The University of Adelaide
You are here
Text size: S | M | L
Printer Friendly Version
June 2018
MTWTFSS
    123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
252627282930 
       

Search the School of Mathematical Sciences

Find in People Courses Events News Publications

Events matching "The limits of proof"

Riemann's Hypothesis
15:10 Fri 31 Aug, 2007 :: G08 Mathematics building University of Adelaide :: Emeritus Prof. E. O. Tuck

Riemann's hypothesis (that all non-trivial zeros of the zeta function have real part one-half) is the most famous currently unproved conjecture in mathematics, and a \\$1M prize awaits its proof. The mathematical statement of this problem is only at about second-year undergraduate level; after all, the zeta function is much like the trigonometric sine function, and all (?) second-year students know that all zeros of the sine function are (real) integer multiples of $\\pi$. Many of the steps apparently needed to make progress on the proof are also not much more complicated than that level. Some of these elementary steps, together with numerical explorations, will be described here. Nevertheless the Riemann hypothesis has defied proof so far, and very complicated and advanced abstract mathematics (that will NOT be described here) is often brought to bear on it. Does it need abstract mathematics, or just a flash of elementary inspiration?
Values of transcendental entire functions at algebraic points.
15:10 Fri 28 Mar, 2008 :: LG29 Napier Building University of Adelaide :: Prof. Eugene Poletsky :: Syracuse University, USA

Algebraic numbers are roots of polynomials with integer coefficients, so their set is countable. All other numbers are called transcendental. Although most numbers are transcendental, it was only in 1873 that Hermite proved that the base $e$ of natural logarithms is not algebraic. The proof was based on the fact that $e$ is the value at 1 of the exponential function $e^z$ which is entire and does not change under differentiation.

This achievement raised two questions: What entire functions take only transcendental values at algebraic points? Also, given an entire transcendental function $f$, describe, or at least find properties of, the set of algebraic numbers where the values of $f$ are also algebraic. The first question, developed by Siegel, Shidlovsky, and others, led to the notion of $E$-functions, which have controlled derivatives. Answering the second question, Polya and Gelfond obtained restrictions for entire functions that have integer values at integer points (Polya) or Gaussian integer values at Gaussian integer points (Gelfond). For more general sets of points only counterexamples were known.

Recently D. Coman and the speaker developed new tools for the second question, which give an answer, at least partially, for general entire functions and their values at general sets of algebraic points.

In my talk we will discuss old and new results in this direction. All relevant definitions will be provided and the talk will be accessible to postgraduates and honours students.

The limits of proof
13:10 Wed 21 May, 2008 :: Napier 210 :: A/Prof Finnur Larusson

Media...
The job of the mathematician is to discover new truths about mathematical objects and their relationships. Such truths are established by proving them. This raises a fundamental question. Can every mathematical truth be proved (by a sufficiently clever being) or are there truths that will forever lie beyond the reach of proof? Mathematics can be turned on itself to investigate this question. In this talk, we will see that under certain assumptions about proofs, there are truths that cannot be proved. You must decide for yourself whether you think these assumptions are valid!
Another proof of Gaboriau-Popa
13:10 Fri 3 Jul, 2009 :: School Board Room :: Prof Greg Hjorth :: University of Melbourne

Gaboriau and Popa showed that a non-abelian free group on finitely many generators has continuum many measure preserving, free, ergodic, actions on standard Borel probability spaces. The original proof used the notion of property (T). I will sketch how this can be replaced by an elementary, and apparently new, dynamical property.
The proof of the Poincare conjecture
15:10 Fri 25 Sep, 2009 :: Napier 102 :: Prof Terrence Tao :: UCLA

