influence from mathematical ideas and theory. In this talk, I will give a brief discussion of my recent research on robustness in molecular signalling networks, as an example of a complex biological question that calls for a mathematical answer. In particular, it has been a long-standing mystery how the extraordinarily complex communication networks inside living cells, comprising thousands of different interacting molecules, are able to function robustly since complexity is generally associated with fragility. Mathematics has now suggested a resolution to this paradox through the discovery that robust adaptive signalling networks must be constructed from a just small number of well-defined universal modules (or “motifs”), connected together. The existence of these newly-discovered modules has important implications for evolutionary biology, embryology and development, cancer research, and drug development.
Stochastic Modelling of Urban Structure
11:10 Mon 20 Nov, 2017 :: Engineering Nth N132 :: Mark Girolami :: Imperial College London, and The Alan Turing Institute

Media...
Urban systems are complex in nature and comprise of a large number of individuals that act according to utility, a measure of net benefit pertaining to preferences. The actions of individuals give rise to an emergent behaviour, creating the so-called urban structure that we observe. In this talk, I develop a stochastic model of urban structure to formally account for uncertainty arising from the complex behaviour. We further use this stochastic model to infer the components of a utility function from observed urban structure. This is a more powerful modelling framework in comparison to the ubiquitous discrete choice models that are of limited use for complex systems, in which the overall preferences of individuals are difficult to ascertain. We model urban structure as a realization of a Boltzmann distribution that is the invariant distribution of a related stochastic differential equation (SDE) that describes the dynamics of the urban system. Our specification of Boltzmann distribution assigns higher probability to stable configurations, in the sense that consumer surplus (demand) is balanced with running costs (supply), as characterized by a potential function. We specify a Bayesian hierarchical model to infer the components of a utility function from observed structure. Our model is doubly-intractable and poses significant computational challenges that we overcome using recent advances in Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods. We demonstrate our methodology with case studies on the London retail system and airports in England.
Models, machine learning, and robotics: understanding biological networks
15:10 Fri 16 Mar, 2018 :: Horace Lamb 1022 :: Prof Steve Oliver :: University of Cambridge

The availability of complete genome sequences has enabled the construction of computer models of metabolic networks that may be used to predict the impact of genetic mutations on growth and survival. Both logical and constraint-based models of the metabolic network of the model eukaryote, the ale yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, have been available for some time and are continually being improved by the research community. While such models are very successful at predicting the impact of deleting single genes, the prediction of the impact of higher order genetic interactions is a greater challenge. Initial studies of limited gene sets provided encouraging results. However, the availability of comprehensive experimental data for the interactions between genes involved in metabolism demonstrated that, while the models were able to predict the general properties of the genetic interaction network, their ability to predict interactions between specific pairs of metabolic genes was poor. I will examine the reasons for this poor performance and demonstrate ways of improving the accuracy of the models by exploiting the techniques of machine learning and robotics. The utility of these metabolic models rests on the firm foundations of genome sequencing data. However, there are two major problems with these kinds of network models - there is no dynamics, and they do not deal with the uncertain and incomplete nature of much biological data. To deal with these problems, we have developed the Flexible Nets (FNs) modelling formalism. FNs were inspired by Petri Nets and can deal with missing or uncertain data, incorporate both dynamics and regulation, and also have the potential for model predictive control of biotechnological processes.
Interactive theorem proving for mathematicians
15:10 Fri 5 Oct, 2018 :: Napier 208 :: A/Prof Scott Morrison :: Australian National University

Mathematicians use computers to write their proofs (LaTeX), and to do their calculations (Sage, Mathematica, Maple, Matlab, etc, as well as custom code for simulations or searches). However today we rarely use computers to help us to construct and understand proofs. There is a long tradition in computer science of interactive and automatic theorem proving; particularly today these are important tools in engineering correct software, as well as in optimisation and compilation. There have been some notable examples of formalisation of modern mathematics (e.g. the odd order theorem, the Kepler conjecture, and the four-colour theorem). Even in these cases, huge engineering efforts were required to translate the mathematics to a form a computer could understand. Moreover, in most areas of research there is a huge gap between the interests of human mathematicians and the abilities of computer provers. Nevertheless, I think it's time for mathematicians to start getting interested in interactive theorem provers! It's now possible to write proofs, and write tools that help write proofs, in languages which are expressive enough to encompass most of modern mathematics, and ergonomic enough to use for general purpose programming. I'll give an informal introduction to dependent type theory (the logical foundation of many modern theorem provers), some examples of doing mathematics in such a system, and my experiences working with mathematics students in these systems.
Random walks
15:10 Fri 12 Oct, 2018 :: Napier 208 :: A/Prof Kais Hamza :: Monash University

A random walk is arguably the most basic stochastic process one can define. It is also among the most intuitive objects in the theory of probability and stochastic processes. For these and other reasons, it is one of the most studied processes or rather family of processes, finding applications in all areas of science, technology and engineering. In this talk, I will start by recalling some of the classical results for random walks and then discuss some of my own recent explorations in this area of research that has maintained relevance for decades.