In a series of three papers from 2002-2003, Grigori Perelman gave a spectacular proof of the Poincare Conjecture (every smooth compact simply connected three-dimensional manifold is topologically isomorphic to a sphere), one of the most famous open problems in mathematics (and one of the seven Clay Millennium Prize Problems worth a million dollars each), by developing several new groundbreaking advances in Hamilton's theory of Ricci flow on manifolds. In this talk I describe in broad detail how the proof proceeds, and briefly discuss some of the key turning points in the argument. About the speaker: Terence Tao was born in Adelaide, Australia, in 1975. He has been a professor of mathematics at UCLA since 1999, having completed his PhD under Elias Stein at Princeton in 1996. Tao's areas of research include harmonic analysis, PDE, combinatorics, and number theory. He has received a number of awards, including the Salem Prize in 2000, the Bochner Prize in 2002, the Fields Medal and SASTRA Ramanujan Prize in 2006, and the MacArthur Fellowship and Ostrowski Prize in 2007. Terence Tao also currently holds the James and Carol Collins chair in mathematics at UCLA, and is a Fellow of the Royal Society and the Australian Academy of Sciences (Corresponding Member).
Exploratory experimentation and computation
15:10 Fri 16 Apr, 2010 :: Napier LG29 :: Prof Jonathan Borwein :: University of Newcastle

Media...
The mathematical research community is facing a great challenge to re-evaluate the role of proof in light of the growing power of current computer systems, of modern mathematical computing packages, and of the growing capacity to data-mine on the Internet. Add to that the enormous complexity of many modern capstone results such as the Poincare conjecture, Fermat's last theorem, and the Classification of finite simple groups. As the need and prospects for inductive mathematics blossom, the requirement to ensure the role of proof is properly founded remains undiminished. I shall look at the philosophical context with examples and then offer some of five bench-marking examples of the opportunities and challenges we face.
A classical construction for simplicial sets revisited
13:10 Fri 27 Aug, 2010 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 (Suite 4) :: Dr Danny Stevenson :: University of Glasgow

Simplicial sets became popular in the 1950s as a combinatorial way to study the homotopy theory of topological spaces. They are more robust than the older notion of simplicial complexes, which were introduced for the same purpose. In this talk, which will be as introductory as possible, we will review some classical functors arising in the theory of simplicial sets, some well-known, some not-so-well-known. We will re-examine the proof of an old theorem of Kan in light of these functors. We will try to keep all jargon to a minimum.
Hugs not drugs
15:10 Mon 20 Sep, 2010 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Dr Scott McCue :: Queensland University of Technology

I will discuss a model for drug diffusion that involves a Stefan problem with a "kinetic undercooling". I like Stefan problems, so I like this model. I like drugs too, but only legal ones of course. Anyway, it turns out that in some parameter regimes, this sophisticated moving boundary problem hardly works better than a simple linear undergraduate model (there's a lesson here for mathematical modelling). On the other hand, for certain polymer capsules, the results are interesting and suggest new means for controlled drug delivery. If time permits, I may discuss certain asymptotic limits that are of interest from a Stefan problem perspective. Finally, I won't bring any drugs with me to the seminar, but I'm willing to provide hugs if necessary.
Centres of cyclotomic Hecke algebras
13:10 Fri 15 Apr, 2011 :: Mawson 208 :: A/Prof Andrew Francis :: University of Western Sydney

The cyclotomic Hecke algebras, or Ariki-Koike algebras $H(R,q)$, are deformations of the group algebras of certain complex reflection groups $G(r,1,n)$, and also are quotients of the ubiquitous affine Hecke algebra. The centre of the affine Hecke algebra has been understood since Bernstein in terms of the symmetric group action on the weight lattice. In this talk I will discuss the proof that over an arbitrary unital commutative ring $R$, the centre of the affine Hecke algebra maps \emph{onto} the centre of the cyclotomic Hecke algebra when $q-1$ is invertible in $R$. This is the analogue of the fact that the centre of the Hecke algebra of type $A$ is the set of symmetric polynomials in Jucys-Murphy elements (formerly known as he Dipper-James conjecture). Key components of the proof include the relationship between the trace functions on the affine Hecke algebra and on the cyclotomic Hecke algebra, and the link to the affine braid group. This is joint work with John Graham and Lenny Jones.
Natural operations on the Hochschild cochain complex
13:10 Fri 3 Jun, 2011 :: Mawson 208 :: Dr Michael Batanin :: Macquarie University

The Hochschild cochain complex of an associative algebra provides an important bridge between algebra and geometry. Algebraically, this is the derived center of the algebra. Geometrically, the Hochschild cohomology of the algebra of smooth functions on a manifold is isomorphic to the graduate space of polyvector fields on this manifold. There are many important operations acting on the Hochschild complex. It is, however, a tricky question to ask which operations are natural because the Hochschild complex is not a functor. In my talk I will explain how we can overcome this obstacle and compute all possible natural operations on the Hochschild complex. The result leads immediately to a proof of the Deligne conjecture on Hochschild cochains.
Embedding circle domains into the affine plane C^2
13:10 Fri 10 Feb, 2012 :: B.20 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Franc Forstneric :: University of Ljubljana

We prove that every circle domain in the Riemann sphere admits a proper holomorphic embedding into the affine plane C^2. By a circle domain we mean a domain obtained by removing from the Riemann sphere a finite or countable family of pairwise disjoint closed round discs. Our proof also applies to some circle domains with punctures. The uniformization theorem of He and Schramm (1996) says that every domain in the Riemann sphere with at most countably many boundary components is conformally equivalent to a circle domain, so our theorem embeds all such domains properly holomorphically in C^2. (Joint work with Erlend F. Wold.)
The Four Colour Theorem
11:10 Mon 23 Jul, 2012 :: B.17 Ingkarni Wardli :: Mr Vincent Schlegel :: University of Adelaide

Media...
Arguably the most famous problem in discrete mathematics, the Four Colour Theorem was first conjectured in 1852 by South African mathematician Francis Guthrie. For 124 years, it defied many attempts to prove and disprove it. I will talk briefly about some of the rich history of this result, including some of the graph-theoretic techniques used in the 1976 Appel-Haken proof.
The Banach-Tarski Paradox
11:10 Mon 30 Jul, 2012 :: G.07 Engineering Mathematics :: Mr William Crawford :: University of Adelaide

Media...
The Banach-Tarski Paradox is one of the most counter intuitive results in set theory. It states that a ball can be cut up into a finite number of pieces, which using just rotations and translations can be reassembled into two identical copies of the original ball. This contradicts our naive belief that cutting, rotating and translating objects in Euclidean space should preserve volume. However the construction of the "cutting" is heavily dependent on the axiom of choice, and the resultant pieces are non-measurable, i.e. no consistent notion of volume can be assigned to them. A stronger form of the theorem states that any two bounded subsets of R^3 with non-empty interior are equidecomposable, that is one can be disassembled and reassembled into the other. I'll be going through a brief proof of the theorem (and in doing so further alienate the pure mathematicians in the room from everybody else).
The fundamental theorems of invariant theory, classical and quantum
15:10 Fri 10 Aug, 2012 :: B.21 Ingkarni Wardli :: Prof Gus Lehrer :: The University of Sydney

Media...
Let V = C^n, and let (-,-) be a non-degenerate bilinear form on V , which is either symmetric or anti-symmetric. Write G for the isometry group of (V , (-,-)); thus G = O_n (C) or Sp_n (C). The first fundamental theorem (FFT) provides a set of generators for End_G(V^{\otimes r} ) (r = 1, 2, . . . ), while the second fundamental theorem (SFT) gives all relations among the generators. In 1937, Brauer formulated the FFT in terms of his celebrated 'Brauer algebra' B_r (\pm n), but there has hitherto been no similar version of the SFT. One problem has been the generic non-semisimplicity of B_r (\pm n), which caused H Weyl to call it, in his work on invariants 'that enigmatic algebra'. I shall present a solution to this problem, which shows that there is a single idempotent in B_r (\pm n), which describes all the relations. The proof is through a new 'Brauer category', in which the fundamental theorems are easily formulated, and where a calculus of tangles may be used to prove these results. There are quantum analogues of the fundamental theorems which I shall also discuss. There are numerous applications in representation theory, geometry and topology. This is joint work with Ruibin Zhang.
Noncommutative geometry and conformal geometry
13:10 Fri 24 Aug, 2012 :: Engineering North 218 :: Dr Hang Wang :: Tsinghua University