News matching "Operations research"

Summer Research Scholarship Applications NOW OPEN
Applications for AMSI Vacation Scholarships and Adelaide Summer Research Scholarships are now OPEN. AMSI Vacation Scholarships: Closing date Friday 16th September. http://vrs.amsi.org.au/ University of Adelaide Summer Research Scholarships: Closing date Friday 7th October. http://www.ecms.adelaide.edu.au/scholarships/summer/ Please submit all Adelaide applications to the School of Mathematical Sciences. Posted Wed 30 Nov -1.

More information...

Dr Yvonne Stokes wins Michell Medal
Dr Yvonne Stokes (Applied Mathematics) was awarded the 2007 J.H. Michell Medal of ANZIAM. The award is made annually to an outstanding new researcher, one who is in the first ten years of their research career. Read Yvonne's citation here. Posted Mon 5 Mar 07.
ARC success
The School of Mathematical Sciences was again very successful in attracting Australian Research Council funding for 2008. Recipients of ARC Discovery Projects are (with staff from the School highlighted):

Prof NG Bean; Prof PG Howlett; Prof CE Pearce; Prof SC Beecham; Dr AV Metcalfe; Dr JW Boland: WaterLog - A mathematical model to implement recommendations of The Wentworth Group.

2008-2010: $645,000

Prof RJ Elliott: Dynamic risk measures. (Australian Professorial Fellowship)

2008-2012: $897,000

Dr MD Finn: Topological Optimisation of Fluid Mixing.

2008-2010: $249,000

Prof PG Bouwknegt; Prof M Varghese; A/Prof S Wu: Dualities in String Theory and Conformal Field Theory in the context of the Geometric Langlands Program.

2008-2010: $240,000

The latter grant is held through the ANU Posted Wed 26 Sep 07.

Potts Medal Winner
Professor Charles Pearce, the Elder Profesor of Mathematics, was awarded the Ren Potts Medal by the Australian Society for Operations Research at its annual meeting in December. This is a national award for outstanding contributions to Operations Research in Australia. Posted Tue 22 Jan 08.
Australian Research Council Discovery Project Successes

Congratulations to the following members of the School for their success in the ARC Discovery Grants which were announced recently.

  • A/Prof M Roughan; Prof H Shen $315K Network Management in a World of Secrets
  • Prof AJ Roberts; Dr D Strunin $315K Effective and accurate model dynamics, deterministic and stochastic, across multiple space and time scales
  • A/Prof J Denier; Prof AP Bassom $180K A novel approach to controlling boundary-layer separation
Posted Wed 17 Sep 08.
Three post-doc positions advertised
The School of Mathematical Sciences is seeking to appoint three post-doctoral research associates. These positions have now closed. Posted Wed 29 Jul 09.
Welcome to Dr Joshua Ross
We welcome Dr Joshua Ross as a new lecturer in the School of Mathematical Sciences. Joshua has moved over to Adelaide from the University of Cambridge. His research interests are mathematical modelling (especially mathematical biology) and operations research. Posted Mon 15 Mar 10.

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Go8-Germany Research Cooperation Scheme
Congratulations to Thomas Leistner whose application under the Go8-Germany Research Co-operation Scheme is one of 24 across Australia to be funded in 2011-2012. Thomas will work with Professor Helga Baum of Humbolt University in Berlin on spinor field equations in global Lorentzian geometry. Posted Thu 4 Nov 10.
Bushfire CRC post-graduate scholarship success
Congratulations to Mika Peace who has been awarded a PhD scholarship from the Bushfire Cooperative Research Centre. Mika is working with Trent Mattner and Graham Mills (from the Bureau of Meteorology) on coupled fire-weather modelling Posted Wed 6 Apr 11.
ARC Grant Success
Congratulations to the following staff who were successful in securing funding from the Australian Research Council Discovery Projects Scheme. Associate Professor Finnur Larusson awarded $270,000 for his project Flexibility and symmetry in complex geometry; Dr Thomas Leistner, awarded $303,464 for his project Holonomy groups in Lorentzian geometry, Professor Michael Murray Murray and Dr Daniel Stevenson (Glasgow), awarded $270,000 for their project Bundle gerbes: generalisations and applications; Professor Mathai Varghese, awarded $105,000 for his project Advances in index theory and Prof Anthony Roberts and Professor Ioannis Kevrekidis (Princeton) awarded $330,000 for their project Accurate modelling of large multiscale dynamical systems for engineering and scientific simulation and analysis Posted Tue 8 Nov 11.
More ARC Grant Success
The School has followed up its success in the ARC Discovery Project Scheme with a Future Fellowship being awarded to Dr Thomas Leistner and DECRAs award to Dr Pedram Hekmati and Dr Robert Yuncken. This brings the total number of ARC research grants to the School to 8 in 2011, which amounts to 14% of the total ARC grants awarded to the University of Adelaide in 2011. Posted Tue 15 Nov 11.
The mathematical implications of gauge-string dualities
Between Monday 5 and Friday 9 March 2012, the Institute for Geometry and its Applications will host a lecture series by Rajesh Gopakumar from the Harish-Chandra Research Institute. These lectures will be supplemented by talks by other invited speakers. Posted Tue 6 Dec 11.