In this talk, we shall use noncommutative geometry to obtain an index theorem in conformal geometry. This index theorem follows from an explicit and geometric computation of the Connes-Chern character of the spectral triple in conformal geometry, which was introduced recently by Connes and Moscovici. This (twisted) spectral triple encodes the geometry of the group of conformal diffeomorphisms on a spin manifold. The crux of of this construction is the conformal invariance of the Dirac operator. As a result, the Connes-Chern character is intimately related to the CM cocycle of an equivariant Dirac spectral triple. We compute this equivariant CM cocycle by heat kernel techniques. On the way we obtain a new heat kernel proof of the equivariant index theorem for Dirac operators. (Joint work with Raphael Ponge.)
Twisted analytic torsion and adiabatic limits
13:10 Wed 5 Dec, 2012 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Mr Ryan Mickler :: University of Adelaide

We review Mathai-Wu's recent extension of Ray-Singer analytic torsion to supercomplexes. We explore some new results relating these two torsions, and how we can apply the adiabatic spectral sequence due to Forman and Farber's analytic deformation theory to compute some spectral invariants of the complexes involved, answering some questions that were posed in Mathai-Wu's paper.
Hyperplane arrangements and tropicalization of linear spaces
10:10 Mon 17 Dec, 2012 :: Ingkarni Wardli B17 :: Dr Graham Denham :: University of Western Ontario

I will give an introduction to a sequence of ideas in tropical geometry, the tropicalization of linear spaces. In the beginning, a construction due to De Concini and Procesi (wonderful models, 1995) gave a combinatorially explicit description of various iterated blowups of projective spaces along (proper transforms of) linear subspaces. A decade later, Tevelev's notion of tropical compactifications led to, in particular, a new view of the wonderful models and their intersection theory in terms of the theory of toric varieties (via work of Feichtner-Sturmfels, Feichtner-Yuzvinsky, Ardila-Klivans, and others). Recently, these ideas have played a role in Huh and Katz's proof of a long-standing conjecture in combinatorics.
On the chromatic number of a random hypergraph
13:10 Fri 22 Mar, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B21 :: Dr Catherine Greenhill :: University of New South Wales

A hypergraph is a set of vertices and a set of hyperedges, where each hyperedge is a subset of vertices. A hypergraph is r-uniform if every hyperedge contains r vertices. A colouring of a hypergraph is an assignment of colours to vertices such that no hyperedge is monochromatic. When the colours are drawn from the set {1,..,k}, this defines a k-colouring. We consider the problem of k-colouring a random r-uniform hypergraph with n vertices and cn edges, where k, r and c are constants and n tends to infinity. In this setting, Achlioptas and Naor showed that for the case of r = 2, the chromatic number of a random graph must have one of two easily computable values as n tends to infinity. I will describe some joint work with Martin Dyer (Leeds) and Alan Frieze (Carnegie Mellon), in which we generalised this result to random uniform hypergraphs. The argument uses the second moment method, and applies a general theorem for performing Laplace summation over a lattice. So the proof contains something for everyone, with elements from combinatorics, analysis and algebra.
Kronecker-Weber Theorem
12:10 Mon 8 Apr, 2013 :: B.19 Ingkarni Wardli :: Konrad Pilch :: University of Adelaide

Media...
The Kronecker-Weber Theorem has a rich and inspiring history. Much like Fermat's Last Theorem, it can be expressed in a very simple way. Its many proofs often utilise heavy machinery and those who claim it can be solved using elementary means, have quite frankly redefined the meaning of elementary. It has inspired David Hilbert and many other mathematicians leading to a great amount of fantastic work in the area. In this talk, I will discuss this theorem, a 'fairly' simple proof of it as well as discuss how it is relevant to my work and the works of others.
A glimpse at the Langlands program
15:10 Fri 12 Apr, 2013 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Masoud Kamgarpour :: University of Queensland

Media...
Abstract: In the late 1960s, Robert Langlands made a series of surprising conjectures relating fundamental concepts from number theory, representation theory, and algebraic geometry. Langlands' conjectures soon developed into a high-profile international research program known as the Langlands program. Many fundamental problems, including the Shimura-Taniyama-Weil conjecture (partially settled by Andrew Wiles in his proof of the Fermat's Last Theorem), are particular cases of the Langlands program. In this talk, I will discuss some of the motivation and results in this program.
A new approach to pointwise heat kernel upper bounds on doubling metric measure spaces
12:10 Fri 7 Jun, 2013 :: Ingkarni Wardli B19 :: Prof Thierry Coulhon :: Australian National University

On doubling metric measure spaces endowed with a Dirichlet form and satisfying the Davies-Gaffney estimate, we show some characterisations of pointwise upper bounds of the heat kernel in terms of one-parameter weighted inequalities which correspond respectively to the Nash inequality and to a Gagliardo-Nirenberg type inequality when the volume growth is polynomial. This yields a new and simpler proof of the well-known equivalence between classical heat kernel upper bounds and the relative Faber-Krahn inequalities. We are also able to treat more general pointwise estimates where the heat kernel rate of decay is not necessarily governed by the volume growth. This is a joint work with Salahaddine Boutayeb and Adam Sikora.
The density property for complex manifolds: a strong form of holomorphic flexibility
12:10 Fri 24 Jan, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: Prof Frank Kutzschebauch :: University of Bern

Compared with the real differentiable case, complex manifolds in general are more rigid, their groups of holomorphic diffeomorphisms are rather small (in general trivial). A long known exception to this behavior is affine n-space C^n for n at least 2. Its group of holomorphic diffeomorphisms is infinite dimensional. In the late 1980s Andersen and Lempert proved a remarkable theorem which stated in its generalized version due to Forstneric and Rosay that any local holomorphic phase flow given on a Runge subset of C^n can be locally uniformly approximated by a global holomorphic diffeomorphism. The main ingredient in the proof was formalized by Varolin and called the density property: The Lie algebra generated by complete holomorphic vector fields is dense in the Lie algebra of all holomorphic vector fields. In these manifolds a similar local to global approximation of Andersen-Lempert type holds. It is a precise way of saying that the group of holomorphic diffeomorphisms is large. In the talk we will explain how this notion is related to other more recent flexibility notions in complex geometry, in particular to the notion of a Oka-Forstneric manifold. We will give examples of manifolds with the density property and sketch applications of the density property. If time permits we will explain criteria for the density property developed by Kaliman and the speaker.
The limits of proof
14:10 Wed 2 Apr, 2014 :: Hughes Lecture Room 322 :: Assoc. Prof. Finnur Larusson :: School of Mathematical Sciences

Media...
The job of the mathematician is to discover new truths about mathematical objects and their relationships. Such truths are established by proving them. This raises a fundamental question. Can every mathematical truth be proved (by a sufficiently clever being) or are there truths that will forever lie beyond the reach of proof? Mathematics can be turned on itself to investigate this question. In this talk, we will see that under certain assumptions about proofs, there are truths that cannot be proved. You must decide for yourself whether you think these assumptions are valid!
CARRYING CAPACITY FOR FINFISH AQUACULTURE IN SPENCER GULF: RAPID ASSESSMENT USING HYDRODYNAMIC AND NEAR-FIELD, SEMI - ANALYTIC SOLUTIONS
15:10 Fri 11 Apr, 2014 :: 5.58 Ingkarni Wardli :: Associate Professor John Middleton :: SARDI Aquatic Sciences and University of Adelaide