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Two contract positions are available
As a result of the School's success in securing two prestigious Australian Research Council Future Fellowships, we now have two limited term positions available, one in Pure Mathematics and one in Statistics. Posted Wed 14 Dec 11.
Summer Research Student Thomas Brown wins the AMSI/Cambridge University Press Prize for 2013
Congratulations to Thomas Brown, jointly supervised by Ed Green and Ben Binder who won the AMSI/Cambridge University Press Prize for the best talk at the 2013 CSIRO Big Day In, recently held this month. After completion of their summer project, vacation scholars must submit a project report which summarises the project and addresses the nature of the topic, methods of investigation, results found, and benefits of the experience. The scholars then present a 15-minute presentation about their project at the CSIRO Big Day In (BDI). This experience enables students to meet and socialise with their peers, gain experience presenting to their colleagues and supervisors and learn about a range of careers in science by interacting with several CSIRO scientists (including mathematicians) in a discussion panel. This is a very pleasing result for Thomas, Ed and Ben as well as for the School of Mathematical Sciences. Well done Thomas. Posted Fri 15 Feb 13.
Summer Research Scholarship Applications now Open
Applications for AMSI Vacation Scholarships and Adelaide Summer Research Scholarships are now OPEN.

Refer here for a list of possible Summer Research topics. See the links below for further information:

AMSI Vacation Scholarships: Closing date Tuesday 17th September
http://www.amsi.org.au/index.php/higher-education/vacation-research-scholarships
University of Adelaide Summer Research Scholarships: Closing date Friday 11th October.
http://www.adelaide.edu.au/scholarships/undergrad/asrs.html

Posted Thu 15 Aug 13.
Summer Research Scholarship Applications NOW OPEN

Please refer HERE for a list of possible Summer Research Topics.

AMSI Vacation Scholarships: Closing date Friday 16th September. http://vrs.amsi.org.au/

University of Adelaide Summer Research Scholarships: Closing date Friday 7th October. http://www.ecms.adelaide.edu.au/scholarships/summer/

Posted Fri 26 Aug 16.

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A/Prof Joshua Ross, 2017 Moran Medal recipient
Congratulations to Associate Professor Joshua Ross who has won the 2017 Moran Medal, awarded by the Australian Academy of Science. The Moran Medal recognises outstanding research by scientists up to 10 years post-PhD in applied probability, biometrics, mathematical genetics, psychometrics and statistics. Associate Professor Ross has made influential contributions to public health and conservation biology using mathematical modelling and statistics to help in decision making. Posted Fri 23 Dec 16.

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ARC grant recipients
The School of Mathematical Sciences wishes to warmly congratulate the school recipients of the latest ARC grant round which was announced on Tuesday, 1 November. These grants include 1 Future Fellowship (Y. Stokes), 1 Discovery Early Career Research Award (Guo Chuan Thiang) and 1 Discovery Project grant (Varghese, Baraglia). Posted Fri 23 Dec 16.
Elder Professor Mathai Varghese Awarded Australian Laureate Fellowship
Professor Mathai Varghese, Elder Professor of Mathematics in the School of Mathematical Sciences, has been awarded an Australian Laureate Fellowship worth $1.64 million to advance Index Theory and its applications. The project is expected to enhance Australia’s position at the forefront of international research in geometric analysis. Posted Thu 15 Jun 17.

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Elder Professor Mathai Varghese Awarded Australian Laureate Fellowship
Professor Mathai Varghese, Elder Professor of Mathematics in the School of Mathematical Sciences, has been awarded an Australian Laureate Fellowship worth $1.64 million to advance Index Theory and its applications. The project will enhance Australia's position at the forefront of international research in geometric analysis. Posted Thu 15 Jun 17.

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Publications matching "Operations research"

Publications
On risk minimizing portfolios under a Markovian regime-switching Black-Scholes economy
Elliott, Robert; Siu, T, Annals of Operations Research 1 (1–21) 2009
A mixer design for the pigtail braid
Binder, Benjamin; Cox, Stephen, Fluid Dynamics Research 40 (34–44) 2008
A space-time Neyman-Scott rainfall model with defined storm extent
Leonard, Michael; Lambert, Martin; Metcalfe, Andrew; Cowpertwait, P, Water Resources Research 44 (9402–9402) 2008
Assessing the potential usefulness of IGF-related peptides and adiponectin for predicting disease risk
Belobrajdic, Damien; Priebe, I; Forbes, Briony; Flyvbjerg, A; Chen, J; Cosgrove, L; Frystyk, J; Saunders, Ian, Growth Hormone & IGF Research 18 (198–204) 2008
Markovian trees: properties and algorithms
Bean, Nigel; Kontoleon, Nectarios; Taylor, Peter, Annals of Operations Research 160 (31–50) 2008
Performance measures of a multi-layer Markovian fluid model
Bean, Nigel; O'Reilly, Malgorzata, Annals of Operations Research 160 (99–120) 2008
Microarray gene expression profiling of osteoarthritic bone suggests altered bone remodelling, WNT and transforming growth factor-beta/bone morphogenic protein signalling
Hopwood, Blair; Tsykin, Anna; Findlay, David; Fazzalari, Nicola, Arthritis Research & Therapy 9 (WWW 1–WWW 21) 2007
Efficient simulation of a space-time Neyman-Scott rainfall model
Leonard, Michael; Metcalfe, Andrew; Lambert, Martin, Water Resources Research 42 (11503–11503) 2006
Formal adjoints and canonical form for linear operations
Eastwood, Michael; Gover, A, Conformal Geometry and Dynamics 10 (285–287) 2006
Methodology in meta-analysis: a study from critical care meta-analytic practice
Moran, John; Solomon, Patricia; Warn, D, Health Services and Outcomes Research Methodology 5 (207–226) 2006
Lifting surfaces with circular planforms
Tuck, Ernest; Lazauskas, Leo, Journal of Ship Research 49 (274–278) 2005
Optimal recursive estimation of raw data
Torokhti, Anatoli; Howlett, P; Pearce, Charles, Annals of Operations Research 133 (285–302) 2005
The cross-entropy method for network reliability estimation
Hui, Kin-Ping; Bean, Nigel; Kraetzl, Miro; Kroese, D, Annals of Operations Research 134 (101–118) 2005
The effect of World War 1 and the 1918 influenza pandemic on cohort life expectancy of South Australian males born in 1881-1900
Leppard, Phillip; Tallis, George; Pearce, Charles, Journal of Population Research 21 (161–176) 2004
Arbitrage in a Discrete Version of the Wick-Fractional Black Scholes Model
Bender, C; Elliott, Robert, Mathematics of Operations Research 29 (935–945) 2004
Numerical error in groundwater flow and solute transport simulation
Woods, Juliette; Teubner, Michael; Simmons, Craig; Narayan, K, Water Resources Research 39 (SBH 10-1–SBH 10-11) 2003
Evidence for a Differential Cellular Distribution of Inward Rectifier K Channels in the Rat Isolated Mesenteric Artery
Crane, Glenis Jayne; Walker, S; Dora, K; Garland, C, Journal of Vascular Research 40 (159–168) 2003
Comparison of spinal myotatic reflexes in human adults investigated with cross-correlation and signal averaging methods
Miller, S; Clark, J; Eyre, J; Kelly, S; Lim, E; McClelland, V; McDonough, S; Metcalfe, Andrew, Brain Research 899 (47–65) 2001
On a generalized 2 + 1 dispersive water wave hierarchy
Gordoa, P; Joshi, Nalini; Pickering, A, Publications of the Research Institute for Mathematical Sciences 37 (327–347) 2001
Some new bounds for singular values and eigenvalues of matrix products
Lu, L-Z; Pearce, Charles, Annals of Operations Research 98 (141–148) 2001
The maximum sinkage of a ship
Gourlay, Timothy; Tuck, Ernest, Journal of Ship Research 45 (50–58) 2001
Three-dimensional inviscid waves in buoyant boundary layer flows
Denier, James; Stott, Jillian; Bassom, A, Fluid Dynamics Research 28 (89–109) 2001
Meta-analysis, overviews and publication bias
Solomon, Patricia; Hutton, Jonathon, Statistical Methods in Medical Research 10 (245–250) 2001
Disease surveillance and data collection issues in epidemic modelling
Solomon, Patricia; Isham, V, Statistical Methods in Medical Research 9 (259–277) 2000
Disease surveillance and intervention studies in developing countries
Solomon, Patricia, Statistical Methods in Medical Research 9 (183–184) 2000

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