Aquaculture farming involves daily feeding of finfish and a subsequent excretion of nutrients into Spencer Gulf. Typically, finfish farming is done in six or so 50m diameter cages and over 600m X 600m lease sites. To help regulate the industry, it is desired that the finfish feed rates and the associated nutrient flux into the ocean are determined such that the maximum nutrient concentration c does not exceed a prescribed value (say cP) for ecosystem health. The prescribed value cP is determined by guidelines from the E.P.A. The concept is known as carrying capacity since limiting the feed rates limits the biomass of the farmed finfish. Here, we model the concentrations that arise from a constant input flux (F) of nutrients in a source region (the cage or lease) using the (depth-averaged) two dimensional, advection diffusion equation for constant and sinusoidal (tides) currents. Application of the divergence theorem to this equation results in a new scale estimate of the maximum flux F (and thus feed rate) that is given by F= cP /T* (1) where cP is the maximum allowed concentration and T* is a new time scale of “flushing” that involves both advection and diffusion. The scale estimate (1) is then shown to compare favourably with mathematically exact solutions of the advection diffusion equation that are obtained using Green’s functions and Fourier transforms. The maximum nutrient flux and associated feed rates are then estimated everywhere in Spencer Gulf through the development and validation of a hydrodynamic model. The model provides seasonal averages of the mean currents U and horizontal diffusivities KS that are needed to estimate T*. The diffusivities are estimated from a shear dispersal model of the tides which are very large in the gulf. The estimates have been provided to PIRSA Fisheries and Aquaculture to assist in the sustainable expansion of finfish aquaculture.
Boundary-value problems for the Ricci flow
15:10 Fri 15 Aug, 2014 :: B.18 Ingkarni Wardli :: Dr Artem Pulemotov :: The University of Queensland

Media...
The Ricci flow is a differential equation describing the evolution of a Riemannian manifold (i.e., a "curved" geometric object) into an Einstein manifold (i.e., an object with a "constant" curvature). This equation is particularly famous for its key role in the proof of the Poincare Conjecture. Understanding the Ricci flow on manifolds with boundary is a difficult problem with applications to a variety of fields, such as topology and mathematical physics. The talk will survey the current progress towards the resolution of this problem. In particular, we will discuss new results concerning spaces with symmetries.
The Serre-Grothendieck theorem by geometric means
12:10 Fri 24 Oct, 2014 :: Ingkarni Wardli B20 :: David Roberts :: University of Adelaide

The Serre-Grothendieck theorem implies that every torsion integral 3rd cohomology class on a finite CW-complex is the invariant of some projective bundle. It was originally proved in a letter by Serre, used homotopical methods, most notably a Postnikov decomposition of a certain classifying space with divisible homotopy groups. In this talk I will outline, using work of the algebraic geometer Offer Gabber, a proof for compact smooth manifolds using geometric means and a little K-theory.
Monodromy of the Hitchin system and components of representation varieties
12:10 Fri 29 May, 2015 :: Napier 144 :: David Baraglia :: University of Adelaide

Representations of the fundamental group of a compact Riemann surface into a reductive Lie group form a moduli space, called a representation variety. An outstanding problem in topology is to determine the number of components of these varieties. Through a deep result known as non-abelian Hodge theory, representation varieties are homeomorphic to moduli spaces of certain holomorphic objects called Higgs bundles. In this talk I will describe recent joint work with L. Schaposnik computing the monodromy of the Hitchin fibration for Higgs bundle moduli spaces. Our results give a new unified proof of the number of components of several representation varieties.
What is the best way to count votes?
13:10 Mon 12 Sep, 2016 :: Hughes 322 :: Dr Stuart Johnson :: School of Mathematical Sciences

Media...
Around the world there are many different ways of counting votes in elections, and even within Australia there are different methods in use in various states. Which is the best method? Even for the simplest case of electing one person in a single electorate there is no easy answer to this, in fact there is a famous result - Arrow's Theorem - which tells us that there is no perfect way of counting votes. I will describe a number of different methods along with their problems before giving a more precise statement of the theorem and outlining a proof
Geometric limits of knot complements
12:10 Fri 28 Apr, 2017 :: Napier 209 :: Jessica Purcell :: Monash University

Media...
The complement of a knot often admits a hyperbolic metric: a metric with constant curvature -1. In this talk, we will investigate sequences of hyperbolic knots, and the possible spaces they converge to as a geometric limit. In particular, we show that there exist hyperbolic knots in the 3-sphere such that the set of points of large injectivity radius in the complement take up the bulk of the volume. This is joint work with Autumn Kent.
Weil's Riemann hypothesis (RH) and dynamical systems
12:10 Fri 11 Aug, 2017 :: Engineering Sth S111 :: Tuyen Truong :: University of Adelaide

Media...
Weil proposed an analogue of the RH in finite fields, aiming at counting asymptotically the number of solutions to a given system of polynomial equations (with coefficients in a finite field) in finite field extensions of the base field. This conjecture influenced the development of Algebraic Geometry since the 1950’s, most important achievements include: Grothendieck et al.’s etale cohomology, and Bombieri and Grothendieck’s standard conjectures on algebraic cycles (inspired by a Kahlerian analogue of a generalisation of Weil’s RH by Serre). Weil’s RH was solved by Deligne in the 70’s, but the finite field analogue of Serre’s result is still open (even in dimension 2). This talk presents my recent work proposing a generalisation of Weil’s RH by relating it to standard conjectures and a relatively new notion in complex dynamical systems called dynamical degrees. In the course of the talk, I will present the proof of a question proposed by Esnault and Srinivas (which is related to a result by Gromov and Yomdin on entropy of complex dynamical systems), which gives support to the finite field analogue of Serre’s result.
Calculating optimal limits for transacting credit card customers
15:10 Fri 2 Mar, 2018 :: Horace Lamb 1022 :: Prof Peter Taylor :: University of Melbourne

Credit card users can roughly be divided into `transactors', who pay off their balance each month, and `revolvers', who maintain an outstanding balance, on which they pay substantial interest. In this talk, we focus on modelling the behaviour of an individual transactor customer. Our motivation is to calculate an optimal credit limit from the bank's point of view. This requires an expression for the expected outstanding balance at the end of a payment period. We establish a connection with the classical newsvendor model. Furthermore, we derive the Laplace transform of the outstanding balance, assuming that purchases are made according to a marked point process and that there is a simplified balance control policy which prevents all purchases in the rest of the payment period when the credit limit is exceeded. We then use the newsvendor model and our modified model to calculate bounds on the optimal credit limit for the more realistic balance control policy that accepts all purchases that do not exceed the limit. We illustrate our analysis using a compound Poisson process example and show that the optimal limit scales with the distribution of the purchasing process, while the probability of exceeding the optimal limit remains constant. Finally, we apply our model to some real credit card purchase data.
Chaos in higher-dimensional complex dynamics
13:10 Fri 20 Apr, 2018 :: Barr Smith South Polygon Lecture theatre :: Finnur Larusson :: University of Adelaide

Media...
I will report on new joint work with Leandro Arosio (University of Rome, Tor Vergata). Complex manifolds can be thought of as laid out across a spectrum characterised by rigidity at one end and flexibility at the other. On the rigid side, Kobayashi-hyperbolic manifolds have at most a finite-dimensional group of symmetries. On the flexible side, there are manifolds with an extremely large group of holomorphic automorphisms, the prototypes being the affine spaces $\mathbb C^n$ for $n \geq 2$. From a dynamical point of view, hyperbolicity does not permit chaos. An endomorphism of a Kobayashi-hyperbolic manifold is non-expansive with respect to the Kobayashi distance, so every family of endomorphisms is equicontinuous. We show that not only does flexibility allow chaos: under a strong anti-hyperbolicity assumption, chaotic automorphisms are generic. A special case of our main result is that if $G$ is a connected complex linear algebraic group of dimension at least 2, not semisimple, then chaotic automorphisms are generic among all holomorphic automorphisms of $G$ that preserve a left- or right-invariant Haar form. For $G=\mathbb C^n$, this result was proved (although not explicitly stated) some 20 years ago by Fornaess and Sibony. Our generalisation follows their approach. I will give plenty of context and background, as well as some details of the proof of the main result.

Publications matching "The limits of proof"

Publications
A proof of Atiyah's conjecture on configurations of four points in Euclidean three-space
Eastwood, Michael; Norbury, Paul, Geometry & Topology 5 (885–893) 2001

Advanced search options

You may be able to improve your search results by using the following syntax:

QueryMatches the following
Asymptotic EquationAnything with "Asymptotic" or "Equation".
+Asymptotic +EquationAnything with "Asymptotic" and "Equation".
+Stokes -"Navier-Stokes"Anything containing "Stokes" but not "Navier-Stokes".
Dynam*Anything containing "Dynamic", "Dynamical", "Dynamicist" etc.